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  • Dwelling in the Archive: Women Writing House, Home, and History in Late Colonial India

    Dwelling in the Archives uses the writing of three 20th century Indian women to interrogate the status of the traditional archive, reading their memoirs, fictions, and histories as counter-narratives of colonial modernity. Janaki Majumdar was the daughter of the first president of the Indian National Congress. Her unpublished "Family History" (1935) stages the story of her parents' transnational marriage as a series of homes the family inhabited in Britain and India -- thereby providing a heretofore unavailable narrative of the domestic face of 19th century Indian nationalism. Cornelia Sorabji was one of the first Indian women to qualify for the bar. Her memoirs (1934 and 1936) demonstrate her determination to rescue the zenana (women's quarters) and purdahashin (secluded women) from the recesses of the orthodox home in order to counter the emancipationist claims of Gandhian nationalism. Last but not least, Attia Hosain's 1961 novel, "Sunlight on Broken Column" represents the violence and trauma of partition through the biography of a young heroine called Laila and her family home. Taken together, their writings raise questions about what counts as an archive, offering us new insights into the relationship of women to memory and history, gender to fact and fiction, and feminism to nationalism and postcolonialism.

  • Copyright's Paradox

    The United States Supreme Court famously labeled copyright "the engine of free expression" because it provides a vital economic incentive for much of the literature, commentary, music, art, and film that makes up our public discourse. Yet today's greatly expanded copyright law often does the opposite--it can be used to quash news reporting, political commentary, church dissent, historical scholarship, cultural critique, and artistic expression. In Copyright's Paradox, Neil Weinstock Netanel explores the tensions between copyright law and free speech concerns, revealing how copyright law can impose unacceptable burdens on speech. Netanel provides concrete illustrations of how copyright often prevents speakers from effectively conveying their message, tracing this conflict across both traditional and digital media and considering current controversies such as the YouTube and MySpace copyright infringements, Hip-hop music and digital sampling, and the Google Book Search litigation. The author juxtaposes the dramatic expansion of copyright holders' proprietary control against the individual's newly found ability to digitally cut, paste, edit, remix, and distribute sound recordings, movies, TV programs, graphics, and texts the world over. He tests whether, in light of these developments and others, copyright still serves as a vital engine of free expression and he assesses how copyright does--and does not--burden speech. Taking First Amendment values as his lodestar, Netanel argues that copyright should be limited to how it can best promote robust debate and expressive diversity, and he presents a blueprint for how that can be accomplished. Copyright and free speech will always stand in some tension. But there are ways in which copyright can continue to serve as an engine of free expression while leaving ample room for speakers to build on copyrighted works to convey their message, express their personal commitments, and fashion new art. This book shows us how.

  • Black Reconstruction in America: The Oxford W. E. B. Du Bois, Volume 6

    W. E. B. Du Bois was a public intellectual, sociologist, and activist on behalf of the African American community. He profoundly shaped black political culture in the United States through his founding role in the NAACP, as well as internationally through the Pan-African movement. Du Bois's sociological and historical research on African-American communities and culture broke ground in many areas, including the history of the post-Civil War Reconstruction period. Du Bois was also a prolific author of novels, autobiographical accounts, innumerable editorials and journalistic pieces, and several works of history. Black Reconstruction in America tells and interprets the story of the twenty years of Reconstruction from the point of view of newly liberated African Americans. Though lambasted by critics at the time of its publication in 1935, Black Reconstruction has only grown in historical and literary importance. In the 1960s it joined the canon of the most influential revisionist historical works. Its greatest achievement is weaving a credible, lyrical historical narrative of the hostile and politically fraught years of 1860-1880 with a powerful critical analysis of the harmful effects of democracy, including Jim Crow laws and other injustices. With a series introduction by editor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and an introduction by David Levering Lewis, this edition is essential for anyone interested in African American history.

  • Slaves and Masters in the Roman Empire: A Study in Social Control

    This is a reprint in paper covers of a work originally published by Collection Latomus. The study offers a broad explanation of how the Roman system of slavery was maintained in the imperial age and describes the adverse conditions under which the majority of slaves in the Roman world spent their lives.

  • The Nature Handbook: A Guide to Observing the Great Outdoors

    This guidebook takes the concept and format of a standard field guide in a new direction. It is designed for anyone interested in nature, explores the natural world through a series of observations based on general themes including-- relationship of size and shape, adaptations, distribution patterns, behavior, and diversity of life forms. Readers will learn about plants, animals, and habitats, as they discover the pleasure of understanding organisms and patterns in the environment.

  • The American Presidency: A Very Short Introduction

    The expansion of executive powers amid the war on terrorism has brought the presidency to the center of heated public debate. Now, in The American Presidency, presidential authority Charles O. Jones provides invaluable background to the current controversy, in a compact, reliable guide to the office of the chief executive. This marvelously concise survey is packed with information about the presidency, some of it quite surprising. We learn, for example, that the Founders adopted the word "president" over "governor" and other alternatives because it suggested a light hand, as in one who presides, rather than rules. Indeed, the Constitutional Convention first agreed to a weak chief executive elected by congress for one seven-year term, later calling for independent election and separation of powers. Jones sheds much light on how assertive leaders, such as Andrew Jackson, Theodore Roosevelt, and FDR enhanced the power of the presidency, and illuminating how such factors as philosophy (Reagan's anti-Communist conservatism), the legacy of previous presidencies (Jimmy Carter following Watergate), relations with Congress, and the impact of outside events have all influenced presidential authority. He also explores the rise of federal power and the dramatic expansion of federal agencies, showing how the president takes a direct hand in this vast bureaucracy, and he examines the political process of selecting presidents, from the days of deadlocked conventions to the rise of the primary after World War II. "In 200 years," he writes, "the presidency had changed from that of a person--Washington followed by Adams, then Jefferson--to a presidential enterprise with a cast of thousands." Jones explains how this remarkable expansion has occurred and where it may lead in the future. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

  • Alger Hiss's Looking-Glass Wars: The Covert Life of a Soviet Spy

    For decades, a great number of Americans saw Alger Hiss as an innocent victim of McCarthyism--a distinguished diplomat railroaded by an ambitious Richard Nixon. And even as the case against Hiss grew over time, his dignified demeanor helped create an aura of innocence that outshone the facts in many minds. Now G. Edward White deftly draws together the countless details of Hiss's life--from his upper middle-class childhood in Baltimore and his brilliant success at Harvard to his later career as a self-made martyr to McCarthyism--to paint a fascinating portrait of a man whose life was devoted to perpetuating a lie. White catalogs the evidence that proved Hiss's guilt, from Whittaker Chambers's famous testimony, to copies of State Department documents typed on Hiss's typewriter, to Allen Weinstein's groundbreaking investigation in the 1970s. The author then explores the central conundrums of Hiss's life: Why did this talented lawyer become a Communist and a Soviet spy? Why did he devote so much of his life to an extensive public campaign to deny his espionage? And how, without producing any new evidence, did he convince many people that he was innocent? White offers a compelling analysis of Hiss's behavior in the face of growing evidence of his guilt, revealing how this behavior fit into an ongoing pattern of denial and duplicity in his life. The story of Alger Hiss is in part a reflection of Cold War America--a time of ideological passions, partisan battles, and secret lives. It is also a story that transcends a particular historical era--a story about individuals who choose to engage in espionage for foreign powers and the secret worlds they choose to conceal. In White's skilled hands, the life of Alger Hiss comes to illuminate both of those themes.

  • The Global Information Technology Report 2002-2003: Readiness for the Networked World

    That "The Global Information Technology Report 2001-2002" received such a notable positive response from a broad range of stakeholders underscores the growing relevance of information technology (IT) in national economies and the continuing need for an assessment of the readiness of countries to participate in the Networked World. Recognizing the relevance of an the rapid changes in information technology, this report is an update to the 2001-2002 Report, which is the first and most comprehensive international assessment of the readiness of countries to capture the benefits of participating in the Networked World. With regional analyses and specific country case studies, essays on a variety of IT-related subjects, detailed country profiles, and country rankings comparing the global IT experience of different nations, this report remains the most authoritative documentation to date of how ITs are being used around the world.

  • Nanoscale Energy Transport and Conversion: A Parallel Treatment of Electrons, Molecules, Phonons, and Photons

    This is a graduate level textbook in nanoscale heat transfer and energy conversion that can also be used as a reference for researchers in the developing field of nanoengineering. It provides a comprehensive overview of microscale heat transfer, focusing on thermal energy storage and transport. Chen broadens the readership by incorporating results from related disciplines, from the point of view of thermal energy storage and transport, and presents related topics on the transport of electrons, phonons, photons, and molecules. This book is part of the MIT-Pappalardo Series in Mechanical Engineering.

  • The 1928 Book of Common Prayer

    The 1928 Book of Common Prayer is a treasured resource for traditional Anglicans and others who appreciate the majesty of King James-style language. This classic edition features a Presentation section containing certificates for the rites of Baptism, Confirmation, and Marriage. The elegant burgundy hardcover binding is embossed with a simple gold cross, making it an ideal choice for both personal study and gift-giving.

    The 1928 Book of Common Prayer combines Oxford's reputation for quality construction and scholarship with a modest price - a beautiful prayer book and an excellent value.

  • Western Muslims and the Future of Islam

    In a Western world suddenly acutely interested in Islam, one question has been repeatedly heard above the din: where are the Muslim reformers? With this ambitious volume, Tariq Ramadan firmly establishes himself as one of Europe's leading thinkers and one of Islam's most innovative and important voices. As the number of Muslims living in the West grows, the question of what it means to be a Western Muslim becomes increasingly important to the futures of both Islam and the West. While the media are focused on radical Islam, Ramadan claims, a silent revolution is sweeping Islamic communities in the West, as Muslims actively seek ways to live in harmony with their faith within a Western context. French, English, German, and American Muslims--women as well as men--are reshaping their religion into one that is faithful to the principles of Islam, dressed in European and American cultures, and definitively rooted in Western societies. Ramadan's goal is to create an independent Western Islam, anchored not in the traditions of Islamic countries but in the cultural reality of the West. He begins by offering a fresh reading of Islamic sources, interpreting them for a Western context and demonstrating how a new understanding of universal Islamic principles can open the door to integration into Western societies. He then shows how these principles can be put to practical use. Ramadan contends that Muslims can-indeed must-be faithful to their principles while participating fully in the civic life of Western secular societies. Grounded in scholarship and bold in its aims, Western Muslims and the Future of Islam offers a striking vision of a new Muslim Identity, one which rejects once and for all the idea that Islam must be defined in opposition to the West.

  • Siva: The Erotic Ascetic

    Originally published under the title Asceticism and Eroticism in the Mythology of Siva, this book traces the development of an Indian approach to an enduring human dilemma: the conflict between spiritual aspirations and human desires. The work examines hundreds of related myths and a wide range of Indian texts--Vedic, Puranic, classical, modern, and tribal--centering on the stories of the great ascetic, Siva, and his erotic alter ego, Kama.

  • Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice

    They were black and white, young and old, men and women. In the spring and summer of 1961, they put their lives on the line, riding buses through the American South to challenge segregation in interstate transport. Their story is one of the most celebrated episodes of the civil rights movement, yet a full-length history has never been written until now. In these pages, acclaimed historian Raymond Arsenault provides a gripping account of six pivotal months that jolted the consciousness of America. The Freedom Riders were greeted with hostility, fear, and violence. They were jailed and beaten, their buses stoned and firebombed. In Alabama, police stood idly by as racist thugs battered them. When Martin Luther King met the Riders in Montgomery, a raging mob besieged them in a church. Arsenault recreates these moments with heart-stopping immediacy. His tightly braided narrative reaches from the White House--where the Kennedys were just awakening to the moral power of the civil rights struggle--to the cells of Mississippi's infamous Parchman Prison, where Riders tormented their jailers with rousing freedom anthems. Along the way, he offers vivid portraits of dynamic figures such as James Farmer, Diane Nash, John Lewis, and Fred Shuttlesworth, recapturing the drama of an improbable, almost unbelievable saga of heroic sacrifice and unexpected triumph. The Riders were widely criticized as reckless provocateurs, or "outside agitators." But indelible images of their courage, broadcast to the world by a newly awakened press, galvanized the movement for racial justice across the nation. Freedom Riders is a stunning achievement, a masterpiece of storytelling that will stand alongside the finest works on the history of civil rights.

  • Engaging Music: Essays in Music Analysis

    This collection of 21 model essays written by some of the most highly regarded contemporary North American scholars in music theory is designed to provide advanced undergraduates and graduates majoring in music with exemplary models of music analysis. The book would be a useful supplement to the scores that are studies in upper level Form and Analysis courses. The topics range from Purcell and Bach to the classical (Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven), 19th-century masters (Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Chopin, and Wagner) and 20th-century (Bartok, Schoenberg, Webern). Also included are analyses of popular music (jazz, rock, the Beatles) and a recent work by Barbara Kolb.

  • Basic and Clinical Neurocardiology

    The progression of heart disease is associated with changes in the neurohumoral mechanisms that control cardiac function. The degree to which this neurohumoral remodelling occurs, even before overt signs of cardiac disease become manifest, is important for prognosis. To determine why some patients experience sudden death while others sustain life in the presence of severely compromised cardiac function, the neuronal control of cardiac electrical and mechanical events must be considered. Starting at the level of individual neurons and building upwards, this book describes the synergistic interactions that occur among intrathoracic and CNS feedback loops to permit precise control of regional cardiac behaviour. On this basic science foundation, subsequent clinical chapters explore the remodelling that occurs in this system with ageing, with the evolution of specific cardiac pathologies, and with the psychological concomitants of heart disease. Most importantly, these chapters provide unique insights into how specific therapies like beta-andrenergic receptor blockade not only affect cardiomyocytes directly but also mitigate the adverse neurohumoral changes that accompany disease processes, such as heart failure and essential hypertension. The paradigm advanced in this volume is that heart disease is a multifaceted phenomenon involving the interplay of neurohumoral, cardiomyocyte and structural elements, each of which depends on the other. With our cumulative understanding of these interdependent processes, new avenues for time-appropriate, targeted methods of treating heart diseases can be developed.

  • The Great Depression and New Deal: A Very Short Introduction

    The New Deal shaped our nation's politics for decades, and was seen by many as tantamount to the "American Way" itself. Now, in this superb compact history, Eric Rauchway offers an informed account of the New Deal and the Great Depression, illuminating its successes and failures. Rauchway first describes how the roots of the Great Depression lay in America's post-war economic policies--described as "laissez-faire with a vengeance"--which in effect isolated our nation from the world economy just when the world needed the United States most. He shows how the magnitude of the resulting economic upheaval, and the ineffectiveness of the old ways of dealing with financial hardships, set the stage for Roosevelt's vigorous (and sometimes unconstitutional) Depression-fighting policies. Indeed, Rauchway stresses that the New Deal only makes sense as a response to this global economic disaster. The book examines a key sampling of New Deal programs, ranging from the National Recovery Agency and the Securities and Exchange Commission, to the Public Works Administration and Social Security, revealing why some worked and others did not. In the end, Rauchway concludes, it was the coming of World War II that finally generated the political will to spend the massive amounts of public money needed to put Americans back to work. And only the Cold War saw the full implementation of New Deal policies abroad--including the United Nations, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund. Today we can look back at the New Deal and, for the first time, see its full complexity. Rauchway captures this whole in a remarkably short space, making this book an ideal introduction to one of the great policy revolutions in history. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

  • Seize the Dance! BaAka Musical Life and the Ethnography of Performance

    "Pygmy music" has captivated students and scholars of anthropology and music for decades if not centuries, but until now this aspect of their culture has never been described in a work that is at once vividly engaging, intellectually rigorous, and self-consciously aware of the ironies of representation. Seize the Dance! is an ethnomusical study focused on the music and dance of BaAka forest people, who live in the Lobaye region of the Central African Republic. Based on ethnographic research that Michelle Kisliuk conducted from 1986 through 1995, this book describes BaAka songs, drum rhythms, and dance movements--along with their contexts of social interaction--in an elegant narrative that is enhanced by many photographs, musical illustrations, and field recordings on a companion website.

  • Richard Wright's Black Boy (American Hunger): A Casebook

    This casebook gathers together the most important critical responses to Richard Wright's autobiography. It includes a 1945 interview with Richard Wright, contemporary reviews of Black Boy written by W.E.B. Du Bois, Lionel Trilling, Mary McCarthy, and Ralph Ellison, and eight critical essays. These essays address a range of topics including the circumstances of the book's original publication in 1945; the relationship between the novel and Wright's actual biography; the African-American autobiographical tradition; the influences of various writers and literary movements on Black Boy; and the impact of African-American vernacular and oral performance on Wright's autobiography.

  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders: A Complete Guide to Getting Well and Staying Well

    Morbid obsessions with sex or germs or with one's appearance, and uncontrollable compulsions to hoard objects, to check and recheck locks, or to pull one's hair are just a few of the symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders. Problems such as these afflict over ten million Americans. Many suffer in isolation, not knowing that their disorder has a name, how to seek help, or how to help themselves. Now Dr. Fred Penzel, a psychologist with over eighteen years experience in treating Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders, has written a book to help this group of sufferers, their families, and those who would help them. In Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders, Dr. Penzel discusses the entire spectrum of these disorders, from the classic form characterized by intrusive, repetitive, and often unpleasant thoughts, to body dysmorphic disorder ("imagined ugliness"), trichotillomania (compulsive hair-pulling), compulsive skin picking, and nail biting. Dr. Penzel takes the reader through each step of the most effective behavioral therapies, detailing how progress is made and how to avoid relapse. He also offers a completely up-to-date discussion of medication--how medication is used as part of the overall treatment, its effect on pregnancy, how to choose the best medicine, and how to know if it is working. In addition, Dr. Penzel discusses the treatment of children with these disorders, offers helpful advice for the families of sufferers, and lists sources of help and information (including the latest sites on the Internet). The book also includes a useful appendix that features symptom checklists for each of the OC spectrum disorders, the DSM-IV diagnostic descriptions, a reading list, and a glossary. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders is the most complete guide ever written about this family of perplexing problems. Its practical, accurate, and up-to-the-minute information gives those with OC Disorders all they need to know to get well and stay well.

  • Tornado Alley: Monster Storms of the Great Plains

    Tornadoes are the most violent, magnificent, and utterly unpredictable storms on earth, reaching estimated wind speeds of 300 mph and leaving swathes of destruction in their wake. In Tornado Alley, Howard Bluestein draws on two decades of experience chasing and photographing tornadoes across the American Plains to present a historical account of the study of tornadoes and the great thunderstorms that spawn them. A century ago, tornado warnings were so unreliable that they usually went unreported. Today, despite cutting-edge Doppler radar technology and computer simulation, these storms remain remarkably difficult to study. Leading scientists still conduct much of their research from the inside of a speeding truck, and often contend with jammed cameras, flash floods, and windshields smashed by hailstones and flying debris. Using over a hundred diagrams, models, and his own spectacular color photographs, Bluestein documents the exhilaration of hair-raising encounters with as many as nine tornadoes in one day, as well as the crushing disappointment of failed expeditions and ruined equipment. Most of all, he recreates the sense of beauty, mystery, and power felt by the scientists who risk their lives to study violent storms. For scientists, amateur weather enthusiasts, or anyone who's ever been intrigued or terrified by a darkening sky, Tornado Alley provides not only a history of tornado research but a vivid look into the origin and effects of nature's most dramatic phenomena.

  • Cause Lawyering and the State in a Global Era

    Sarat and Scheingold's book, Cause Lawyering, the first volume of its kind, coined the term for law as practiced by the politically motivated and those devoted to moral activism. The new collection examines cause lawyering in the global context, exploring the ways in which it is influencing and being influenced by the disaggregation of state power associated with democratization, and how democratization empowers lawyers who want to effect change. New configurations of state power create opportunities for altering the political and social status quo. Cause lawyers are developing transnational networks to exploit these global opportunities, and to help strengthen international norms on issues such as human rights. The fifteen essays will focus on different national settings including South Africa, Israel, the U.K. and Latin America.

  • The Economy As an Evolving Complex System III: Current Perspectives and Future Directions

    Derived from the 2001 Santa Fe Institute Conference, "The Economy as an Evolving Complex System III," represents scholarship from the leading figures in th area of economics and complexity. The subject, a perennial centerpiece of the SFI program of studies has gained a wide range of followers for its methods of employing empirical evidence in the development of analytical economic theories. Accordingly, the chapters in this volume addresses a wide variety of issues in the fields of economics and complexity, accessing eclectic techniques from many disciplines, provided that they shed light on the economic problem. Dedicated to Kenneth Arrow on his 80th birthday, this volume honors his many contributions to the Institute. SFI-style economics is regarded as having had an important impact in introducing a new approach to economic analysis.

  • Understanding Child Maltreatment: An Ecological and Developmental Perspective

    Child maltreatment professionals from all disciplines struggle to find better ways of understanding and treating the families and children affected by child maltreatment. Since the mid-1960's, the "battered child syndrome," and recent high-profile abuse cases, a plethora or research and literature on child maltreatment has emerged, yet thesis the first volume to offer a comprehensive integrated analysis for understanding, assessing, and treating child maltreatment within the ecological framework in a developmental context. This framework systematically organizes and integrates the complex empirical literature in child maltreatment and development, including the often over-looked period of adolescence. Viewing child maltreatment from an ecological perspective, this volume identifies the risk and protective factors correlated with abuse and neglect. The authors present a comprehensive assessment framework, addressing the multiple developmental and environmental factors unique to each case. This framework fully considers risk and protective factors and their relationship to individuals, families, and environmental elements, presenting a much-needed perspective for today's child protective services workers. Understanding Child Maltreatment is the first book of its kind; while most books broadly address the developmental consequences of maltreatment, this book goes further by proposing assessment and intervention strategies based on a deep understanding of each stage of a child's development. Interventions center on the caregiver and the family, with particular attention to parenting skills and the challenges the child may experience within his or her developmental stage. Each chapter emphasizes empirically based interventions and includes a case illustration that guides perspective on maltreatment, this book will be invaluable to students, researchers, and professionals.

  • Himalayan Hermitess: The Life of a Tibetan Buddhist Nun

    Orgyan Chokyi (1675-1729) spent her life in Dolpo, the highest inhabited region of the Nepal Himalayas. Illiterate and expressly forbidden by her master to write her own life story, Orgyan Chokyi received divine inspiration to compose one of the most forthright and engaging spiritual autobiographies of the Tibetan literary tradition. Her life story is the oldest of only four Tibetan autobiographies authored by women. It is also a rare example of writing by a pre-modern Buddhist woman, and thus holds a unique place in Buddhist literature as a whole. Translator Kurtis Schaeffer prefaces the text with an illuminating study of the life and times of Orgyan Chokyi and an extended analysis of the hermitess's view of the relation between gender, suffering, and liberation. Based almost entirely on primary Tibetan documents never before translated, this fascinating book will be of interest to those studying Buddhism, gender and religion, and the culture of the Tibetan world.

  • Against the Modern World: Traditionalism and the Secret Intellectual History of the Twentieth Century

    Against the Modern World is the first history of Traditionalism, an influential yet surprisingly little-known twentieth century anti-modernist movement. Involving a number of important, yet often secret, religious groups in the West and Islamic world, it affected mainstream and radical politics in Europe and religious studies in the United States. Emerging from the 'discovery' in the West of non-Western religious writings, at a time in the nineteeth century when progressive intellectuals had lost faith in the ability of Christianity to deliver religious and spiritual truth, it was fuelled by the widespread religious scepticism that followed World War I. It found its voice in Rene Guenon, a French writer who rejected modernity as a dark age, and sought to reconstruct the Perennial Philosophy - the fundamental truth uniting all the world's religions. Mark Sedgwick reveals how this pervasive intellectual movement helped shape major events in twentieth century religious life, politics and scholarship - all the while remaining invisible to outsiders.

  • Inventing God's Law: How the Covenant Code of the Bible Used and Revised the Laws of Hammurabi

    In this book David Wright draws on three of his influential published essays to create a boldly revisionist account of the origin of the so-called Covenant Collection of the Torah (Exodus 20:23-23:19). He argues that this body of law depends mainly on the Laws of Hammurabi and to some extent on other cuneiform law collections, that it is chiefly the work of a single author, that it is to a significant degree the result of intellectual interaction with the author's sources rather than a collection of Israelite/Judean legal traditions, and that it may have had a politically ideological purpose, somewhat similar to that of the Laws of Hammurabi. Wright presents his argument in three parts. Part One lays out the evidence for the Covenant Collection's dependence of the Laws of Hammurabi and other Akkadian law collections, and argues that the time frame for this dependence was in the Neo-Assyrian period (8th century BCE). Part Two explores the techniques and logic used by the author who composed the Covenant Collection. Part Three discusses the larger issues arising from these conclusions, including the degree to which the work reflects Israelite/Judean legal customs, the purpose and ideological nature of the work, other redactional models of the work, the Collection's connection to the larger Sinai narrative, and other biblical literature that appears to have been influenced by Mesopotamian ideas, perhaps in the Neo-Assyrian period. In addition to advancing our understanding of the Covenant Collection itself, Wright's groundbreaking work offers a new basis for the study of the history of biblical law.

  • Perl for Exploring DNA

    This book provides a friendly introduction to Perl that emphasizes good programming practices with repeated exposure to pattern matching as applied to biological sequence analysis (DNA analysis, Protein analysis). The book is appropriate for postgraduates in computer science or biology and in particular to new interdisciplinary courses.

  • The Lees of Virginia: Seven Generations of an American Family

    Nagel chronicles seven generations of the Lee family, from founder Richard Lee to General Robert E. Lee.

  • The Pursuit of Justice: Supreme Court Decisions that Shaped America

    With a survey of the thirty Supreme Court cases that, in the opinion of U.S. Supreme Court justices and leading civics educators and legal historians, are the most important for American citizens to understand, The Pursuit of Justice is the perfect companion for those wishing to learn more about American civics and government. The cases range across three centuries of American history, including such landmarks as Marbury v. Madison (1803), which established the principle of judicial review; Scott v. Sandford (1857), which inflamed the slavery argument in the United States and led to the Civil War; Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), which memorialized the concept of separate but equal; and Brown v. Board of Education (1954), which overturned Plessy. Dealing with issues of particular concern to students, such as voting, school prayer, search and seizure, and affirmative action, and broad democratic concepts such as separation of powers, federalism, and separation of church and state, the book covers all the major cases specified in the national and state civics and American history standards. For each case, there is an introductory essay providing historical background and legal commentary as well as excerpts from the decision(s); related documents such as briefs or evidence, with headnotes and/or marginal commentary, some possibly in facsimile; and features or sidebars on principal players in the decisions, whether attorneys, plaintiffs, defendants, or justices. An introductory essay defines the criteria for selecting the cases and setting them in the context of American history and government, and a concluding essay suggests the role that the Court will play in the future.

  • Securities Valuation: Applications of Financial Modeling

    Securities Valuation: Applications of Financial Modeling is a clear, concise guide to securities valuation and the principles of financial theory. It describes state-of-the-art methods for valuing a broad range of securities: equity, equity and interest rate options, swaps and swaptions, treasuries, corporate bonds with and without credit risks, mortgage-backed securities, collateralized mortgage obligations, credit derivative swaps, and more. Thomas Ho and Sang Bin Lee use their combined fifty years of experience in academia, financial business, and public services to present students and general readers with twenty-six challenging cases. These cases describe the contexts in which financial models are used, the practical complications of these models, and ways to deal with their limitations. Each chapter begins with a problem in valuation, formulates models for it, and then provides the solutions. The assumptions, input data, and output solutions for each model are clearly stated. The model is illustrated by a numerical example rendered in Excel. A Online Resource Centre-www.thomasho.com-contains more than 130 Excel files of all the financial models from this book and its three companion volumes. Users can download the models, analyze them on their spreadsheets, and use them to do practice exercises Securities Valuation: Applications of Financial Modeling is ideal for undergraduate and graduate courses in finance and mathematical finance as well as for professional training programs. It is part of a series on financial modeling by the authors that also includes The Oxford Guide to Financial Modeling. Future titles in the series will focus on financial modeling for options, futures, and derivatives and financial modeling for financial institutions.

  • School Crime and Juvenile Justice

    School Crime and Juvenile Justice, Second Edition, examines the nature, extent, and causes of school crime and disruptive behavior, offering a comprehensive overview of this significant and growing problem. Drawing on numerous sources and on studies conducted over the past ten years, the second edition reviews the most up-to-date theories on the relationship between school crime and crime in the community, the role of parents and peers, and schools' organization and policies. Lawrence discusses current research findings, laws and school policies, prevention strategies, and alternative schools and special education programs for at-risk and delinquent students. Extensively revised and updated, this edition includes two new chapters: Chapter 6 examines the school environment and how school size, structure, and related factors affect school crime and safety, while Chapter 7 discusses recent research on identifying which students may be at risk of committing school violence. Chapters on the causes of juvenile delinquency and the role of police, courts, and corrections in the administration of juvenile justice have been expanded and updated to reflect the latest available research and resources. Ideal for criminal justice courses and an indispensable resource for scholars and school administrators, School Crime and Juvenile Justice, Second Edition, takes a closer look at the problem of crime and violence in and around schools. It offers a clear understanding of how people can work together to create safer schools and how educators and juvenile justice officials can develop cooperative delinquency prevention programs.

  • Conversations on Consciousness: What the Best Minds Think About the Brain, Free Will, And What It Means to Be Human

    In Conversations on Consciousness, Susan Blackmore interviews some of the great minds of our time, a who's who of eminent thinkers, all of whom have devoted much of their lives to understanding the concept of consciousness. The interviewees, ranging from major philosophers to renowned scientists, talk candidly with Blackmore about some of the key philosophical issues confronting us in a series of conversations that are revealing, insightful, and stimulating. They ruminate on the nature of consciousness (is it something apart from the brain?) and discuss if it is even possible to understand the human mind. Some of these thinkers say no, but most believe that we will pierce the mystery surrounding consciousness, and that neuroscience will provide the key. Blackmore goes beyond the issue of consciousness to ask other intriguing questions: Is there free will? (A question which yields many conflicted replies, with most saying yes and no.) If not, how does this effect the way you live your life; and more broadly, how has your work changed the way you live?
    Paired with an introduction and extensive glossary that provide helpful background information, these provocative conversations illuminate how some of the greatest minds tackle some of the most difficult questions about human nature.

  • The Birth of Bioethics

    This book is the first broad history of the growing field of bioethics. Covering the period 1947-1987, it examines the origin and evolution of the debates over human experimentation, genetic engineering, organ transplantation, termination of life-sustaining treatment, and new reproductive technologies. It assesses the contributions of philosophy, theology, law and the social sciences to the expanding discourse of bioethics. Written by one of the field's founders, it is based on extensive archival research into resources that are difficult to obtain and on interviews with many leading figures. A very readable account of the development of bioethics, the book stresses the history of ideas but does not neglect the social and cultural context and the people involved.

  • Slayer Slang: A Buffy the Vampire Slayer Lexicon

    Michael Adams begins his book with a synopsis of the programme's history and a defence of ephemeral language. He then moves to the main body of the work: a detailed glossary of slayer slang, annotated with actual dialogue and recorded in the style accepted by the American Dialect Society. The book concludes with a bibliography and a lengthy index, a guide to sources (novels based on the show, magazine articles about the show, and language culled from the official posting board) and an appendix of slang-making suffixes. Introduced by Jane Espenson, one of the show's most inventive writers (and herself a linguist), Slayer Slang offers a quintessential example of contemporary youth culture serving as a vehicle for slang. bitca n [AHD4 bitch n in sense 2.a + a] Bitch 1997 Sep 15 Whedon When She Was Bad "[Willow:] 'I mean, why else would she be acting like such a b-i-t-c-h?' [Giles:] 'Willow, I think we're all a little old to be spelling things out.' [Xander:] 'A bitca?'" break and enterish adj [AHD4 sv breaking and entering n + -ish suff in sense 2.a] Suitable for crime 1999 Mar 16 Petrie Enemies "I'll go home and stock up on weapons, slip into something a little more break and enterish." [B] carbon-dated adj [fr. AHD4 carbondating + -ed] Very out of date 1997 Mar 10 Whedon Welcome to the Hellmouth "[Buffy:] 'Deal with that outfit for a moment.' [Giles:] 'It's dated?' [Buffy:] 'It's carbon-dated.'" cuddle-monkey n [AHD4 cuddle v + monkey n in sense 2, by analogy fr. RHHDAS (also DAS3 and NTC) sv cuddle bunny 'an affectionate, passionate, or sexually attractive young woman'] Male lover 1998 Feb 10 Noxon Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered "Every woman in Sunnydale wants to make me her cuddle-monkey." [X]

  • The Emergence of Everything: How the World Became Complex

    When the whole is greater than the sum of the parts--indeed, so great that the sum far transcends the parts and represents something utterly new and different--we call that phenomenon emergence. When the chemicals diffusing in the primordial waters came together to form the first living cell, that was emergence. When the activities of the neurons in the brain result in mind, that too is emergence. In The Emergence of Everything, one of the leading scientists involved in the study of complexity, Harold J. Morowitz, takes us on a sweeping tour of the universe, a tour with 28 stops, each one highlighting a particularly important moment of emergence. For instance, Morowitz illuminates the emergence of the stars, the birth of the elements and of the periodic table, and the appearance of solar systems and planets. We look at the emergence of living cells, animals, vertebrates, reptiles, and mammals, leading to the great apes and the appearance of humanity. He also examines tool making, the evolution of language, the invention of agriculture and technology, and the birth of cities. And as he offers these insights into the evolutionary unfolding of our universe, our solar system, and life itself, Morowitz also seeks out the nature of God in the emergent universe, the God posited by Spinoza, Bruno, and Einstein, a God Morowitz argues we can know through a study of the laws of nature. Written by one of our wisest scientists, The Emergence of Everything offers a fascinating new way to look at the universe and the natural world, and it makes an important contribution to the dialogue between science and religion.

  • David Hackett Souter: Traditional Republican on the Rehnquist Court

    When the first President Bush chose David Hackett Souter for the Supreme Court in 1990, the slender New Englander with the shy demeanor and ambiguous past was quickly dubbed a "stealth candidate". Determined to avoid a repeat of the firestorm surrounding President Reagan's nomination of the controversial Robert Bork, Bush opted for Souter, who had, remarkably, produced only one law review article in his legal career. Souter, an obscure but well-respected New Hampshire conservative, seemed unlikely to arouse the kind of passionate opposition that defined the Bork confirmation process. And, indeed, Souter was accepted onto the Court with little fuss. Today, fifteen years into his tenure, Souter remains as enigmatic and unpredictable as ever, a mystery even to avid Court watchers. Who is David Hackett Souter and what will be his legacy on the Supreme Court? Sifting through Souter's opinions, papers of the Justice's contemporaries and other relevant records and interviews, esteemed Supreme Court biographer Tinsley Yarbrough here gives us the real David Souter, crafting a fascinating account of one of the heretofore most elusive Justices in the history of the Court. Though Souter's record on legal issues was generally conservative before his arrival on the Court, his mixed views caused some concern among both the left and the right during the appointment process. His reclusive lifestyle and frugality added to his mystique, making him even more difficult to peg. His penchant for solitude and his seemingly narrow circle of close friends convinced some that the middle-aged bachelor was out of touch with the sort of "real world" problems the nation's highest court regularly confronts. Court watchers soon realized--to their delight or dismay--that President Bush's "stealth" justice was a traditional New England Republican deeply tied to the party's historic roots in the union and civil rights--in stark contrast to most Reagan-Bush I appointees. On the bench, Souter has embraced a flexible, evolving, and highly pragmatic judicial style that embraces a high regard for precedent--even liberal decisions of the Warren and Burger Courts with which he may have personally disagreed. Even more significantly, Souter has become a regular and very effective critic of the set of rulings via which his ostensible political brethren--Chief Justice William Rehnquist, Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas--have abandoned precedent to assert their conservative vision. Ultimately, Yarbrough contends, Souter has become the principal Rehnquist Court opponent of the originalist, text-bound jurisprudence that many of the more conservative Justices profess to champion.

  • Reporting Technical Information

    BETTER WRITING AND SUCCESS AT WORK BEGIN IN YOUR CLASSROOM WITH REPORTING TECHNICAL INFORMATION, ELEVENTH EDITION, A CLASSIC TEXT WITH THOROUGHLY CONTEMPORARY CONTENT.

    One of the leading texts in technical writing, Reporting Technical Information introduces students to all aspects of effective professional communication, including letters, proposals, progress reports, recommendation reports, research reports, instructions, and oral reports.

    FEATURES OF THE ELEVENTH EDITION:

    * A fully integrated companion website--www.oup.com/us/houp--that offers:
    Additional practical resources for students: chapter overviews, sample writings, self-tests, "current topic" annotated links and additional resources, interactive tutorials, key terms and concepts, downloadable versions of important question checklists from the book, and a collaborative network
    Resources for instructors: an Instructor's Manual and downloadable PowerPoint files for use as lecture aids (also available on CD), links to online resources, and writing assignments instructors have shared for "Better Writing--Success at Work"
    Three different types of icons throughout the book that direct students to the website for additional resources: sample documents, exercises, and further reading
    * New, broader approach that prepares students in a variety of science, health, business, engineering, and technical majors to develop the types of documents they will need to write in their prospective work environments
    * Strong focus on the rhetorical nature of writing, helping writers to understand their readers and the contexts in which their documents will be read and used, define their purpose in writing, and design documents using these issues as critical guidelines
    * Updated and additional coverage of current technology, including thoroughly revised chapters on document design and usability that take into account web-based documents and platforms
    * New opening scenarios for each chapter that demonstrate the impact of technical communication in the real world
    * New chapters on content management, versatility and creativity for reports, and using design and format to achieve clarity in documents
    * Increased coverage of ethics and international and global workplace issues
    * Many new example documents--more than half of the sample documents in the text are new--and more illustrative figures
    * More end-of-chapter exercises, including projects that encourage student interaction and collaboration, several of which are linked to an online component on the companion website

  • Ecological Orbits: How Planets Move and Populations Grow

    A famous ecologist and a philosopher of science team up to offer a fresh new approach to population biology and ecology. Challenging the traditionally accepted Lotka-Volterra model, which is based on predator-prey interactions, this new model emphasizes maternal effects, specifically the significance of a mother's interest in the success of her female offspring.

  • Into the Silent Land: A Guide to the Christian Practice of Contemplation

    Sitting in stillness, the practice of meditation, and the cultivation of awareness are commonly thought to be the preserves of Hindus and Buddhists. Martin Laird shows that the Christian tradition of contemplation has its own refined teachings on using a prayer word to focus the mind, working with the breath to cultivate stillness, and the practice of inner vigilance or awareness. But this book is not a mere historical survey of these teachings. In Into the Silent Land, we see the ancient wisdom of both the Christian East and West brought sharply to bear on the modern-day longing for radical openness to God in the depths of the heart.

    Laird's book is not like the many presentations for beginners. While useful for those just starting out, this book serves especially as a guide for those who desire to journey yet deeper into the silence of God. The heart of the book focuses on negotiating key moments of struggle on the contemplative path, when the whirlwind of distractions or the brick wall of boredom makes it difficult to continue. Laird shows that these inner struggles, even wounds, that any person of prayer must face, are like riddles, trying to draw out of us our own inner silence. Ultimately Laird shows how the wounds we loathe become vehicles of the healing silence we seek, beyond technique and achievement.
    Throughout the language is fresh, direct, and focused on real-life examples of people whose lives are incomparably enriched by the practice of contemplation.

  • An Introduction to Quality Assurance in Health Care

    Avedis Donabedian's name is synonymous with quality of medical care. He unravelled the mystery behind the concept by defining it in clear operational terms and provided detailed blueprints for both its measurement (known as quality assessment) and its improvement (known as quality assurance). Many before him claimed that quality couldn't be defined in concrete objective terms. He demonstrated that quality is an attribute of a system which he called structure, a set of organized activities which he called process, and an outcome which results from both. In this book Donabedian tells the full story of quality assessment and assurance in simple, clear terms. He defines the meaning of quality, explicates its components, and provides clear and systematic guides to its assessment and enhancement. His style is lucid, succinct, systematic and yet personal, almost conversational.

  • History of US Age of Extremes Book 8 Student Guide

    Developed to complement the Middle/High School teaching guides, these student study guides were created as reproducible support for extension and self-directed study of the books. Every chapter is covered by a lesson, which includes activities to reinforce the following areas: access, vocabulary, map skills, comprehension, critical thinking, working with primary sources and further writing. Each study guide contains reproducible maps and explanations of graphic organizers, as well as suggestions on how to do research and special projects.

  • Insanity: Murder, Madness, and the Law

    The insanity defense is one of the oldest fixtures of the Anglo-American legal tradition. Though it is available to people charged with virtually any crime, and is often employed without controversy, homicide defendants who raise the insanity defense are often viewed by the public and even the legal system as trying to get away with murder. Often it seems that legal result of an insanity defense is unpredictable, and is determined not by the defendants mental state, but by their lawyers and psychologists influence. From the thousands of murder cases in which defendants have claimed insanity, Doctor Ewing has chosen ten of the most influential and widely varied. Some were successful in their insanity plea, while others were rejected. Some of the defendants remain household names years after the fact, like Jack Ruby, while others were never nationally publicized. Regardless of the circumstances, each case considered here was extremely controversial, hotly contested, and relied heavily on lengthy testimony by expert psychologists and psychiatrists. Several of them played a major role in shaping the criminal justice system as we know it today. In this book, Ewing skillfully conveys the psychological and legal drama of each case, while providing important and fresh professional insights. For the legal or psychological professional, as well as the interested reader, Insanity will take you into the minds of some of the most incomprehensible murderers of our age.

  • Budapest: A Cultural History

    The views of Budapest by the River Danube are unparalleled in Europe. On one side the Buda Hills reach almost to the riverside, with Castle Hill and Gell�rt Hill offering outstanding panoramas. Pest, linked to Buda by a series of imposing bridges, with its mixture of late nineteenth-century Historicist and early twentieth-century Art Nouveau architecture, is still very much a "turn-of-the-century" city.

    For more than fifty years prior to the Second World War, Budapest was one of the outstanding cultural capitals of Central Europe, on a par with, and in some ways ahead of, Vienna and Prague. Now no longer "hidden" behind the Iron Curtain, much of that old atmosphere has returned. With its rich and often turbulent history, its unique thermal baths, its excellent public transport system, its street caf�s and broad-ranging cultural scene, Budapest is a captivating metropolis, currently being rediscovered as one of the liveliest cities in the region.

    * City on the Danube: Straddling the majestic river, Budapest's setting is unique; bridges and baths, cafes and squares; an architecture than recalls the pre-1914 era.

    * City of fusions: Bart�k and Kod�ly fused folk and classical; the tradition continues with Budapest's vibrant mixture of live folk, gypsy, klezmer and jazz.

    * City of the unknown: Breaking through the barrier of the Hungarian language, often described as impenetrable, presented here are writers and poets deserving international recognition.

  • The Solace of Fierce Landscapes: Exploring Desert and Mountain Spirituality

    In the tradition of Kathleen Norris, Terry Tempest Williams, and Thomas Merton, The Solace of Fierce Landscapes explores the impulse that has drawn seekers into the wilderness for centuries and offers eloquent testimony to the healing power of mountain silence and desert indifference. Interweaving a memoir of his mother's long struggle with Alzheimer's and cancer, meditations on his own wilderness experience, and illuminating commentary on the Christian via negativa--a mystical tradition that seeks God in the silence beyond language--Lane rejects the easy affirmations of pop spirituality for the harsher but more profound truths that wilderness can teach us. "There is an unaccountable solace that fierce landscapes offer to the soul. They heal, as well as mirror, the brokeness we find within." It is this apparent paradox that lies at the heart of this remarkable book: that inhuman landscapes should be the source of spiritual comfort. Lane shows that the very indifference of the wilderness can release us from the demands of the endlessly anxious ego, teach us to ignore the inessential in our own lives, and enable us to transcend the "false self" that is ever-obsessed with managing impressions. Drawing upon the wisdom of St. John of the Cross, Meister Eckhardt, Simone Weil, Edward Abbey, and many other Christian and non-Christian writers, Lane also demonstrates how those of us cut off from the wilderness might "make some desert" in our lives. Written with vivid intelligence, narrative ease, and a gracefulness that is itself a comfort, The Solace of Fierce Landscapes gives us not only a description but a "performance" of an ancient and increasingly relevant spiritual tradition.

  • Principles of Nutritional Assessment

    This is a comprehensive text on the methods - dietary, anthropometric, laboratory and clinical - of assessing the nutritional status of populations and of individuals in the hospital or the community. The second edition incorporates recent data from national nutritional surveys in the US and Europe; the flood of new information about iron, vitamin A and iodine; the role of folate in preventing neural tube defects; the use of HPLC techniques and enzyme assays; improvements in data handling; and many other developments since 1990.

  • Silent Scourge: Children, Pollution, and Why Scientists Disagree

    How does pollution impact our daily quality of life? What are the effects of pollution on children's development? Why do industry and environmental experts disagree about what levels of pollutants are safe? This clearly written book, traces the debates over five key pollutants - lead, mercury, noise, pesticides, and dioxins and PCBs - and provides an overview of the history of each pollutant, basic research findings, and the scientific and regulatory controversies surrounding it. It focuses, in particular, on the impact of these pollutants on children's psychological development, their intellectual functioning, behaviour, and emotional states. Only by understanding the impact of pollution can we prevent future negative effects on quality of life and even pollution disasters from occurring. This volume will be of great interest to parents, child health care experts, public health officials, regulators, and health and environmental lawyers.

  • Unfinished Business: Racial Equality in American History

    Michael J. Klarman, author of From Jim Crow to Civil Rights, which won the prestigious Bancroft Prize in American History, is one of the leading authorities on the history of civil rights law in the United States. In Unfinished Business, he illuminates the course of racial equality in America, revealing that we have made less progress than we like to think. Indeed, African Americans have had to fight for everything they have achieved.

    Klarman highlights a variety of social and political factors that have influenced the path of racial progress--wars, migrations, urbanization, shifting political coalitions--and he looks in particular at the contributions of law and of court decisions to American equality. The author argues that court decisions tend to reflect the racial mores of the times, which is why the Supreme Court has not been a heroic defender of the rights of racial minorities. And even when the Court has promoted progressive racial change, its decisions have often been unenforced, in part because severely oppressed groups rarely have the resources necessary to force the issue. Klarman also sheds light on the North/South dynamic and how it has influenced racial progress, arguing that as southerners have become more anxious about outside challenges to their system of white supremacy, they have acted in ways that eventually undermined that system. For example, as southern slave owners demanded greater guarantees for slavery from the federal government, they alienated northerners, who came to fear a slave power conspiracy that would interfere with their liberties.

    Unfinished Business offers an invaluable, succinct account of racial equality and civil rights throughout American history.

  • Nicolaus Copernicus: Making the Earth a Planet

    Born in Poland in 1473, Nicolaus Copernicus launched a quiet revolution. No scientist so radically transformed our understanding of our place in the universe as this curious bishop's doctor and church official. In his quest to discover a beautiful and coherent system to describe the motions of the planets, Copernicus placed the sun in the center of the system and made the earth a planet traveling around the sun. Today it is hard to imagine our solar system any other way, but for his time Copernicus's idea was earthshaking. In 1616 the church banned his book Revolutions because it contradicted the accepted notion that God placed Earth in the center of the universe. Even though those who knew of his work considered his idea dangerous, Revolutions remained of interest only to other scientists for many years. It took almost two hundred years for his concept of a sun-centered system to reach the general public. None the less, what Copernicus set out in his remarkable text truly revolutionized science. For this, Copernicus, a quiet doctor who made a tremendous leap of imagination, is considered the father of the Scientific Revolution.

  • Creating Black Americans: African-American History and Its Meanings, 1619 to the Present

    Here is a magnificent account of a past rich in beauty and creativity, but also in tragedy and trauma. Eminent historian Nell Irvin Painter blends a vivid narrative based on the latest research with a wonderful array of artwork by African American artists, works which add a new depth to our understanding of black history. Painter offers a history written for a new generation of African Americans, stretching from life in Africa before slavery to today's hip-hop culture. The book describes the staggering number of Africans--over ten million--forcibly transported to the New World, most doomed to brutal servitude in Brazil and the Caribbean. Painter looks at the free black population, numbering close to half a million by 1860 (compared to almost four million slaves), and provides a gripping account of the horrible conditions of slavery itself. The book examines the Civil War, revealing that it only slowly became a war to end slavery, and shows how Reconstruction, after a promising start, was shut down by terrorism by white supremacists. Painter traces how through the long Jim Crow decades, blacks succeeded against enormous odds, creating schools and businesses and laying the foundations of our popular culture. We read about the glorious outburst of artistic creativity of the Harlem Renaissance, the courageous struggles for Civil Rights in the 1960s, the rise and fall of Black Power, the modern hip-hop movement, and two black Secretaries of State. Painter concludes that African Americans today are wealthier and better educated, but the disadvantaged are as vulnerable as ever. Painter deeply enriches her narrative with a series of striking works of art--more than 150 in total, most in full color--works that profoundly engage with black history and that add a vital dimension to the story, a new form of witness that testifies to the passion and creativity of the African-American experience. * Among the dozens of artists featured are Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett, Beauford Delaney, Jacob Lawrence, and Kara Walker * Filled with sharp portraits of important African Americans, from Olaudah Equiano (one of the first African slaves to leave a record of his captivity) and Toussaint L'Ouverture (who led the Haitian revolution), to Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth, to Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X

  • Trumpet Technique

    Like a peak performance book for athletes, Trumpet Technique will be a resource for performers, teachers, and students seeking to develop the highest level of skill. Frank Gabriel Campos, a trumpet professor and performer, applies the latest developments in physiology, psychology, learning theory and psychomotor research to brass technique and performance.

  • Allan's Circuits Problems

    One of the enduring trademarks of engineering students is their desire to learn through solving problems. Allan's Circuits Problems by Allan D. Kraus provides over 400 linear circuit analysis problems solved and tested by the author. These problems offer varying degrees of difficulty to encourage and challenge the student. This manual is ideal for self-study or as a supplement to any introductory electrical engineering text, such as Oxford University Press's popular Linear Circuit Analysis, Second Edition (ISBN 0-19-513666-7) by Raymond A. DeCarlo and Pen-Min Lin or Introduction to Electrical Engineering (ISBN 0-19-513604-7) by Mulukutla S. Sarma This manual can also be used to prepare for the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE)/ Engineer-in-Training (EIT) exam and the Professional Engineer (PE) exam. For a complete and detailed list of engineering exam review books available from Oxford University Press, visit our website at http://www.oup-usa.org/engineeringpress. Also available from Oxford University Press DeCarlo and Lin's Linear Circuit Analysis, Second Edition (ISBN 0-19-513666-7): Ray's Linear Circuits Lectures to Accompany Linear Circuit Analysis, Second Edition by Raymond A. DeCarlo and Pen-Min Lin (ISBN 0-19-514751-0) Solutions Manual to Accompany Linear Circuit Analysis, Second Edition by Raymond A. DeCarlo and Pen-Min Lin (ISBN 0-19-514218-7) Microsoft PowerPoint(R) Overheads to Accompany Linear Circuit Analysis, Second Edition (ISBN 0-19-514724-3) Sarma's Introduction to Electrical Engineering (ISBN 0-19-513604-7): Solutions Manual to Accompany Introduction to Electrical Engineering by Mulukutla S. Sarma (ISBN 0-19-514260-8) Microsoft PowerPoint(R) Overheads to Accompany Introduction to Electrical Engineering (ISBN 0-19-514472-4) KC's Problems and Solutions to Accompany Microelectronic Circuits, Fourth Edition, by K. C. Smith (ISBN 0-19-511771-9) Spice, Second Edition, by Gordon Roberts and Adel Sedra (ISBN 0-19-510842-6) Getting Started with MATLAB(R) by Rudra Pratap (ISBN 0-19-515014-7)

  • Deflating Existential Consequence: A Case for Nominalism

    If we must take mathematical statements to be true, must we also believe in the existence of abstract eternal invisible mathematical objects accessible only by the power of pure thought? Jody Azzouni says no, and he claims that the way to escape such commitments is to accept (as an essential part of scientific doctrine) true statements which are about objects that don't exist in any sense at all. Azzouni illustrates what the metaphysical landscape looks like once we avoid a militant Realism which forces our commitment to anything that our theories quantify. Escaping metaphysical straitjackets (such as the correspondence theory of truth), while retaining the insight that some truths are about objects that do exist, Azzouni says that we can sort scientifically-given objects into two categories: ones which exist, and to which we forge instrumental access in order to learn their properties, and ones which do not, that is, which are made up in exactly the same sense that fictional objects are. He offers as a case study a small portion of Newtonian physics, and one result of his classification of its ontological commitments, is that it does not commit us to absolute space and time.

  • The Oxford Companion to American Theatre

    First published in 1984, Gerald Bordman's Oxford Companion to American Theatre is the standard one-volume source on our national theatre. Critics have hailed its "wealth of authoritative information" (Back Stage), its "fascinating picture of the volatile American stage" (The Guardian), and its "well-chosen, illuminating facts" (Newsday). Now thoroughly revised, this distinguished volume once again provides an up-to-date guide to the American stage from its beginnings to the present. Completely updated by theater professor Thomas Hischak, the volume includes playwrights, plays, actors, directors, producers, songwriters, famous playhouses, dramatic movements, and much more. The book covers not only classic works (such as Death of a Salesman) but also many commercially successful plays (such as Getting Gertie's Garter), plus entries on foreign figures that have influenced our dramatic development (from Shakespeare to Beckett and Pinter). New entries include recent plays such as Angels in America and Six Degrees of Separation, performers such as Eric Bogosian and Bill Irwin, playwrights like David Henry Hwang and Wendy Wasserstein, and relevant developments and issues including AIDS in American theatre, theatrical producing by Disney, and the rise in solo performance. Accessible and authoritative, this valuable A-Z reference is ideal not only for students and scholars of theater, but everyone with a passion for the stage.

  • The Wealth of Wives: Women, Law, and Economy in Late Medieval London

    London became an international center for import and export trade in the late Middle Ages. The export of wool, the development of luxury crafts and the redistribution of goods from the continent made London one of the leading commercial cities of Europe. While capital for these ventures came from a variety of sources, the recirculation of wealth through London women was important in providing both material and social capital for the growth of London's economy. A shrewd Venetian visiting England around 1500 commented about the concentration of wealth and property in women's hands. He reported that London law divided a testator's property three ways allowing a third to the wife for her life use, a third for immediate inheritance of the heirs, and a third for burial and the benefit of the testator's soul. Women inherited equally with men and widows had custody of the wealth of minor children. In a society in which marriage was assumed to be a natural state for women, London women married and remarried. Their wealth followed them in their marriages and was it was administered by subsequent husbands. This study, based on extensive use of primary source materials, shows that London's economic growth was in part due to the substantial wealth that women transmitted through marriage. The Italian visitor observed that London men, unlike Venetians, did not seek to establish long patrilineages discouraging women to remarry, but instead preferred to recirculate wealth through women. London's social structure, therefore, was horizontal, spreading wealth among guilds rather than lineages. The liquidity of wealth was important to a growing commercial society and women brought not only wealth but social prestige and trade skills as well into their marriages. But marriage was not the only economic activity of women. London law permitted women to trade in their own right as femmes soles and a number of women, many of them immigrants from the countryside, served as wage laborers. But London's archives confirm women's chief economic impact was felt in the capital and skill they brought with them to marriages, rather than their profits as independent traders or wage labourers.

  • Encyclopedia of African American History (3 volumes)

    It is impossible to understand America without understanding the history of African Americans. The Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619-1895 documents the full range of the African American experience during that period and shows how all aspects of American culture, history, and national identity have been profoundly influenced by the experiences of African Americans. The Encyclopedia covers an extraordinary range of subjects, such as: abolitionism, black nationalism, black seafarers, Buffalo Soldiers, The Civil War, oratory and verbal arts, Reconstruction, religion and slavery, Underground Railroad, and voting rights.

  • The Biology of Human Survival: Life and Death in Extreme Environments

    The range of environments in which people can survive is extensive, yet most of the natural world cannot support human life. The Biology of Human Survival identifies the key determinants of life or death in extreme environments from a physiologist's perspective, integrating modern concepts of stress, tolerance, and adaptation into explanations of life under Nature's most austere conditions. The book examines how individuals survive when faced with extremes of immersion, heat, cold or altitude, emphasising the body's recognition of stress and the brain's role in optimising physiological function in order to provide time to escape or to adapt. In illustrating how human biology adapts to extremes, the book also explains how we learn to cope by blending behaviour and biology, first by trial and error, then by rigorous scientific observation, and finally by technological innovation. The book describes life-support technology and how it enables humans to enter once unendurable realms from the depths of the ocean to the upper reaches of the atmosphere and beyond. Finally, it explores the role that advanced technology might play in special environments of the future, such as long journeys into space.

  • The United States Constitution: What It Says, What It Means: A Hip Pocket Guide

    Affordable, readable, and indispensable,The United States Constitution: What it Says, What it Means allows you to put the most important document in American history in your back pocket. In conjunction with Justice Learning and The Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands and with an introduction written by Caroline Kennedy and an afterword written by David Eisenhower, this pocket guide appeals to the broadest possible audience. Each Article and each Amendment is followed by a clear and concise explanation, in plain English, that is suitable for both middle and high school students. On December 8, 2004 President Bush officially signed Constitution Day into law. The law mandates that each year, on September 17th, schools and colleges that receive federal money are required to teach the Constitution. The new law was championed in Congress by Sen. Robert Byrd who famously carries around a copy of the document in his pocket. Sen. Byrd became increasingly alarmed at the lack of civics education-specifically relating to the Constitution-in our public schools and he wanted to take action. Lightweight, easy to use and easy for everyone to understand The United States Constitution: What it Says, What it Means is an excellent way for students and citizens of all ages to read and completely comprehend the building block of American democracy. Justice Learning (www.justicelearning.org), is a comprehensive on-line resource that offers wide-ranging non-partisan materials relating to civics education.

  • Oh Joy! Oh Rapture!: The Enduring Phenomenon of Gilbert and Sullivan

    In Oh Joy! Oh Rapture! expert and enthusiast Ian Bradley explores the world of Gilbert and Sullivan over the last four and a half decades, looking at the way this "phenomenon" is passed from generation to generation. Taking as his starting point the expiry of copyright on the opera libretti at the end of 1961 and using fascinating hitherto unpublished archive material, Bradley reveals the extraordinary story of the last years of the old D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, the guardian of Savoy tradition for over a hundred years, and the troubled history of its successor. He explores the rich vein of parodies, spoofs, and spin-offs of the songs, as well as their influence on twentieth century lyricists and composers. He analyzes professional productions across the world, looks at the unique place of G&S in schools, colleges, and universities, and lovingly explores the culture of amateur performance. He also uncovers the largely male world of the obsessive fans, those collecting memorabilia, the myriad magazines, journals, websites, and festivals devoted to G&S, and the arcane interests of some of the faithful "inner brotherhood."

  • International Trademark Classification: A Guide to the Nice Agreement

    This book explains the forty-five Classes of goods and services that were adopted under the Nice Agreement, a worldwide classification system for trademark registration that is adhered to by more than seventy countries. It sets forth the Official Text of Class Headings and the Explanatory Notes of which goods and services are included or excluded from each Class. This is followed by the Authors examination of each item within the Class, including those items for which there are no official explanations. The Third Edition incorporates the changes brought about by the 9th Edition of the Nice Agreement Classification, which is effective as of 1 January 2007. The specific changes from the 8th edition are separately explained, so that the reader can quickly grasp what those changes are.

  • A Field Guide for Science Writers: The Official Guide of the National Association of Science Writers

    This is the official text for the National Association of Science Writers. In the eight years since the publication of the first edition of A Field Guide for Science Writing, much about the world has changed. Some of the leading issues in today's political marketplace - embryonic stem cell research, global warming, health care reform, space exploration, genetic privacy, germ warfare - are informed by scientific ideas. Never has it been more crucial for the lay public to be scientifically literate. That's where science writers come in. And that's why it's time for an update to the Field Guide, already a staple of science writing graduate programs across the country. The academic community has recently recognized how important it is for writers to become more sophisticated, knowledgeable, and skeptical about what they write. More than 50 institutions now offer training in science writing. In addition mid-career fellowships for science writers are growing, giving journalists the chance to return to major universities for specialized training. We applaud these developments, and hope to be part of them with this new edition of the Field Guide. In A Field Guide for Science Writers, 2nd Edition, the editors have assembled contributions from a collections of experienced journalists who are every bit as stellar as the group that contributed to the first edition. In the end, what we have are essays written by the very best in the science writing profession. These wonderful writers have written not only about style, but about content, too. These leaders in the profession describe how they work their way through the information glut to find the gems worth writing about. We also have chapters that provide the tools every good science writer needs: how to use statistics, how to weigh the merits of conflicting studies in scientific literature, how to report about risk. And, ultimately, how to write.

  • Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture

    Visual culture is central to how we communicate. Our lives are dominated by images and by visual technologies that allow for the local and global circulation of ideas, information, and politics. In this increasingly visual world, how can we best decipher and understand the many ways that our everyday lives are organized around looking practices and the many images we encounter each day? Now in a new edition, Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture provides a comprehensive and engaging overview of how we understand a wide array of visual media and how we use images to express ourselves, to communicate, to play, and to learn. Marita Sturken and Lisa Cartwright--two leading scholars in the emergent and dynamic field of visual culture and communication--examine the diverse range of approaches to visual analysis and lead students through key theories and concepts. Using clear, accessible language, vivid examples, and more than 250 full-color illustrations, the authors both explain and apply theory as they discuss how we see paintings, prints, photographs, film, television, video, advertisements, the news, the Internet, digital media, and visualization techniques in medicine and science. This truly interdisciplinary text bridges art history, film, media, and cultural studies to investigate how images carry meaning within and between different cultural arenas in everyday life, from art and commerce to science and the law. Sturken and Cartwright analyze images in relation to a wide spectrum of cultural and representational issues (desire, power, the gaze, bodies, sexuality, and ethnicity) and methodologies (semiotics, Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminism, and postcolonial theory). Thoroughly updated to incorporate cutting-edge theoretical research, the second edition examines the following new topics: the surge of new media technologies; the impact of globalization on the flow of information and media form and content; and how nationalism and security concerns have changed our looking practices in the aftermath of 9/11. Challenging yet accessible, Practices of Looking is ideal for courses across a range of disciplines, including media and film studies, communications, art history, and photography. Beautifully designed and now in a larger format and in full color throughout, Practices of Looking is an invaluable guide to understanding the complexities, contradictions, and pleasures of the visual world. Instructor's manual availalbe online.

  • The Art of the Infinite: The Pleasures of Mathematics

    Robert Kaplan's The Nothing That Is: A Natural History of Zero was an international best-seller, translated into eight languages. The Times called it "elegant, discursive, and littered with quotes and allusions from Aquinas via Gershwin to Woolf" and The Philadelphia Inquirer praised it as "absolutely scintillating."
    In this delightful new book, Robert Kaplan, writing together with his wife Ellen Kaplan, once again takes us on a witty, literate, and accessible tour of the world of mathematics. Where The Nothing That Is looked at math through the lens of zero, The Art of the Infinite takes infinity, in its countless guises, as a touchstone for understanding mathematical thinking. Tracing a path from Pythagoras, whose great Theorem led inexorably to a discovery that his followers tried in vain to keep secret (the existence of irrational numbers); through Descartes and Leibniz; to the brilliant, haunted Georg Cantor, who proved that infinity can come in different sizes, the Kaplans show how the attempt to grasp the ungraspable embodies the essence of mathematics. The Kaplans guide us through the "Republic of Numbers," where we meet both its upstanding citizens and more shadowy dwellers; and we travel across the plane of geometry into the unlikely realm where parallel lines meet. Along the way, deft character studies of great mathematicians (and equally colorful lesser ones) illustrate the opposed yet intertwined modes of mathematical thinking: the intutionist notion that we discover mathematical truth as it exists, and the formalist belief that math is true because we invent consistent rules for it.
    "Less than All," wrote William Blake, "cannot satisfy Man." The Art of the Infinite shows us some of the ways that Man has grappled with All, and reveals mathematics as one of the most exhilarating expressions of the human imagination.

  • Kurt Gödel: Collected Works: Volume II: Publications 1938-1974

    Kurt Godel (1906 - 1978) was the most outstanding logician of the twentieth century, famous for his hallmark works on the completeness of logic, the incompleteness of number theory, and the consistency of the axiom of choice and the continuum hypothesis. He is also noted for his work on constructivity, the decision problem, and the foundations of computability theory, as well as for the strong individuality of his writings on the philosophy of mathematics. He is less well known for his discovery of unusual cosmological models for Einstein's equations, in theory permitting time travel into the past. The Collected Works is a landmark resource that draws together a lifetime of creative thought and accomplishment. The first two volumes were devoted to Godel's publications in full (both in original and translation), and the third volume featured a wide selection of unpublished articles and lecture texts found in Godel's Nachlass. These long-awaited final two volumes contain Godel's correspondence of logical, philosophical, and scientific interest. Volume IV covers A to G, with H to Z in volume V; in addition, Volume V contains a full inventory of Godel's Nachlass. All volumes include introductory notes that provide extensive explanatory and historical commentary on each body of work, English translations of material originally written in German (some transcribed from the Gabelsberger shorthand), and a complete bibliography of all works cited. Kurt Godel: Collected Works is designed to be useful and accessible to as wide an audience as possible without sacrificing scientific or historical accuracy. The only comprehensive edition of Godel's work available, it will be an essential part of the working library of professionals and students in logic, mathematics, philosophy, history of science, and computer science and all others who wish to be acquainted with one of the great minds of the twentieth century.

  • The Ismailis in the Middle Ages: A History of Survival, a Search for Salvation

    In the thirteenth century, an edict of the Mongol warlord Genghis Khan ordained that the Ismaili Muslims, who had hitherto resisted all attempts at subjugation, be utterly destroyed. Shafique Virani examines the most obscure portion of this period, from the mid-thirteenth century to the end of the fifteenth century.

  • The Pride of Havana: A History of Cuban Baseball

    From the first amateur leagues of the 1860s to the exploits of Livan and Orlando "El Duque" Hernandez, here is the definitive history of baseball in Cuba. Roberto Gonzalez Echevarria expertly traces the arc of the game, intertwining its heroes and their stories with the politics, music, dance, and literature of the Cuban people. What emerges is more than a story of balls and strikes, but a richly detailed history of Cuba told from the unique cultural perch of the baseball diamond. Filling a void created by Cuba's rejection of bullfighting and Spanish hegemony, baseball quickly became a crucial stitch in the complex social fabric of the island. By the early 1940s Cuba had become major conduit in spreading the game throughout Latin America, and a proving ground for some of the greatest talent in all of baseball, where white major leaguers and Negro League players from the U.S. all competed on the same fields with the cream of Latin talent. Indeed, readers will be introduced to several black ballplayers of Afro-Cuban descent who played in the Major Leagues before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier once and for all. Often dramatic, and always culturally resonant, Gonzalez Echevarria's narrative expertly lays open the paradox of fierce Cuban independence from the U.S. with Cuba's love for our national pastime. It shows how Fidel Castro cannily associated himself with the sport for patriotic p.r.--and reveals that his supposed baseball talent is purely mythical. Based on extensive primary research and a wealth of interviews, the colorful, often dramatic anecdotes and stories in this distinguished book comprise the most comprehensive history of Cuban baseball yet published and ultimately adds a vital lost chapter to the history of baseball in the U.S.

  • Understanding Vineyard Soils

    Terroir connotes a sense of place that imparts a distinctive character to wine. A central component of terroir is the soil and its immediate surroundings. Thus, an understanding of the basic properties of soils and how they function as a "living skin" on the earth's surface is of fundamental importance to grape growers and winemakers. Stripped of scientific jargon, Understanding Vineyard Soils explains to a wide audience how soils form and why they are so variable. Robert White describes essential chemical and physical processes involving nutrients, water, oxygen and carbon dioxide, moderated by the activities of soil organisms, and proposes remedies to alleviate adverse conditions such as soil acidity, compaction, poor drainage and salinity. The pros and cons of organic viticulture are discussed, as are the possible impacts of climate change. The author explains how sustainable wine production requires grape growers and winemakers to take care of the soil and minimize the impact of their activities on the environment. This book is a practical guide for viticulturists and for the lay reader who is seeking general information about soils, but who may also wish to pursue in more depth the influence of different soil types on vine performance and wine character. Understanding Vineyard Soils will discuss new developments, especially in precision viticulture and organic viticulture. The introduction will address new technologies (near and remote sensing, digital soil mapping) as well as traditional soil classification. Following a chapter on site selection are the three core chapters on vineyard and soil management - The Nutrition of Grapevines, Where the Vine Roots Live, and The Living Soil. The book is written from an international perspective - the important points discussed in Chapters 1 through 6 are illustrated with examples drawn from many wine regions around the world.

  • The Complete Guide to Relieving Cancer Pain and Suffering

    Dr. Richard B. Patt, one of America's leading cancer pain experts, teams up with science writer Susan Lang to produce a much-needed, sensible handbook for patients and caregivers on all aspects of cancer pain. The authors illuminate the reasons why patients are so often undermedicated, including unfounded fears of addiction, patients thinking they need to tough it out, time-consuming paperwork for doctors who prescribe narcotics, and laws that fail to distinguish between drug abuse and the legitimate employment of narcotics. Lang and Patt demonstrate that properly medicated patients are better able to resume active lives and marshal strength to fight their disease - while those in chronic pain not only suffer, but also may jeopardise their potential for recovery. A Complete Guide to Relieving Cancer Pain and Suffering enables cancer patients to make informed decisions about their care and gives numerous, concrete suggestions on how patients and their families can work most efficiently and effectively with doctors. This volume will be of enormous value to the growing numbers of patients, family members, and health-care professionals who are determined to relieve needless cancer pain.

  • Defending Humanity: When Force is Justified and Why

    In Defending Humanity, internationally acclaimed legal scholars George P. Fletcher and Jens David Ohlin tackle one of the most important and controversial questions of our time: When is war justified? When a nation is attacked, few would deny that it has the right to respond with force. But what about preemptive and preventive wars, or crossing another state's border to stop genocide? Was Israel justified in initiating the Six Day War, and was NATO's intervention in Kosovo legal? What about the U.S. invasion of Iraq? In their provocative new book, Fletcher and Ohlin offer a groundbreaking theory on the legality of war with clear guidelines for evaluating these interventions. The authors argue that much of the confusion on the subject stems from a persistent misunderstanding of the United Nations Charter. The Charter appears to be very clear on the use of military force: it is only allowed when authorized by the Security Council or in self-defense. Unfortunately, this has led to the problem of justifying force when the Security Council refuses to act or when self-defense is thought not to apply--and to the difficult dilemma of declaring such interventions illegal or ignoring the U.N. Charter altogether. Fletcher and Ohlin suggest that the answer lies in going back to the domestic criminal law concepts upon which the U.N. Charter was originally based, in particular, the concept of "legitimate defense," which encompasses not only self-defense but defense of others. Lost in the English-language version of the Charter but a vital part of the French and other non-English versions, the concept of legitimate defense will enable political leaders, courts, and scholars to see the solid basis under international law for states to intervene with force--not just to protect themselves against an imminent attack but also to defend other national groups.

  • The Mythology of North America

    The growing economic and political influence of Native American tribes has brought religious issues, once little noted, increasingly to the fore. Timeless in their basic structures, the continent's principal myths are now emerging as sacred histories that have contemporary significance. In this wide-ranging volume, John Bierhorst carefully delineates eleven mythological regions--from the Arctic to the Southwest and from California to the East Coast--presenting the gods, heroes, and primary myths of each area. First published in 1985, this indispensable guide has been updated to reflect the latest scholarship in Native studies. In a new Afterword, Bierhorst describes the recent impact of ancient myths in the arena of American Indian affairs and shows how Native Americans have successfully used mythology as oral evidence to reclaim land rights and to repatriate grave goods. Citing specific cases, he shows how new legislation and changing attitudes "have provided a basis for bringing myth to the negotiating table and into the courtroom." Detailed maps show tribal locations and the distribution of key stories. Indian artworks illustrate the texts and samples of differing narrative styles add enrichment, as some of the world's purest and most powerful myths are made more accessible--and more meaningful--than ever before.

  • Chaco Canyon: Archeologists Explore the Lives of an Ancient Society

    Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, has been called the Stonehenge of North America. Its spectacular pueblos, or great houses, are world famous and have attracted the attention of archaeologists for more than a century. Beautifully illustrated with color and black-and-white photographs, Chaco Canyon draws on the very latest research on Chaco and its environs to tell the remarkable story of the people of the canyon, from foraging bands and humble farmers to the elaborate society that flourished between the tenth and twelfth centuries A.D. Brian Fagan is a master story teller, and he weaves the latest discoveries into a compelling narrative of people living in a harsh, unpredictable environment. Indeed, this is not a story about artifacts and dusty digs, but a riveting narrative of people in the distant past, going about their daily business, living and dying, loving, raising children, living in plenty and in hunger, pondering the cosmos, and facing the unpredictable challenges of the environment. Drawing on rare access to the records of the Chaco Synthesis Project, Fagan reveals a society where agriculture and religion went hand-in-hand, where the ritual power of Chaco's leaders drew pilgrims from distant communities bearing gifts. He describes the lavish burials in the heart of Pueblo Bonito, which offer clues about the identity of Chaco's shadowy leaders. And he explores the enduring mystery of Chaco's sudden decline in the face of savage drought and shows how its legacy survives into modern times. Here then is the first authoritative account of the Chaco people written for a general audience, lending a fascinating human face to one of America's most famous archaeological sites.

  • Photonics: Optical Electronics in Modern Communications

    This textbook is designed for senior undergraduate and first year graduate students in eletrical engineering departments taking photonics, optoelectronics or optical communications courses. The text covers key subjects in optical electronics and their applications in modern optical communications where optical waves are used as carriers of information for local and long distance transmission. This new edition of Amnon Yariv's classic titles offers more explanations of mathematical derivations to help undergraduate students, and focuses more on course topics than on research applications. This book is part of the Oxford Series in Electrical and Computer Engineering (OSECE).

  • Harry A. Blackmun: The Outsider Justice

    Justice Harry A. Blackmun, author of the majority opinion in Roe v. Wade, was the pivotal figure in one of the most contentious decisions in Supreme Court history and indeed the most divisive issue facing the Court today. Harry A. Blackmun: The Outsider Justice is Tinsley E. Yarbrough's penetrating account of one of the most outspoken and complicated figures on the modern Supreme Court. As a justice, Blackmun stood at the pinnacle of the American judiciary. Yet when he took his seat on the Court, Justice Blackmun felt "almost desperate," overwhelmed with feelings of self-doubt and inadequacy over the immense responsibilities before him. Blackmun had overcome humble roots to achieve a Harvard education, success as a Minneapolis lawyer and resident counsel to the prestigious Mayo Clinic. But growing up in a financially unstable home with a frequently unemployed father and an emotionally fragile mother left a permanent mark on the future justice. All his life, Harry Blackmun considered himself one of society's outsiders, someone who did not "belong." Remarkably, though, that very self-image instilled in the justice, throughout his career, a deep empathy for society's most vulnerable outsiders-women faced with unwanted pregnancies, homosexuals subjected to archaic laws, and ultimately, death-row inmates. To those who saw his career as the constitutional "odyssey" of a conservative jurist gradually transformed into a champion of the underdog, Blackmun had a ready answer: he had not changed; the Court and the issues before them changed. Drawing on considerable archival research and a wealth of knowledge of Supreme Court history, Yarbrough has written a nuanced and deeply insightful account of the life and career of one of the court's most intriguing justices.

  • Xenophon's Anabasis, or The Expedition of Cyrus

    Xenophon's Anabasis, or The Expedition of Cyrus, is one of the most exciting historical narratives--as well as the most important autobiographical work--to have survived from ancient Greece. It tells the story of Cyrus, a young and charismatic Persian prince, who in 401 BC enlisted more than ten thousand Greek mercenaries in an attempt to seize the vast Persian empire for himself. Cyrus was killed in a great battle, most of the Greek commanders subsequently fell victim to treachery, and an Athenian aristocrat by the name of Xenophon found himself in the unexpected position of taking charge and leading the Greeks from the vicinity of Babylon in modern Iraq back to the Greek cities in Turkey. This book both places the Anabasis in its historical and literary context and, by employing a variety of critical methods, opens up for the reader different ways of interpreting its major themes. Interrelated chapters investigate Xenophon's self-representation as a model leader, his possible didactic and apologetic purposes for writing, the generic expectations of his contemporary audience, the factual accuracy of the Anabasis, and the ways in which the gods are depicted as intervening in human affairs. This book unveils the literary artistry and narrative strategies that have gone into shaping one of the greatest survival stories of all time.

  • Water Music: Making Music in the Spas of Europe and North America

    Many of the most famous composers in classical music spent considerable periods in spa towns, whether taking in the waters, or searching for patrons among the rich and influential clientele who frequented these pioneer resorts, or soaking up the relaxing and decadent ambience of these enchanted and magical places. At Baden bei Wein, Mozart wrote his Ave Verum Corpus, and Beethoven sketched out his Ninth Symphony. Johannes Brahms spent 17 summers in Baden-Baden, where he stayed in his own specially-built composing cavern and consorted with Clara Schumann. Berlioz came to conduct in Baden-Baden for nine seasons, writing his last major work, Beatrice and Benedict, for the town's casino manager. Chopin, Liszt, and Dvorak were each regular visitors to Carlsbad and Marienbad. And it was in Carlsbad that Beethoven met Goethe. Concerts, recitals, and resident orchestras have themselves played a major role in the therapeutic regimes and the social and cultural life of European and North American watering places since the late eighteenth century. To this day, these spa towns continue to host major music festivals of the highest caliber, drawing musicians and loyal audiences on both local and international levels. This book explores the music making that went on in the spas and watering places in Europe and the United States during their heyday between the early- eighteenth and the mid-twentieth centuries. Music was a hugely important part of the experience of taking a spa cure. Bands played during the early morning and late afternoon while people took the waters and bathed. Spa orchestras and ensembles entertained those gathering socially or resting in assembly rooms, pump rooms and in gardens and parks. In the evenings spa guests enjoyed concerts, visits to the theatre, balls, dances and gambling sessions at the casino, at all of which music played a major role. Expert author Ian Bradley draws on original archival material and the diaries and letters of composers. His book ranges chronologically and geographically, beginning with Bath and Baden near Vienna, which both flourished in the eighteenth century, continuing through Baden-Baden, the Bohemian spas and Bad Ischl in the nineteenth century and on to Buxton and Saratoga Springs which saw their glory days in the early twentieth century. A concluding chapter brings the subject up to date with a review of the musical activities taking place in spa towns today and of the music that accompanies treatments in modern spas, now so ubiquitous and so important and growing a feature in the booming world of leisure, tourism, health and well-being.

  • International Encyclopedia of Linguistics: 4 volumes: print and e-reference editions available

    Comprising more than one million words, the 2nd edition of the International Encyclopedia of Linguistics encompasses the full range of the contemporary field of linguistics, including such areas as historical, comparative, formal, mathematical, functional, and philosophical linguistics. Special attention is given to interrelations within branches of linguistics and to relations of linguistics with other disciplines. Areas of intersection with the social and behavioral sciences-ethnolinguistics, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, and behavioral linguistics-receive major coverage, as does interdisciplinary work in language and literature, mathematical linguistics, computational linguistics, and applied linguistics (particularly as it is concerned with language education). The International Encyclopedia of Linguistics is available in four print volumes and as an e-reference edition at www.oxford-linguistics.com. Longer entries in the International Encyclopedia of Linguistics, ranging up to four thousand words, survey the major fields of study-for example, anthropological linguistics, history of linguistics, semantics, and phonetics. Shorter entries treat specific topics within these fields, such as code switching, sound symbolism, and syntactic features. Other short entries define and discuss technical terms used within the various subfields or provide sketches of the careers of important scholars in the history of linguistics, such as Leonard Bloomfield, Roman Jakobson, and Edward Sapir. Line drawings, maps, tables, and diagrams are generously employed to illustrate the text of many articles. A major emphasis of the work is its extensive coverage of languages and language families. From those as familiar as English, Japanese, and the Romance languages to Hittite, Yoruba, and Nahuatl, languages from all corners of the world receive treatment. Languages that are the subject of independent entries are analyzed in terms of their phonology, grammatical features, syntax, and writing systems. Language lists attached to each article on a language group or family enumerate all languages, extinct or still spoken, within that group and provide detailed information on the number of known speakers, geographical range, and degree of intelligibility with other languages in the group. In this way, virtually every known language receives coverage. For ease of reference and to aid research, the articles are alphabetically arranged, each signed by the contributor, supported by up-to-date bibliographies, and readily accessible via a system of cross-references and a detailed index and synoptic outline. Authoritative, comprehensive, and innovative, the 2nd edition of the International Encyclopedia of Linguistics will be an indispensable addition to personal, public, academic, and research libraries and will introduce a new generation of readers to the complexities and concerns of this field of study.

  • The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings

    Featuring vibrant full color throughout, this new edition of Bart Ehrman's highly successful introduction approaches the New Testament from a consistently historical and comparative perspective, emphasizing the rich diversity of the earliest Christian literature. Rather than shying away from the critical problems presented by these books, Ehrman addresses the historical and literary challenges they pose, showing why scholars continue to argue over such significant issues as how the books of the New Testament came into being, when they were written (and by whom), what they mean, how they relate to contemporary Christian and non-Christian literature, and how they came to be collected into the canon of scripture that we now call the New Testament. Distinctive to this study is its unique focus on the historical, literary, and religious milieux of the Greco-Roman world, including early Judaism. As part of its historical orientation, the book also discusses works by other Christian writers who were roughly contemporary with the New Testament, such as the Gospel of Thomas, the Apocalypse of Peter, and the letters of Ignatius. The text is enhanced by maps, timelines, an extensive text box program, and more than one hundred photos. An accompanying Instructor's Manual contains chapter summaries, discussion questions, and a test bank. An updated Website Study Guide provides chapter summaries, glossary terms, and self-quizzes for students. New to this edition: * Coverage of new discoveries--including the Gospel of Judas Iscariot--and of recent advances in scholarship * A revised discussion of the history of Palestine and Judaism, which now appears much earlier in the book (Chapter 3), thereby providing students with more background on the development of early Christianity at the outset of their studies * A new photo essay on important Greek manuscripts of the New Testament, ten new text boxes, a revised epilogue, and updated suggestions for further reading * An expanded glossary featuring more than 200 key terms, which are also listed at the end of each chapter in which they appear * Key terms appear in boldface type the first time they are used in each chapter * Vivid full color throughout Ideal for undergraduate and seminary classes in the New Testament, Biblical Studies, and Christian Origins, The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings, Fourth Edition, encourages students to carefully consider the historical issues surrounding these writings.

  • Divine Mirrors: The Virgin Mary in the Visual Arts

    'Divine Mirrors', the catalogue for an exhibition of Marian iconography, examines the relation between sacred imagery and secular identity through a unique selection of paintings, sculpture, rare books, and works on paper. Il Pintoricchio, Mantegna, Durer, Munch, and Leger are among the artists represented; also included in the exhibition are a rare duecento panel painting, illuminated Books of Hours, and a specially commissioned artwork exploring the intersection of sacred imagery and secular identity. An essay by project director Melissa Katz focuses on artistic themes treaded in terms of 'resonance with ordinary women'. A guest essay by Robert Orsi, noted author and Professor of Religious Studies, Indiana University, examines the response of Americans to religious art in museums. Rounding out the text are brief interpretive essays by faculty members covering such topics as Marian iconography in Greco-Roman tradition, European religious practices in non-Western cultures, and envisioning the Virgin's voice in musical composition. The book should appeal both to a general audience and to scholars in religious and art history and women's studies. It also should have a life span well beyond that of teh typical exhibition catalogue.

  • This Side of Doctoring: Reflections from Women in Medicine

    This Side of Doctoring is a collection of over 100 personal essays and poems by female physicians over the last century and a half. Organized into categories such as 'Internship and Residency', 'Mothering and Doctoring', 'Making Choices' and 'Barriers', the anthology presents feminine and feminist perspectives on all aspects of a medical career.

  • Innovation Management: Strategies, Implementation, and Profits

    This second edition of Innovation Management provides a systematic approch to the strategies and processes that underlay the financial results of innovation, using multi-functional research from economics, organizational theory, general management and marketing, and the strategy literature. Designed to meet the increasing number of courses in this vitally important area, the book provides full course coverage of innovation management as its core theme. Drawing from his professional and academic experience, Allan Afuah shows the relationshiop between innovation, a management function, and profitability, a financial function. He creates the framework to encompass the basic questions of the "who, what, when, and where of innovation, combining the latest theoretical discussion with abundant examples. This new edition explicitly incorporates the Internet as a technological change and offers an entirely new chapter, Strategies for Sustaning Profits.

  • The Law Market

    When individuals, businesses, or corporations are dissatisfied with an existing law, there are typically two ways it can be fixed: by rewriting the law via political mechanisms or simply physically relocating to a more favorable jurisdiction. Both can be costly and time-consuming. This book explores a new way of looking at law, not as something that can be changed only through cumbersome political and legislative processes or avoided by physical movement, but as something that can be shopped for in a market. To a significant extent this perspective on the law is already a reality. Wherever they may be located, corporations are free to choose in which state to incorporate (often Delaware) and online shoppers from one state or country who buy from a company located in another state or country usually agree to provisions that dictate the law governing the transaction from yet another state or country. Disconnecting the choice of law from the location of activities creates a market for law that allows the involved parties to choose which jurisdiction will apply to their relationship, contract, or dispute. The resulting law markets, Ribstein and O'Hara argue, can work to increase efficiency, create better laws, and ensure that laws in all jurisdictions serve the interests of those they govern.

  • Brave New Words: The Oxford Dictionary of Science Fiction

    The first historical dictionary devoted to science fiction, Brave New Words:The Oxford Dictionary of Science Fiction shows exactly how science-fictional words and their associated concepts have developed over time, with full citations and bibliographic information. It's a window on a whole genre of literature through the words invented and passed along by the genre's most talented writers. In addition, it shows how many words we consider everyday vocabulary-words like "space shuttle," "blast off," and "robot"-had their roots in imaginative literature, and not in hard science. Citations are included for each definition, starting with the earliest usage that can be found. These citations are drawn not only from science fiction books and magazines, but also from mainstream publications, fanzines, screenplays, newspapers, comics, folk songs, and the Internet. In addition to illustrating the different ways each word has been used, citations also show when and where words have moved out of the science fiction lexicon and into that of other subcultures or mainstream English. Brave New Words covers the shared language of science fiction, as well as the vocabulary of science fiction criticism and its fans--those terms that are used by many authors in multiple settings. Words coined in science fiction have become part of the vocabulary of any number of subcultures and endeavors, from comics, to neo-paganism, to aerospace, to computers, to environmentalism, to zine culture. This is the first book to document this vocabulary transfer. Not just a useful reference and an entertaining browse, this book also documents the enduring legacy of science fiction writers and fans.

  • The Old Scofield® Study Bible, KJV, Pocket Edition, Zipper Duradera Black

    This handy Bible is available in eye-catching binding styles at extremely attractive prices. Its compact size makes it easy to fit into a purse or attache case. Commuters, people engaged in evangelism or hospital visitors will appreciate the Pocket Edition. It's a highly portable, yet full-featured study Bible. The classic King James Version translation is matched to Dr. C.I. Scofield's time-honored study system, with book introductions, center column subject chain references, chronologies, same-page text helps and more. * The re-introduction of a popular binding style * A highly portable, yet full-featured study Bible that slips easily into a purse or attache. * Words of Christ in Red Letter type.

  • Thomas Jefferson

    Thomas Jefferson designed his own tombstone, describing himself simply as "Author of the Declaration of Independence and of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, and Father of the University of Virginia." It is in this simple epitaph that R.B. Bernstein finds the key to this enigmatic Founder--not as a great political figure, but as leader of "a revolution of ideas that would make the world over again." In Thomas Jefferson, Bernstein offers the definitive short biography of this revered American--the first concise life in six decades. Bernstein deftly synthesizes the massive scholarship on his subject into a swift, insightful, evenhanded account. Here are all of Jefferson's triumphs, contradictions, and failings, from his luxurious (and debt-burdened) life as a Virginia gentleman to his passionate belief in democracy, from his tortured defense of slavery to his relationship with Sally Hemings. Jefferson was indeed multifaceted--an architect, inventor, writer, diplomat, propagandist, planter, party leader--and Bernstein explores all these roles even as he illuminates Jefferson's central place in the American enlightenment, that "revolution of ideas" that did so much to create the nation we know today. Together with the less well-remembered points in Jefferson's thinking--the nature of the Union, his vision of who was entitled to citizenship, his dread of debt (both personal and national)--they form the heart of this lively biography. In this marvel of compression and comprehension, we see Jefferson more clearly than in the massive studies of earlier generations. More important, we see, in Jefferson's visionary ideas, the birth of the nation's grand sense of purpose.

  • U.S. Diplomacy Since 1900

    Interest in U.S. foreign relations has soared to great heights in the early twenty-first century. Long admired as the most comprehensive and accessible American diplomacy survey available, U.S. Diplomacy Since 1900 has never been more relevant. Now in its sixth edition, the book chronicles the major events in the history of U.S. foreign relations, from the Spanish-American-Philippine War to the present. In this engaging narrative, Robert D. Schulzinger discusses public ideas about foreign relations and explains how U.S. foreign policy is made; he places U.S. foreign relations in the context of the growing interdependence and globalization of international affairs. Updated to include a complete account of the second Bush administration, the new edition also addresses the developments that both preceded and followed the 9/11 terrorist attacks. In the aftermath of this violence, Schulzinger considers whether the U.S. has become an empire and, if so, how that empire is defined. The sixth edition also provides updated, streamlined, and enhanced material throughout and features an array of vibrant new photographs. In this dynamic text, students will encounter the latest scholarship in the history of international affairs, which incorporates valuable insights from related disciplines in the social sciences and humanities--including work on gender, race, ethnicity, and intellectual history. Distinguished by its combination of narrative and analysis and by its in-depth explanations of how and why policy is created, U.S. Diplomacy Since 1900, Sixth Edition, is an invaluable resource for students of diplomatic history, foreign relations, and political science.

  • Home Rule: An Irish History, 1800-2000

    Decimated by famine and emigration, and divided by Irish rule, the people of Ireland sought unity in Home Rule. This idea bound together the varieties of Irish nationalism. It has united British and Irish politicians in the quest for an agreed settlement in Ireland; it has linked Ulster Unionists and Irish Nationalists. In this book, Alvin Jackson examines the development of Home Rule and devolution in Ireland from the 19th century to the present, with a focus on high politics. He traces some of the main themes in Irish peacemaking from the late Victorian period to the beginning of the millennium, including the Good Friday Agreement. Drawing on new archival evidence, Jackson presents a balanced view of Irish political history and contemporary affairs.

  • A Passion for Nature: The Life of John Muir

    "I am hopelessly and forever a mountaineer," John Muir wrote. "Civilization and fever and all the morbidness that has been hooted at me has not dimmed my glacial eye, and I care to live only to entice people to look at Nature's loveliness. My own special self is nothing." In Donald Worster's magisterial biography, John Muir's "special self" is fully explored as is his extraordinary ability, then and now, to get others to see the sacred beauty of the natural world. A Passion for Nature is the most complete account of the great conservationist and founder of the Sierra Club ever written. It is the first to be based on Muir's full private correspondence and to meet modern scholarly standards. Yet it is also full of rich detail and personal anecdote, uncovering the complex inner life behind the legend of the solitary mountain man. It traces Muir from his boyhood in Scotland and frontier Wisconsin to his adult life in California right after the Civil War up to his death on the eve of World War I. It explores his marriage and family life, his relationship with his abusive father, his many friendships with the humble and famous (including Theodore Roosevelt and Ralph Waldo Emerson), and his role in founding the modern American conservation movement. Inspired by Muir's passion for the wilderness, Americans created a long and stunning list of national parks and wilderness areas, Yosemite most prominent among them. Yet the book also describes a Muir who was a successful fruit-grower, a talented scientist and world-traveler, a doting father and husband, a self-made man of wealth and political influence. A man for whom mountaineering was "a pathway to revelation and worship." For anyone wishing to more fully understand America's first great environmentalist, and the enormous influence he still exerts today, Donald Worster's biography offers a wealth of insight into the passionate nature of a man whose passion for nature remains unsurpassed.

  • The Specter of Speciesism: Buddhist and Christian Views of Animals

    This new study looks at how non-human animals have been viewed in the Buddhist and Christian religious traditions. The concept of speciesism, coined in 1970 as an analogy to racism and discussed almost exclusively within philosophical circles, is used to explore very basic questions about which animals, human or otherwise, were significant to early Buddhists and Christians. Drawing on scriptures and interpretive traditions in Christianity and Buddhism, Waldau argues that decisions about human ethical responsibilities in both religions are deeply rooted in ancient understandings of the place of humans in the world and our relationships with other animals in an integrated cosmos. His study offers scholars and others interested in the bases for ethical decisions new insights into Christian and Buddhist reasoning about animals as well as what each might have to offer to the current discussions about animal rights and environmental ethics.

  • Puccini: His Life and Works

    Julian Budden, one of the world's foremost scholars of Italian opera and author of a monumental three-volume study of Verdi's works, now offers music lovers a major new biography of one of the giants of Italian opera, Giacomo Puccini. Blending astute musical analysis with a colorful account of Puccini's life, here is an illuminating look at some of the most popular operas in the repertoire, including Manon Lescaut, La Boheme, Tosca, Madama Butterfly, and Turandot. Budden provides an illuminating look at the process of putting an opera together, the cut-and-slash of nineteenth-century Italian opera--the struggle to find the right performers for the debut of La Boheme, Puccini's anxiety about completing Turandot (he in fact died of cancer before he did so), his animosity toward his rival Leoncavallo (whom he called Leonasino or "lion-ass"). Budden provides an informative analysis of the operas themselves, examining the music act by act. He highlights, among other things, the influence of Wagner on Puccini--alone among his Italian contemporaries, Puccini followed Wagner's example in bringing the motif into the forefront of his narrative, sometimes voicing the singer's unexpressed thoughts, sometimes sending out a signal to the audience of which the character is unaware. And Budden also paints an intriguing portrait of Puccini the man--talented but modest, a man who had friends from every walk of life: shopkeepers, priests, wealthy landowners, fellow artists. Affable, well mannered, gifted with a broad sense of fun, he rarely failed to charm all who met him. A new volume in the esteemed Master Musicians series, Puccini offers a masterful portrait of this beloved Italian composer.

  • Great Physicists: The Life and Times of Leading Physicists from Galileo to Hawking

    Here is a lively history of modern physics, as seen through the lives of thirty men and women from the pantheon of physics. William H. Cropper vividly portrays the life and accomplishments of such giants as Galileo and Isaac Newton, Marie Curie and Ernest Rutherford and Albert Einstein, right up to contemporary figures such as Richard Feynman, Murray Gell-Mann, and Stephen Hawking. We meet scientists, all geniuses, who could be gregarious, aloof, unpretentious, friendly, dogged, imperious, generous to colleagues, or contentious rivals. Cropper also offers vivid portraits of their great moments of discovery, their bitter feuds, their relations with family and friends, their religious beliefs and education. In addition, since scientists in a particular field often inspire those who follow, Cropper has grouped these biographies by discipline mechanics, thermodynamics, particle physics, and so on each section beginning with a historical overview. Marie Curie and Ernes Our understanding of the physical world has increased dramatically in the last four centuries, starting with Galileo and his telescope and stretching to Stephen Hawking's work on black holes and cosmology. With Great Physicists, readers can retrace the footsteps of the men and women who led the way. t Rutherford and Albert

  • Robust Design: A Repertoire of Biological, Ecological, and Engineering Case Studies

    Robust Design brings together 16 chapters by an eminent group of authors in a wide range of fields presenting aspects of robustness in biological, ecological, and computational systems. The volume is the first to address robustness in biological, ecological, and computational systems. It is an outgrowth of a new research program on robustness at the Sante Fe Institute founded by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. For those interested in complexity or interdisciplinary science, robustness is seen as currently among the most intellectually active and promising research areas with important applications in all fields of science, business, and economics.

  • Maconochie's Gentlemen: The Story of Norfolk Island and the Roots of Modern Prison Reform

    In 1840, Alexander Maconochie, a privileged retired naval captain, became at his own request superintendent of two thousand twice-convicted prisoners on Norfolk Island, a thousand miles off the coast of Australia. In four years, Maconochie transformed what was one of the most brutal convict settlements in history into a controlled, stable, and productive environment that achieved such success that upon release his prisoners came to be called "Maconochie's Gentlemen". Here Norval Morris, one of our most renowned criminologists, offers a highly inventive and engaging account of this early pioneer in penal reform, enhancing Maconochie's life story with a trenchant policy twist. Maconochie's life and efforts on Norfolk Island, Morris shows, provide a model with profound relevance to the running of correctional institutions today. Using a unique combination of fictionalized history and critical commentary, Morris gives this work a powerful policy impact lacking in most standard academic accounts. In an era of "mass incarceration" that rivals that of the settlement of Australia, Morris injects the question of humane treatment back into the debate over prison reform. Maconochie and his "Marks system" played an influential role in the development of prisons; but for the last thirty years prison reform has been dominated by punitive and retributive sentiments, the conventional wisdom holding that we need 'supermax' prisons to control the 'worst of the worst' in solitary and harsh conditions. Norval Morris argues to the contrary, holding up the example of Alexander Maconochie as a clear-cut alternative to the "living hell" of prison systems today.

  • How Doctors Think: Clinical judgment and the practice of medicine

    How Doctors Think defines the nature and importance of clinical judgement. Although physicians make use of science, this book argues that medicine is not itself a science but rather an interpretive practice that relies on clinical reasoning. A physician looks at the patient's history along with the presenting physical signs and symptoms and juxtaposes these with clinical experience and empirical studies to construct a tentative account of the illness. How Doctors Think is divided into four parts. Part One introduces the concept of medicine as a practice rather than a science; Part Two discusses the idea of causation; Part Three delves into the process of forming clinical judgement; and Part Four considers clinical judgement within the uncertain nature of medicine itself. How Doctors Think contends that there can be adverse side effects to assuming that medicine is strictly science, and suggests reducing these by recognizing the vital role of clinical judgement.

  • 1001 Legal Words You Need to Know: The Ultimate Guide to the Language of the Law

    1001 Legal Words You Need to Know explains and illuminates the most difficult and arcane vocabulary any American has to deal with--that of the law. This comprehensive-- but never condescending--guide to the language of the American legal system carefully defines and explains every term, and many entries have supplementary notes and a sample sentence. These notes include information about grammar associated with certain terms, as well as an etymology section usefulin finding the linguistic origins of each term. American and British spellings are differentiated (license vs. licence), as are singular and plural forms (dictum vs. dicta). In addition, the book includes a number of quick mini-guides to legal troubleshooting that include information on understanding wills, trusts, and inheritance, granting someone a power of attorney, understanding contracts, what to do if you're sued, how to choose a lawyer, exploring law school, and enjoying cop and lawyer dramas. The backmatter contains an extensive list of legal aid organizations and a helpful bibliography of books about the law and lawyers for further reading. Written for everyday people who only want to know "the basics," 1001 Legal Words You Need To Know is the perfect size and scope for anyone trying to see through the jargon of the American legal system.

  • Oxford Grammar of Classical Greek

    The Oxford Grammar of Classical Greek gives clear, concise, and easily understood explanations of all the key points of Classical Greek grammar. With additional features such as a glossary of grammatical terms, a vocabulary list covering all the Greek words found in the main text, study tips, and practice exercises to help develop knowledge and gain confidence, this invaluable resource ensures that students have all the support they need to complement their language learning. The Oxford Grammar of Classical Greek also offers hundreds of example sentences illustrating grammatical points, an explanation of literary terms, and a guide to how Classical Greek was pronounced. The first book of grammar dedicated to Classical Greek for students in almost a century, this handy reference will replace existing Greek grammars and help students bring this ancient language to life.

  • Beyond Greed and Fear: Understanding Behavioral Finance and the Psychology of Investing

    This book provides a comprehensive treatment of behavioural finance. With the use of the latest psychological research, Shefrin helps us to understand the human behaviour that guides stock selection, financial services, and corporate financial strategy. He argues that financial practitioners must acknowledge and understand behavioural finance - the application of psychology to financial behaviour - in order to avoid many of the investment pitfalls caused by human error. Shefrin points out the common but costly mistakes that money managers, security analysts, financial planners, investment bankers, and corporate leaders make, so that readers gain valuable insights into their own financial decisions and those of their employees, asset managers, and advisors.

  • Policymaking in the Open Economy: Concepts and Case Studies in Economic Performance

    If a country opens its domestic production to become competitive in the world economy, how do policy choices critically influence its economic performance? This work delves into questions such as this in its analysis of economic policy and financial reform in developing countries. Using detailed case studies of Nigeria and Bolivia, the authors discuss trade agreements, exchange rates, the public sector, and policy reform.

  • Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors

    Curry serves up a delectable history of Indian cuisine, ranging from the imperial kitchen of the Mughal invader Babur to the smoky cookhouse of the British Raj.

    In this fascinating volume, the first authoritative history of Indian food, Lizzie Collingham reveals that almost every well-known Indian dish is the product of a long history of invasion and the fusion of different food traditions. We see how, with the arrival of Portuguese explorers and the Mughal horde, the cooking styles and ingredients of central Asia, Persia, and Europe came to the subcontinent, where over the next four centuries they mixed with traditional Indian food to produce the popular cuisine that we know today. Portuguese spice merchants, for example, introduced vinegar marinades and the British contributed their passion for roast meat. When these new ingredients were mixed with native spices such as cardamom and black pepper, they gave birth to such popular dishes as biryani, jalfrezi, and vindaloo. In fact, vindaloo is an adaptation of the Portuguese dish "carne de vinho e alhos-"-the name "vindaloo" a garbled pronunciation of "vinho e alhos"--and even "curry" comes from the Portuguese pronunciation of an Indian word. Finally, Collingham describes how Indian food has spread around the world, from the curry houses of London to the railway stands of Tokyo, where "karee raisu" (curry rice) is a favorite Japanese comfort food. We even visit Madras Mahal, the first Kosher Indian restaurant, in Manhattan.

    Richly spiced with colorful anecdotes and curious historical facts, and attractively designed with 34 illustrations, 5 maps, and numerous recipes, Curry is vivid, entertaining, and delicious--a feast for food lovers everywhere.

  • Writing and Reporting the News

    Writing and Reporting the News, Third Edition, by Gerald Lanson and Mitchell Stephens provides thorough instructions on writing and reporting and extensive opportunities to apply those instructions. Based on the authors' careers as journalists--and on the experience of dozens of other first-rate reporters--this unique textbook/workbook combination gives students a sense of the challenges, pressures, and rewards of the profession. It supplies hundreds of real-life examples and problems designed to accomplish four goals: * teach a comprehensive set of complex writing and reporting skills * expose students to real-life sources of information * train students to think and act like reporters * help students think about words and how they are used This new edition offers updated examples and enhanced graphics, including the addition of story diagrams and information boxes. A new section covers writing for the Internet, focusing on the medium's specific writing style and on packaging stories for multimedia format. Lanson and Stephens have expanded their discussions concerning "good" and "bad" writing, employing comparative examples to explain the reasons for such categorizations.

  • The Ethics of Environmentally Responsible Health Care

    As the state of the natural world declines, environmentally related health problems will increasingly shape the landscape of human health and disease. The confluence of several global trends - rapid population growth combined with an even more dramatic increase in natural resource consumption - drives ecological deterioration, and this in turn poses serious challenges to health. U.S. medicine and bioethics have too long ignored the relevance of these global trends to health care. This groundbreaking work is a call to attention. It brings bioethics and health care squarely into the 21st century. The book shows how environmental decline relates to human health and to health care practices in the U.S. and other industrialized countries. It outlines the environmental trends that will strongly affect health, and challenges us to see the connections between ways of practicing medicine and the very envrionmental problems that damage ecosystems and make people sick. In addition to philosophical analysis of the converging values of bioethics and environmental ethics, the book offers case studies as well as a number of practical suggestions for moving health care toward sustainability. The exploration of a hypothetical Green Health Center, in particular, offers an intellectual and moral framework for talking about environmental values in health care. Engaging and challenging, this book will appeal not only to health professionals and philosophers, but to anyone concerned about how to preserve and promote both human health and the health of the natural world.

  • Missing and Exploited Children: How to Protect Your Child

    According to the National Crime information Center, nearly 2200 children are reported missing every day. This almanac addresses the various statutes and programs established to protect and rescue children from predators. It also covers parental kidnapping in disputed custody cases, including international abduction. Also included are safety tips and an action plan for parents whose children are missing. The Legal Almanac Series consists of over 75 handy guides for the lay person on all aspects of the law. Each volume includes an overview of the topic followed by chapters on the major issues in that subject. Each volume contains an Appendix containing several primary source documents as well as practical forms and checklists. A Glossary defines any technical terms used in the text.

  • Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings

    Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings is an ideal text for introductory, advanced undergraduate, and graduate courses in the philosophy of mind and related areas. The most comprehensive collection of its kind, this volume ranges from the classical contributions of Descartes to the leading edge of the discipline. Three of the selections are being published here for the first time, while many other articles have been revised especially for this volume. Extensive sections cover foundational issues, the nature of consciousness, the nature of mental content, and miscellaneous issues. Each section opens with an in-depth introduction by the editor.

  • Kansas City Jazz: From Ragtime to Bebop--A History

    There were but four major galaxies in the early jazz universe, and three of them--New Orleans, Chicago, and New York--have been well documented in print. But there has never been a serious history of the fourth, Kansas City, until now. In this colorful history, Frank Driggs and Chuck Haddix range from ragtime to bebop and from Bennie Moten to Charlie Parker to capture the golden age of Kansas City jazz. Readers will find a colorful portrait of old Kaycee itself, back then a neon riot of bars, gambling dens and taxi dance halls, all ruled over by Boss Tom Pendergast, who had transformed a dusty cowtown into the Paris of the Plains. We see how this wide-open, gin-soaked town gave birth to a music that was more basic and more viscerally exciting than other styles of jazz, its singers belting out a rough-and-tumble urban style of blues, its piano players pounding out a style later known as "boogie-woogie." We visit the great landmarks, like the Reno Club, the "Biggest Little Club in the World," where Lester Young and Count Basie made jazz history, and Charlie Parker began his musical education in the alley out back. And of course the authors illuminate the lives of the great musicians who made Kansas City swing, with colorful profiles of jazz figures such as Mary Lou Williams, Big Joe Turner, Jimmy Rushing, and Andy Kirk and his "Clouds of Joy." Here is the definitive account of the raw, hard-driving style that put Kansas City on the musical map. It is a must read for everyone who loves jazz or American music history.

  • The Natural History of Weasels and Stoats: Ecology, Behavior, and Management

    Field naturalists have observed the activities of weasels for centuries. Their descriptions were often accurate but sometimes misinterpreted the animals' behaviors and underlying explanations for those behaviors. "Organized natural history" became one of the roots of the science of ecology in the 1920s and by the 1960s scientists had begun to study the biology of weasels with all the critical, objective advantages of modern theory and equipment. Until the first edition of this book appeared in 1989 no one had attempted to explain these results to non-specialist naturalists. Now thoroughly revised, this book will continue to be the main one-stop reference for professionals. But both kinds of knowledge are brought together here-- observations for the traditional naturalist and rigorous measurements and interpretations for modern scientists, integrated into a single, readable account. This new edition provides a comprehensive summary of the extensive advances over the last 15 years in our knowledge of these fascinating animals. A new U.S.-based co-author reshapes the content to be more U.S.-centric. Stories about North America trappers and backwoodsmen interacting with weasels replace some (not all) of the previous stories about English gamekeepers. These changes permeate the book, so readers familiar with the first edition will recognize some material, but will find a lot that is new. Much less reliable European information quoted in the first edition was there at the time when no better information was available. Now a new NZ chapter focuses on predation problems of the species introduced to that country. This edition, much more than a simple update, is now truly an international treatment and a more valuable resource.

  • Helping Children with Autism Learn: Treatment Approaches for Parents and Professionals

    Children with autistic spectrum disorders have unique learning styles, or "autistic learning disabilities". These pose unique challenges to parents seeking the best educational path for their autistic child, and for educators shaping educational programs for children with autism and related disorders. In Helping Children with Autism Learn, Dr Siegel, a developmental psychologist and director of a large university clinic for autistic children, provides concrete guidance for dealing with these challenges. The book not only enumerates the "autistic learning disabilities", but critiques all of the available educational programs for these children, pointing out the strengths and weaknesses of each program and the appropriateness of a program for specific "disabilities". Helping Children with Autism Learn is structured so that the parent and teacher can use it as a program planner and can evaluate the success and appropriateness of each strategy, refining the program as necessary. Key areas of concentration are language, academic skills, social skills, as well as adapting the child to independence and day-to-day needs. Throughout, Siegel emphasises the need to tailor programs to fit each child's unique needs, and to adapt programs as the child matures and ages. Dr Siegel pulls together a wealth of long-needed information. She provides a superb guide and resource for parents, teachers, clinicians, and other educators who work with autistic children.

  • An Account of Corsica, the Journal of a Tour to That Island, and Memoirs of Pascal Paoli

    This first complete reprint of Boswell's book on Corsica since the eighteenth century is enhanced by comprehensive annotation, textual apparatus, and a critical introduction. Boswell designed his text in two parts: first, an Account of Corsica, which gives a historical, political, socio-economic, and cultural overview of the Corsican people, and second, the Journal of his tour to see the Corsican leader Pascal Paoli in 1765. This edition, unlike so many reprints of just the Journal, allows the reader to appreciate Boswell's original design. The young and adventuresome Boswell wanted to write a book that would swing public opinion, and perhaps the British government, to support the Corsicans in their struggle for independence. He was well aware that his English readers had but the haziest ideas about Corsica gleaned from but snatches of news in the papers. The first part would therefore provide the context within which to understand and appreciate his account of his journey to and meeting with Paoli. The complete text also illustrates aspects of Boswell that have received less attention than they might, namely, his sense of history, his political enthusiasm for national liberty, and his scholarship. He brings to the book a solid foundation in the Classics and the law, a facility in French and Italian, and a sensitivity to writing that, as the notes show, is evident in the reworking of his manuscript. The editors' introduction and the extensive annotation point up Boswell the scholar--assiduous, sedulous to get at the relevant sources, careful to do justice to those he disagreed with, and open about seeking and acknowledging advice. The text reveals Boswell as a serious and independent thinker and a writer committed to Corsica's independence. What he argued for and presumed was about to be achieved is still a matter of debate in Corsica and metropolitan France.

  • Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism, 200 BCE - 400 CE

    The classical Rabbinic tradition (legal, discursive, and exegetical) claims to be the Oral Torah, transmitted by word of mouth in an unbroken chain deriving its authority ultimately from divine revelation to Moses at Sinai. Since the third century CE, however, this tradition has been embodied in written texts. Through judicious deployment and analysis of the evidence, Martin Jaffee is able to show that the Rabbinic tradition, as we have it, developed through a mutual interpretation of oral and written modes. The ideology of the Oral Torah, however - which appeared in its first fully developed form only in the mid-third century CE - was intended to ground talmudic study practices and the authority of the Rabbinic master as the living embodiment of the Torah. Torah, as transformative religious knowledge and praxis, could only be internalized through discipleship to a religious Master within a circle of other disciples; it could not be mastered from a written text which, by itself, was deemed to be religiously inert.

  • A Contemporary Introduction to Free Will

    Accessible to students with no background in the subject, A Contemporary Introduction to Free Will provides an extensive and up-to-date overview of all the latest views on this central problem of philosophy. Opening with a concise introduction to the history of the problem of free will--and its place in the history of philosophy--the book then turns to contemporary debates and theories about free will, determinism, and related subjects like moral responsibility, coercion, compulsion, autonomy, agency, rationality, freedom, and more. Classical compatibilist and new compatibilist theories of free will are considered along with the latest incompatibilist or libertarian theories and the most recent skeptical challenges to free will. Separate chapters are devoted to the relation of free will to moral responsibility and ethics; to modern science; and to religious questions about predestination, divine foreknowledge, and human freedom. Numerous down-to-earth examples and challenging thought experiments enliven the text. The book is an ideal addition to introduction to philosophy, metaphysics, and free will courses.

  • A Life of Sir Francis Galton: From African Exploration to the Birth of Eugenics

    Few scientists have made lasting contributions to as many fields as Francis Galton. He was an important African explorer, travel writer, and geographer. He was the meteorologist who discovered the anticyclone, a pioneer in using fingerprints to identify individuals, the inventor of regression and correlation analysis in statistics, and the founder of the eugenics movement. Now, Nicholas Gillham paints an engaging portrait of this Victorian polymath. The book traces Galton's ancestry (he was the grandson of Erasmus Darwin and the cousin of Charles Darwin), upbringing, training as a medical apprentice, and experience as a Cambridge undergraduate. It recounts in colorful detail Galton's adventures as leader of his own expedition in Namibia. Darwin was always a strong influence on his cousin and a turning point in Galton's life was the publication of the Origin of Species. Thereafter, Galton devoted most of his life to human heredity, using then novel methods such as pedigree analysis and twin studies to argue that talent and character were inherited and that humans could be selectively bred to enhance these qualities. To this end, he founded the eugenics movement which rapidly gained momentum early in the last century. After Galton's death, however, eugenics took a more sinister path, as in the United States, where by 1913 sixteen states had involuntary sterilization laws, and in Germany, where the goal of racial purity was pushed to its horrific limit in the "final solution." Galton himself, Gillham writes, would have been appalled by the extremes to which eugenics was carried. Here then is a vibrant biography of a remarkable scientist as well as a superb portrait of science in the Victorian era.

  • Unpopular Privacy: What Must We Hide?

    Can the government stick us with privacy we don't want? It can, it does, and according to this author, may need to do more of it. Privacy is a foundational good, she argues, a necessary tool in the liberty-lover's kit for a successful life. A nation committed to personal freedom must be prepared to mandate inalienable, liberty-promoting privacies for its people, whether they eagerly embrace them or not. The eight chapters of this book are reflections on public regulation of privacy at home; isolation and confinement for punitive and health reasons; religious modesty attire; erotic nudity; workplace and professional confidentiality; racial privacy; online transactions; social networking; and the collection, use and storage of electronic data. Most books about privacy law focus on rules designed to protect popular forms of privacy. Popular privacy is the kind that people tend to want, believe they have a right to, and expect governments to secure. Typical North Americans and Europeans embrace privacy for home-life, telephone calls, e-mail, health records, and financial transactions. This unique book draws attention to unpopular privacy-- privacies disvalued or disliked by their intended beneficiaries and targets-and the best reasons for imposing them. Examples of unwanted physical and informational privacies with which contemporary Americans have already lived? Start with laws designed to keep website operators from collecting personal information from children under 13 without parental consent; the anti-nudity laws that force strippers to wear pasties and thongs; the 'Don't Ask Don't Tell' rules that kept gays out of the US military; and the myriad employee and professional confidentiality rules-- including insider trading laws-- that require strict silence about matters whose disclosure could earn us small fortunes. Conservative and progressive liberals agree that coercion and paternalism should be the exceptions rather than the rule. Better to educate, incentivize and nudge than to force. But what if people continue to make self-defeating bad choices? What are the exceptional circumstances that warrant coercion, and in particular, coercing privacy? When can government turn privacies into duties, especially duties of self-care? Early modern societies went wrong, imposing unequal conditions of forced modesty and confinement on women and others groups, giving privacy and imposed privacies a bad rap. But now may be a time for imposed privacies of another sort-imposed privacies that are liberating rather than dominating. A role for coercive and paternalistic regulation may be called for in view of the Great Privacy Give-Away. The public turns over vast amounts of personal information in exchange for the ease of online shopping, browsing and social networking, protected in some instances by little more than a pro forma privacy policy pasted on a home page. The public uploads and stores information 'in the cloud,' and have become more and more dependent upon electronic telecommunications and personal archiving exposed to public and private surveillance. Have they lost the taste for privacy? Do they fail to understand the implications of what is happening? This book offers insight into the ethical and political underpinnings of public policies mandating privacies that people may be indifferent to or despise. Privacy institutions and practices play a role in sustaining the capable free-agents presupposed by liberal democracy. Physical sanctuaries and data protection by law confers and preserve opportunities for making and acting on choices. Imposing privacy recognizes the extraordinary importance of dignity, reputation, confidential relationships, and preserving social, economic and political options throughout a lifetime.

  • Breaking Robert's Rules: The New Way to Run Your Meeting, Build Consensus, and Get Results

    Robert's Rules of Order, written more than 150 years ago by a military man, are no longer relevant. America needs a new guide that spells out how to work together effectively in groups of all kinds, one that takes account of recent developments in the field of consensus building and dispute resolution. Enter the concensus-building approach, as introduced and explained in a step-by-step approach using realistic scenarios, by Susskind and Cruickshank.

  • Ovid's Metamorphoses

    Ovid's Metamorphoses have been seen to mark a culmination of the classical epic tradition and a revolutionary transferral of narrative interest from warfare to love and fantasy. This introduction considers how Ovid defined and shaped his narrative, its cultural context, and its vivid depictions of the cruelty of jealous gods, the pathos of human love, and the imaginative fantasy of flight, monsters, magic and illusion. Elaine Fantham provides a stimulating analysis of this marvellous and complex poem, and the traditions it built on and inspired.

  • Transforming Technology: A Critical Theory Revisited

    Thoroughly revised, this new edition of Critical Theory of Technology rethinks the relationships between technology, rationality, and democracy, arguing that the degradation of labor--as well as of many environmental, educational, and political systems--is rooted in the social values that preside over technological development. It contains materials on political theory, but the emphasis has shifted to reflect a growing interest in the fields of technology and cultural studies.

  • ANALYZING BACH CANTATAS

    Bach's cantatas are among the highest achievements of Western musical art, yet studies of the individual cantatas that are both illuminating and detailed are few. In this book, noted Bach expert Eric Chafe combines theological, historical, analytical, and interpretive approaches to the cantatas to offer readers and listeners alike the richest possible experience of these works. A respected theorist of seventeenth-century music, Chafe is sensitive to the composer's intentions and to the enduring and universal qualities of the music itself. Concentrating on a small number of representative cantatas, mostly from the Leipzig cycles of 1723-24 and 1724-25, and in particular on Cantata 77, Chafe shows how Bach strove to mirror both the dogma and the mystery of religious experience in musical allegory. Analyzing Bach Cantatas offers valuable information on the theological relevance of the structure of the liturgical year for the design and content of these works, as well as a survey of the theories of modality that inform Bach's compositional style. Chafe demonstrates that, while Bach certainly employed "pictorialism" and word-painting in his compositions, his method of writing music was a more complex amalgam of theological concepts and music theory. Regarding the cantatas as musical allegories that reflect the fundamental tenets of Lutheran theology as established during Bach's lifetime, Chafe synthesizes a number of key musical and theological ideas to illuminate the essential character of these great works. This unique and insightful book offers an essential methodology for understanding one of the central bodies of work in the Western musical canon. It will prove indispensable for all students and scholars of Bach's work, musicology, and theological studies.

  • American Religions: A Documentary History

    Religion has played a complex, vibrant, and multifaceted role in our nation's history. One of the most effective ways to help students explore its vitality is through primary sources. American Religions: A Documentary History is the only one-volume, up-to-date collection of primary sources available for American religious history courses. Featuring a creative dual structure--the readings are arranged both chronologically and thematically--this indispensable sourcebook can be used in both historically and topically organized courses. Balancing canonical works with those by newly discovered voices, American Religions: A Documentary History includes seventy-five classic and contemporary selections from the colonial period through the present day. It offers readings by a uniquely wide range of religiously, socially, and ethnically diverse writers: theological conservatives and liberals, northerners and southerners, women and men, and African Americans and Mexican Americans alongside Anglo-Americans. The selections are long enough to stimulate serious discussion yet concise enough for students to digest easily. The volume is organized into six sections that cover different chronological periods, each of which contains writings on five themes: theological reflections, ritual and performance, spiritual autobiography, interreligious conflict and negotiation, and more expansive conceptualizations of religion. Enhanced by brief biographies of the authors, a general introduction, and section introductions, the text also includes two sample syllabi--one oriented toward a historical approach and the other toward a thematic approach. Ideal for introductory courses in religion in America and American religious history--taught both in religious studies and history departments--American Religions: A Documentary History offers students a broad yet in-depth and engaging gateway into the subject.

  • Repeated Games and Reputations: Long-Run Relationships

    Personalized and continuing relationships play a central role in any society. Economists have built upon the theories of repeated games and reputations to make important advances in understanding such relationships. Repeated Games and Reputations begins with a careful development of the fundamental concepts in these theories, including the notions of a repeated game, strategy, and equilibrium. Mailath and Samuelson then present the classic folk theorem and reputation results for games of perfect and imperfect public monitoring, with the benefit of the modern analytical tools of decomposability and self-generation. They also present more recent developments, including results beyond folk theorems and recent work in games of private monitoring and alternative approaches to reputations. Repeated Games and Reputations synthesizes and unifies the vast body of work in this area, bringing the reader to the research frontier. Detailed arguments and proofs are given throughout, interwoven with examples, discussions of how the theory is to be used in the study of relationships, and economic applications. The book will be useful to those doing basic research in the theory of repeated games and reputations as well as those using these tools in more applied research.

  • American National Biography: Supplement 2

    Told more as stories than history lessons, the biographies in American National Biography, Supplement 2 recount the tales of all the different people who shaped America--leaders, composers, entertainers, entrepreneurs, writers, scientists, and outlaws. Each one written by an expert in the field and masterfully woven together to present the most accurate and up-to-date information, the entries bring forth a powerful narrative of America's past and some of the most important figures that went into its formation. As the second in a series, Supplement 2 includes a fascinating miscellany of 450 lives, ranging from 19th-century eccentric Joshua Abraham Norton who died in 1880, to President Reagan and Rodney Dangerfield, who died in 2004. Supplement 2 includes hundreds of figures of note from the past not included in the original edition of the ANB or Supplement 1. New biographies not in the original set as well as articles first published in the ANB Online are included in the Supplement. The result is hour after absorbing hour spent exploring the literary worlds of Ken Kesey and Eudora Welty, the music of Tito Puente and Perry Como, numerous statesmen and politicians and many, many others. With over 500 new listings, bibliographies after each entry, and a cumulative revised index of occupations and realms of renown, Supplement 2 continues the ANB tradition of bringing the people who have meant so much to this country to the forefront. Visit www.anb.org for more information

  • The Craft of Ritual Studies

    In religious studies, theory and method research has long been embroiled in a polarized debate over scientific versus theological perspectives. Ronald L. Grimes shows that this debate has stagnated, due in part to a manner of theorizing too far removed from the study of actual religious practices. A worthwhile theory, according to Grimes, must be practice-oriented, and practices are most effectively studied by field research methods. The Craft of Ritual Studies melds together a systematic theory and method capable of underwriting the cross-cultural, interdisciplinary study of ritual enactments. Grimes first exposes the limitations that disable many theories of ritual--for example, defining ritual as essentially religious, assuming that ritual's only function is to generate group solidarity, or treating ritual as a mirror of the status quo. He proposes strategies and offers guidelines for conducting field research on the public performance of rites, providing a guide for fieldwork on complex ritual enactments, particularly those characterized by social conflict or cultural creativity. The volume also provides a section on case study, focusing on a single complex event: the Santa Fe Fiesta, a New Mexico celebration marked by protracted ethnic conflict and ongoing dramatic creativity. Grimes explains how rites interact creatively and critically with their social surroundings, developing such themes as the relation of ritual to media, theater, and film, the dynamics of ritual creativity, the negotiation of ritual criticism, and the impact of ritual on cultural and physical environments. This important and influential book will be the capstone work of Grimes's three decades of leadership in the field of ritual studies. It is accompanied by twenty online appendices illustrating key aspects of ritual study.

  • The Richard Rodgers Reader (Readers on American Musicians)

    Richard Rodgers was one of America's most prolific and best-loved composers. A world without "My Funny Valentine," "The Lady is a Tramp," "Blue Moon," and "Bewitched," to name just a Few of the songs he wrote with Lorenz Hart, is scarcely imaginable, and the musicals he wrote with his second collaborator, Oscar Hammerstein-Oklahoma!, Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I, and The Sound of Music-continue to enchant and entertain audiences. Arranged in four sections, Rodgers and Hart (1929-1943), Rodgers and Hammerstein (1943-1960), Rodgers After Hammerstein (1960-1979), and The Composer Speaks (1939-1971), The Richard Rodgers Reader offers a cornucopia of informative, Perceptive, and stylish biographical and critical overviews. It also contains a selection of Rodgers's letters to his wife. Dorothy in the 1920s, the 1938 Time magazine cover story and New Yorker profiles in 1938 and 1961, and essays and reviews by such noted critics as Brooks Atkinson, Eric Bentley, Leonard Bernstein, Lehman Engel, Walter Kerr, Ken Mandelbaum, Ethan Mordden, George Jean Nathan, and Alec Wilder. The volume Features Personal accounts by Richard Adler, Agnes de Mille, Joshua Logan, Mary Martin, and Diahann Carroll. The collection concludes with complete selections from more than thirty years of Rodgers's own writings on topics ranging from the creative process, the state of the Broadway theater, even Rodgers's bout with cancer, and a generous sample from the candid and previously unpublished Columbia University interviews. For anyone wishing to explore more fully the life. and work of a composer whose songs and musicals have assumed a Permanent-and prominent-place in American popular culture, The Richard Rodgers Reader will offer endless delights.

  • The Vestibular System: A Sixth Sense

    In The Vestibular System: A Sixth Sense, leading experts present an integrative, comprehensive and innovative look at the sense that Aristotle missed. The vestibular system plays a vital role in everyday life, contributing to a surprising range of functions from reflexes to the highest levels of perception and consciousness. This text not only offers a thorough and fresh review of the basicssensory transduction, the neurophysiology of peripheral and central pathwaysand how vestibular signals are processed in the control of gaze and posture; it significantly moves the discussion forward with its attention to the current research and the field's revolutionary advances, such as the understanding of neural correlates of self-motion and the basis of clinical disorders. In addition, the objective presentation of existing controversies is exciting reading and an extremely important contribution to the text's completeness. Dynamic, intellectually challenging, and unique in its level of integration of the material, this book is essential for anyone interested in understanding the vestibular system.

  • Microelectronic Circuits

    The fifth edition of Microelectronic Circuits provides a framework to develop the student's ability to analyze and design all kinds of electronic circuits. Thoroughly updated and revised, this edition features changes that are evident from the condensed table of contents, and a great deal more that are included in the actual chapters. All the revisions, organization, and topical coverage reflect changes in technology-CMOS technology in particular-by far the most significant development in the world of mainstream electrical engineering. Highlights of the Fifth Edition BLEvenly balanced, streamlined organizational structure: -In each chapter, the "must-cover" topics are placed first and the more specialized material appears last. -The first five chapters, Part I, are organized to form a coherent single-semester introductory course in electronics. Similarly, the next five chapters, Part II, present a body of material suitable for a second one-semester course. The final four chapters, Part III, contain significant topics that can be used as enhancements or substitutes for some of the material in earlier chapters, as well as resources for project or thesis work. BLBoth the MOSFET and BJT chapters have been rewritten and updated, and remain independent of each other. The MOSFET coverage is placed first, but the two devices can be covered in any desired order. BLMany more MOS circuit examples, which use numbers that reflect current technology, are provided throughout. BLChapters 6 and 7 have been completely rewritten to introduce ICMOS and bipolar amplifiers in an accessible, systematic way. In addition, frequency response is now covered where necessary (a "just-in-time" approach) rather than being deferred until much later. This includes brief coverage of the frequency responses of the common source and common emitter amplifiers in Chapters 4 and 5, respectively. BLStudent learning support is enhanced by: -Revising summary sections and including many more summary tables. -Increasing the number and variety of review exercises and end-of-chapter problems. -Adding more PSpice(R) examples and problems with schematic captures. -A new in-text student CD including: Free student versions of PSpice(R) and Electronics Workbench Multisim(R) Textbook Edition (SPICE Simulator), new industry-based design examples, and data sheets from major industrial firms. BLInstructor support is enhanced by: -Improved organization, making it easy to select material to suit a variety of course orientations. -A comprehensive typed Solutions Manual, including detailed answers to all problems in the text and overhead masters. -A new CD and web site with PowerPoint(R) slides and Lecture Outlines. -And additional forthcoming ancillaries.

  • Taffanel: Genius of the Flute

    Paul Taffanel (1844 - 1908) is essentially the father of modern flute playing. Drawing on previously unavailable material from a provate archive in Paris, Blakeman describes and evaluates Taffanel's life, career, and works, with particular reference to his influence as founder of the modern French School of flute playing.

  • The Old Scofield® Study Bible, KJV, Pocket Edition, Basketweave Black/Burgundy

    This handy Bible is available in eye-catching binding styles at extremely attractive prices. Its compact size makes it easy to fit into a purse or attache case. Commuters, people engaged in evangelism or hospital visitors will appreciate the Pocket Edition. It's a highly portable, yet full-featured study Bible. The classic King James Version translation is matched to Dr. C.I. Scofield's time-honored study system, with book introductions, center column subject chain references, chronologies, same-page text helps and more. * The re-introduction of a popular binding style * A highly portable, yet full-featured study Bible that slips easily into a purse or attache. * Words of Christ in Red Letter type.

  • Documentary Film: A Very Short Introduction

    Documentary film can encompass anything from Robert Flaherty's pioneering ethnography Nanook of the North to Michael Moore's anti-Iraq War polemic Fahrenheit 9/11, from Dziga Vertov's artful Soviet propaganda piece Man with a Movie Camera to Luc Jacquet's heart-tugging wildlife epic March of the Penguins. In this concise, crisply written guide, Patricia Aufderheide takes readers along the diverse paths of documentary history and charts the lively, often fierce debates among filmmakers and scholars about the best ways to represent reality and to tell the truths worth telling. Beginning with an overview of the central issues of documentary filmmaking--its definitions and purposes, its forms and founders--Aufderheide focuses on several of its key subgenres, including public affairs films, government propaganda (particularly the works produced during World War II), historical documentaries, and nature films. Her thematic approach allows readers to enter the subject matter through the kinds of films that first attracted them to documentaries, and it permits her to make connections between eras, as well as revealing the ongoing nature of documentary's core controversies involving objectivity, advocacy, and bias. Interwoven throughout are discussions of the ethical and practical considerations that arise with every aspect of documentary production. A particularly useful feature of the book is an appended list of "100 great documentaries" that anyone with a serious interest in the genre should see. Drawing on the author's four decades of experience as a film scholar and critic, this book is the perfect introduction not just for teachers and students but also for all thoughtful filmgoers and for those who aspire to make documentaries themselves. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

  • Chasing the High: A Firsthand Account of One Young Person's Experience with Substance Abuse

    In this book for young people who are struggling with substance abuse, Kyle Keegan recounts his own remarkable story of drug abuse and ruthless addiction. Keegan, now an adult who is in recovery from his addiction, discusses his experience as a well adjusted adolescent who fell victim to heroin and whose life was almost destroyed by the devastating drug. Against the backdrop of these experiences, he also provides useful information that young people struggling with substance abuse need, such as how to recognize and accept that there is a problem, how to find professional help, and how to stay happy and healthy in recovery.

  • Country Music Originals: The Legends and the Lost

    In this sparkling collection, "roots" music authority Tony Russell offers vivid portraits of the men and women who created country music, the artists whose lives and songs formed the rich tradition from which Hank Williams, Elvis Presley, Bob Dylan, The Dixie Chicks, and so many others have drawn their inspiration. Included here are not only such major figures as Jimmie Rodgers, The Carter Family, Fiddlin' John Carson, Charlie Poole, and Gene Autry, who put country music on America's cultural map in the 1920s and '30s, but many fascinating lesser-known figures as well, such as Carson Robison, Otto Gray, Chris Bouchillon, Emry Arthur and dozens more, many of whose stories are told here for the first time. To map some of the winding, untraveled roads that connect today's music to its ancestors, Russell draws upon new research and rare source material, such as contemporary newspaper reports and magazine articles, internet genealogy sites, and his own interviews with the musicians or their families. The result is a lively mix of colorful tales and anecdotes, priceless contemporary accounts of performances, illuminating social and historical context, and well-grounded critical judgment. The essays are enhanced by more than 200 illustrations, many of them seldom seen and some never before published, including artist photographs, record labels, song sheets, newspaper clippings, cartoons, advertisements, and magazine covers, recreating the look and feel of the entire culture of country music. Each essay includes as well a playlist of recommended and currently available recordings for each artist. Country Music Originals is a collection of gems which will delight the aficionado and first-time enthusiast as well as the scholar of American folk music.

  • 1979 Book of Common Prayer, Economy Green Leather

    The Oxford Book of Common Prayer, Economy Edition is a beautifully constructed and reasonably-priced prayer book, making it a perfect choice for wide distribution in schools and for use as a pew prayer book. All Oxford Prayer Books are bound with the same attention to detail and commitment to quality that have made Oxford Bibles famous the world over. The Economy Edition includes the Revised Common Lectionary and covers are embossed with an elegant gold cross. Well-constructed, compact, yet comprehensive, this prayer book is an inexpensive and cherished resource for Episcopalians everywhere.

  • Autopsy of a Suicidal Mind

    Autopsy of a Suicidal Mind is a uniquely intensive psychological analysis of a suicidal mind. In this poignant scientific study, Edwin S. Shneidman, a founder of the field of suicidology, assembles an extraordinary cast of eight renowned experts to analyze the suicidal materials, including a ten-page suicide note, given to him by a distraught mother looking for insights into her son's tragic death. The psychological autopsy centers on the interviews conducted by Shneidman with Arthur's mother, father, brother, sister, best friend, ex-wife, girlfriend, psychotherapist, and attending physician.

    To gain some understanding of this man's intense psychological pain and to examine what may have been done to save his tortured life, Shneidman approached the top suicide experts in the country to analyze the note and interviews: Morton Silverman, Robert E. Litman, Jerome Motto, Norman L. Farberow, John T. Maltsberger, Ronald Maris, David Rudd, and Avery D. Weisman. Each of the eight experts offers a unique perspective on Arthur's tragic fate, and the sum of their conclusions constitutes an extraordinary psychological autopsy.

    This book is the first of its kind and a remarkable contribution to the study of suicide. Mental health professionals, students of human nature, and persons whose lives have been touched by this merciless topic will be mesmerized and enlightened by this unique volume. An epistemological tour de force, it will speak to anyone who is concerned with human self-destruction.

  • Financial Decisions in Emerging Markets

    Financial Decisions in Emerging Markets is the first corporate finance book to take into account the context of emerging markets and the problems they present, including the relative lack of market efficiency. It reviews financial theory, with a focus on investment and financing decisions as they relate to investors in emerging markets. The objective of the book is to juxtapose the assumptions of financial theory against the realities prevailing in emerging countries and to propose more relevant approaches for investment analysis. This book provides readers with a solid background to evaluate investments in emerging countries.

  • More Than Belief: A Materialist Theory of Religion

    Over the past several decades, postmodernist and postcolonial challenges to traditional theories and methods have revolutionized the social sciences. The discipline of religious studies, however, has been relatively slow to confront these developments, continuing to rely heavily on textual methods and a framework that privileges belief over practice, doctrine over performance, text over context, and inner emotion over public ritual. Recently, however, developments in social theory have begun to transform the study of religion. In this book, Manuel Vasquez maps out the dynamics of this paradigm shift, exploring systematically the epistemological and methodological challenges contemporary social theory poses for traditional approaches to religious studies. Offering a panoramic view of key debates on identity, culture, and society across the social sciences, he assesses the impact of these debates on the study of religion, offering specific examples of how they are shaping the study of particular religious traditions. He concludes by proposing a robust yet flexible materialist approach to the study of religion that will be capable of addressing the increasing complexity of religious life.

  • Developmental Instability: Causes and Consequences

    This field has generated a large amount of controversy of late, mostly because of fierce rivalry between some of the leading workers in the area. This book pulls together a synthetic overview of the field of developmental instability and fluctuating asymmetry, with the participation of the leading laboratories on both sides of the divide. Thereby creating a much needed synthesis of this timely topic in social evolution, mediating some of the disputes in the field.

  • Psychology for Musicians: Understanding and Acquiring the Skills

    This book provides a concise, accessible, and up-to-date introduction to psychological research for musicians - performers, music educators, and studio teachers. Designed to address the needs and priorities of the performing musician rather than the research community, it reviews the relevant psychological research findings in relation to situations and issues faced by musicians, and draws out practical implications for the practice of teaching and performance. Rather than a list of DOs and DON'Ts, this book equips musicians with an understanding of the basic psychological principles that underlie music performcance, enabling each reader to apply the content flexibly to the task at hand. Following a brief review of the scientific method as a way of thinking about the issues and problems in music, this text addresses the nature-nurture problem, identification and assessment of musical aptitude, musical development, adult skill maintenance, technical and expressive skills, practice, interpretation and expressivity, sight-reading, memorization, creativity, and composition, performance anxiety, critical listening, and teaching and learning. While there is a large body of empirical research regarding music, most musicians lack the scientific training to interpret these studies. This text bridges this gap by relating these skills to the musician's experiences, addressing their needs directly with non-technical language and practical application. The book includes multiple illustrations, brief music examples, cases, questions, and suggestions for further reading.

  • The Grove Book of Operas

    First published in 1996 to great critical and popular acclaim, the Grove Book of Operas, is a collection of synopses and descriptions of over 250 operas. Each succinct yet insightful entry is written by a leading authority on the opera and includes a full synopsis of the plot, a cast list, a note on the singers in the original production, and information on the origins of the work and its literary and social background. Contributions conclude with a brief comment on the particular work's place in operatic history. A glossary offers brief and accessible definitions of terms that may be unfamiliar to the reader. And indices of role names and of arias and ensembles allow the reader to find operas containing their favorite aria or a well-known character. The second edition brings the book up to date with several recently composed operas and a fascinating introductory essay by David Levin on opera performance in the 21st century. Recent additions to the operatic repertory included for the first time in this edition include Nicholas Maw, Sophie's Choice; Poul Ruders, A Handmaid's Tale; John Adams, Death of Klinghoffer; and Mark Adamo, Little Women. Covering all operas in the current repertory along with some less-well-known early and very modern ones, this is an ideal volume for the general opera lover.

  • The Taboo of Subjectivity: Towards a New Science of Consciousness

    This book takes a bold new look at ways of exploring the nature, origins, and potentials of consciousness within the context of science and religion. Alan Wallace draws careful distinctions between four elements of the scientific tradition: science itself, scientific realism, scientific materialism, and scientism. Arguing that the metaphysical doctrine of scientific materialism has taken on the role of ersatz-religion for its adherents, he traces its development from its Greek and Judeo-Christian origins, focusing on the interrelation between the Protestant Reformation and the Scientific Revolution. He looks at scientists' long term resistance to the firsthand study of consciousness and details the ways in which subjectivity has been deemed taboo within the scientific community. In conclusion, Wallace draws on William James's idea for a "science of religion" that would study the nature of religious and, in particular, contemplative experience. In exploring the nature of consciousness, this groundbreaking study will help to bridge the chasm between religious belief and scientific knowledge. It is essential reading for philosophers and historians of science, scholars of religion, and anyone interested in the relationship between science and religion.

  • Manufacturing Religion: The Discourse on Sui Generis Religion and the Politics of Nostalgia

    In this new book, author Russell McCutcheon offers a powerful critique of traditional scholarship on religion, focusing on multiple interrelated targets. Most prominent among these are the History of Religions as a discipline; Mircea Eliade, one of the founders of the modern discipline; recent scholarship on Eliade's life and politics; contemporary textbooks on world religions; and the oft-repeated bromide that "religion" is a sui generis phenomenon. McCutcheon skillfully analyzes the ideological basis for and service of the sui generis argument, demonstrating that it has been used to constitute the field's object of study in a form that is ahistoric, apolitical, fetishized, and sacrosanct. As such, he charges, it has helped to create departments, jobs, and publication outlets for those who are comfortable with such a suspect construction, while establishing a disciplinary ethos of astounding theoretical naivete and a body of scholarship to match. Surveying the textbooks available for introductory courses in comparative religion, the author finds that they uniformly adopt the sui generis line and all that comes with it. As a result, he argues, they are not just uncritical (which helps keep them popular among the audiences for which they are intended, but badly disserve), but actively inhibit the emergence of critical perspectives and capacities. And on the geo-political scale, he contends, the study of religion as an ahistorical category participates in a larger system of political domination and economic and cultural imperialism.

  • The Myth of Ownership: Taxes and Justice

    In a capitalist economy, taxes are the most important instrument by which the political system puts into practice a conception of economic and distributive justice. Taxes arouse strong passions, fueled not only by conflicts of economic self-interest, but by conflicting ideas of fairness. Taking as a guiding principle the conventional nature of private property, Murphy and Nagel show how taxes can only be evaluated as part of the overall system of property rights that they help to create. Justice or injustice in taxation, they argue, can only mean justice or injustice in the system of property rights and entitlements that result from a particular regime. Taking up ethical issues about individual liberty, interpersonal obligation, and both collective and personal responsibility, Murphy and Nagel force us to reconsider how our tax policy shapes our system of property rights.

  • Making Sense of Data: A Self-Instruction Manual on the Interpretation of Epidemiological Data

    This is a self-instructional manual on the interpretation and use of epidemiologic data that deals with the basic concepts and skills needed for appraising published reports or study findings. Applications in clinical medicine, public health, community medicine, and research are presented. The numerous changes in this edition include the addition of a section on questions to be asked before deciding to apply study results in practice, discussions of new topics (Cox proportional hazards regression, qualitative studies, ROC curves), and fresh examples.

  • Voodoo Science: The Road from Foolishness to Fraud

    In a time of dazzling scientific progress, how can we separate genuine breakthroughs from the noisy gaggle of false claims? From Deepak Chopra's "quantum alternative to growing old" to unwarranted hype surrounding the International Space Station, Robert Park leads us down the back alleys of fringe science, through the gleaming corridors of Washington power and even into our evolutionary past to search out the origins of voodoo science. Along the way, he offers simple and engaging science lessons, proving that you don't have to be a scientist to spot the fraudulent science that swirls around us.
    While remaining highly humorous, this hard-hitting account also tallies the cost: the billions spent on worthless therapies, the tax dollars squandered on government projects that are doomed to fail, the investors bilked by schemes that violate the most fundamental laws of nature. But the greatest cost is human: fear of imaginary dangers, reliance on magical cures, and above all, a mistaken view of how the world works.
    To expose the forces that sustain voodoo science, Park examines the role of the media, the courts, bureaucrats and politicians, as well as the scientific community. Scientists argue that the cure is to raise general scientific literacy. But what exactly should a scientifically literate society know? Park argues that the public does not need a specific knowledge of science so much as a scientific world view--an understanding that we live in an orderly universe governed by natural laws that cannot be circumvented.

  • Trial Consulting

    In its roughly 25 years of existence, the trial consulting profession has grown dramatically in membership, recognition , and breadth of practice. What began as a small activist group of social scientists volunteering their expertiseto assist in the defence of Vietnam War protestors has evolved into a diverse set of professionals from a range of educational and professional backgrounds. In spite of such enormous growth, the work of trial consultants has gone largely unexamined. Trial Consulting takes an in-depth look at the primary activities of trial consultants, including witness preparation, focus groups and mock trials, jury selection, change of venue surveys, and attorney presentation style. It also examines the profession's struggle to define itself, resisting certification and licensure requirements and settling instead for a set of practice standards. The authors draw upon empirical and other scholarly work in the social sciences, recommended "best practices" from trial lawyers, and the written and spoken recommendations and reflections of the trial consultants themselves. Addressing a broad spectrum of topics ranging from handwriting analysis to medical malpractice cases, they also suggest reforms for improving the profession and the efficacy of the trial consultant in the courtroom. The result is a critical analysis of what trial consulting truly adds to, and detracts from, the administration of justice. This book is an indispensible guide for practicing and aspiring trial consultants as well as the judges, attorneys, and psychologists who work with them. Trial Consulting provides a thought-provoking statement on the state of the profession, and students and professionals alike will benefit from the challenges it presents.

  • Beer: Tap into the Art and Science of Brewing

    Written by one of the world's leading authorities and hailed by American Brewer as "brilliant" and "by a wide margin the best reference now available," Beer offers an amusing and informative account of the art and science of brewing, examining the history of brewing and how the brewing process has evolved through the ages. The third edition features more information concerning the history of beer especially in the United States; British, Japanese, and Egyptian beer; beer in the context of health and nutrition; and the various styles of beer. Author Charles Bamforth has also added detailed sidebars on prohibition, Sierra Nevada, life as a maltster, hopgrowing in the Northwestern U.S., and how cans and bottle are made. Finally, the book includes new sections on beer in relation to food, contrasting attitudes towards beer in Europe and America, how beer is marketed, distributed, and retailed in the US, and modern ways of dealing with yeast.

  • Sleep Medicine: Essentials and Review

    Sleep Medicine is one of the fastest growing fields of medicine and of strong interest to neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, pulmonologists, otolaryngologists, and the technologists who perform sleep studies. In 2007, sleep medicine became an official medical subspecialty, with board examinations being administered by the American Board of Medical Specialties. This book provides a comprehensive, practical guide to managing sleep disorders, written by a major authority in the field. In addition, it includes 150 multiple choice questions with answers and explanations, to help those studying for American Board exams.

  • Ethical Argument: Critical Thinking in Ethics

    This short introduction to ethics bridges the gap between theory and practice. By combining case studies with discussion of theoretical issues, the text introduces students to the most important ethical concepts. The book is an ideal introductory volume for undergraduate students.

  • A Guide to Biblical Sites in Greece and Turkey

    Nearly two-thirds of the New Testament--including all of the letters of Paul, most of the book of Acts, and the book of Revelation--is set outside of Israel, in either Turkey or Greece. Although biblically-oriented tours of the areas that were once ancient Greece and Asia Minor have become increasingly popular, up until now there has been no definitive guidebook through these important sites. In A Guide to Biblical Sites in Greece and Turkey, two well-known, well-traveled, biblical scholars offer a fascinating historical and archaeological guide to these sites. The authors reveal countless new insights into the biblical text while reliably guiding the traveler through every significant location mentioned in the Bible. The book completely traces the journeys of the Apostle Paul across Turkey (ancient Asia Minor), Greece, and the islands of the Mediterranean. A description of the location and history of each site is given, followed by an intriguing discussion of its biblical significance. Clearly written and in non-technical language, the work links the latest in biblical research with recent archaeological findings. A visit to the site is described, complete with easy-to-follow walking directions, indicating the major items of archaeological interest. Detailed site maps, historical charts, and maps of the regions are integrated into the text, and a glossary of terms is provided. Easy to use and abundantly illustrated, this unique guide will help visitors to Greece and Turkey appreciate the rich history, significance, and great wonder of the ancient world of the Bible.

  • The New Executive Brain: Frontal Lobes in a Complex World

    Elkhonon Goldberg's groundbreaking The Executive Brain was a classic of scientific writing, revealing how the frontal lobes command the most human parts of the mind. Now he offers a completely new book, providing fresh, iconoclastic ideas about the relationship between the brain and the mind. In The New Executive Brain, Goldberg paints a sweeping panorama of cutting-edge thinking in cognitive neuroscience and neuropsychology, one that ranges far beyond the frontal lobes. Drawing on the latest discoveries, and developing complex scientific ideas and relating them to real life through many fascinating case studies and anecdotes, the author explores how the brain engages in complex decision-making; how it deals with novelty and ambiguity; and how it addresses moral choices. At every step, Goldberg challenges entrenched assumptions. For example, we know that the left hemisphere of the brain is the seat of language--but Goldberg argues that language may not be the central adaptation of the left hemisphere. Apes lack language, yet many also show evidence of asymmetric hemispheric development. Goldberg also finds that a complex interaction between the frontal lobes and the amygdale--between a recently evolved and a much older part of the brain--controls emotion, as conscious thoughts meet automatic impulses. The author illustrates this observation with a personal example: the difficulty he experienced when trying to pick up a baby alligator he knew to be harmless, as his amygdala battled his effort to extend his hand. In the years since the original Executive Brain, Goldberg has remained at the front of his field, constantly challenging orthodoxy. In this revised and expanded edition, he affirms his place as one of our most creative and insightful scientists, offering lucid writing and bold, paradigm-shifting ideas.

  • Principles of Finance with Excel

    Principles of Finance with Excel is the first finance text that comprehensively integrates Excel into the teaching and practice of finance. Finance is inherently a topic requiring lots of computation and in today's business world this computation is almost wholly carried out in Excel. Despite this, many books rely heavily on hand calculators, and business school students often find that when they leave the academic environment they have to relearn both finance and Excel. The Excel-based approach of Principles of Finance with Excel gives better tools to the instructor and the student and integrates the educational message with the most useful financial tool available. There are no financial calculator examples in Principles of Finance with Excel, just Excel. The resulting message is clear: The Practice of Finance goes hand-in-hand with Excel. As every Excel user knows, a spreadsheet is not just a "computational tool", a slightly more sophisticated twist on the calculator. Using a spreadsheet gives new and deeper insights into financial decision making. The ability to combine graphics with computation, the powerful functions incorporated into the spreadsheet, and the ease with which sensitivity analysis can be done-all these give potent insights into financial problems.

  • Measuring Medical Professionalism

    Patients who are confident of physicians' intellectual and technical abilities are sometimes not convinced of their professional behaviour. Systemic and anecdotal cases of physician misconduct, conflict of interest, and self-interest abound. Many have even come to mistrust physicians as patient advocates. How can patients trust the intellectual and technical aspects of medical care, but not the professional? In order to enhance and promote professionalism in medicine, one should expect it, encourage it, and evaluate it. By measuring their own professional behaviour, physicians can provide the kind of transparency with which they can regain the trust of patients and society. Not only patients, but also institutions which accredit organizations have demanded accountability of physicians in their professional behaviour. While there has been much lament and a few strong proposals for improving professionalism, no single reliable and valid measure of the success of these proposals exists. This book is a theory-to-practice text focused on ways to evaluate professional behaviour written by leaders in the field of medical education and assessment.

  • Minnie Fisher Cunningham: A Suffragist's Life in Politics

    The principal orchestrator of the passage of women's suffrage in Texas, a founder and national officer of the League of Women Voters, the first woman to run for a U.S. Senate seat from Texas, and a candidate for that state's governor, Minnie Fisher Cunningham was one of the first American women to pursue a career in party politics. Cunningham's professional life spanned a half century, thus illuminating our understanding of women in public life between the Progressive Era and the 1960s feminist movement. Cunningham entered politics through the suffrage movement and women's voluntary association work for health and sanitation in Galveston, Texas. She quickly became one of the most effective state suffrage leaders, helping to pass the bill in a region where opposition to women voters was strongest. In Washington, Cunningham was one of the core group of suffragists who lobbied the Nineteenth Amendment through Congress and then traveled the country campaigning for ratification. After women gained the right to vote across the nation, she helped found the nonpartisan National League of Women Voters and organized training schools to teach women the skills of grassroots organizing, creating publicity campaigns, and lobbying and monitoring legislative bodies. Through the League, she became acquainted with Eleanor Roosevelt, who credited one of her speeches with stimulating her own political activity. Cunningham then turned to the Democratic Party, serving as an officer of the Woman's National Democratic Club and the Women's Division of the Democratic National Committee. In 1928 Cunningham became a candidate herself, making an unsuccessful bid for the U.S. Senate. An advocate of New Deal reforms, Cunningham was part of the movement in the 1930s to transform the Democratic Party into the women's party, and in 1944 she ran for governor on a pro-New Deal platform. Cunningham's upbringing in rural Texas made her particularly aware of the political needs of farmers, women, union labor, and minorities, and she fought gender, class, and racial discrimination within a conservative power structure. In the postwar years, she was called the "very heart and soul of Texas liberalism" as she helped build an electoral coalition of women, minorities, and male reformers that could sustain liberal politics in the state and bring to office candidates including Ralph Yarborough and Bob Eckhardt. A leader and role model for the post-suffrage generation, Cunningham was not satisfied with simply achieving the vote, but agitated throughout her career to use it to better the lives of others. Her legacy has been carried on by the many women to whom she taught successful grassroots strategies for political organizing.

  • Truth: A Guide

    The author of the highly popular book Think, which Time magazine hailed as "the one book every smart person should read to understand, and even enjoy, the key questions of philosophy," Simon Blackburn is that rara avis--an eminent thinker who is able to explain philosophy to the general reader. Now Blackburn offers a tour de force exploration of what he calls "the most exciting and engaging issue in the whole of philosophy"--the age-old war over truth. The front lines of this war are well defined. On one side are those who believe in plain, unvarnished facts, rock-solid truths that can be found through reason and objectivity--that science leads to truth, for instance. Their opponents mock this idea. They see the dark forces of language, culture, power, gender, class, ideology and desire--all subverting our perceptions of the world, and clouding our judgement with false notions of absolute truth. Beginning with an early skirmish in the war--when Socrates confronted the sophists in ancient Athens--Blackburn offers a penetrating look at the longstanding battle these two groups have waged, examining the philosophical battles fought by Plato, Protagoras, William James, David Hume, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Richard Rorty, and many others, with a particularly fascinating look at Nietzsche. Among the questions Blackburn considers are: is science mere opinion, can historians understand another historical period, and indeed can one culture ever truly understand another. Blackburn concludes that both sides have merit, and that neither has exclusive ownership of truth. What is important is that, whichever side we embrace, we should know where we stand and what is to be said for our opponents.

  • American Law in a Global Context: The Basics

    American Law in a Global Context is an elegant and erudite introduction to the American legal system from a global persepctive. There is no basic book that introduces the foreign lawyer who has already studied the law of foreign jurisdictions to fundamental concepts of American law and legal practice. This book fills that void. Using a comparative approach, George P. Fletcher and Steve Sheppard introduce underlying principles of common and civil law, constitutional, criminal, and public law, and property and procedure. Designed to help the foreign student grasp the basic ideas of pedagogy, legal institutions and substantive law in the US, appendices include an introduction to the common law method, instruction on how to read a case, the interpretation of statutes, and an introduction to the Federal system and US courts systems. A must-own reference source for LLM students, undergraduates, and students of US law in other countries.

  • Mindware: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Cognitive Science

    Mindware is an introductory text with a difference. In eight short chapters it tells a story and invites the reader to join in some up-to-the-minute conceptual discussion of the key issues, problems, and opportunities in cognitive science. The story is about the search for a cognitive scientific understanding of mind. It is presented as a no-holds-barred journey from early work in Artificial Intelligence, through connectionist (artificial neural network) counter-visions, and onto neuroscience artificial life, dynamics and robotics. The journey ends with some wide-ranging and provacative speculation about the role of technology and the changing nature of the human mind itself. Each chapter is organized as an initial sketch of a research program or theme, followed by a substantial discussion section in which specific problems and issues (both familiear and cutting-edge) are raised and pursued. Discussion topics include mental causation, the hardware/software distinction, the relations between life and mind, the nature of perception, cognition and action, and the continuity (or otherwise) of high-level human intelligence with other forms of adaptive response. Classic topics are treated alongside the newer ones in an integrated treatment of the various discussions. The sketches and discussions are accompanied by numerous figures and boxed sections, and followed by suggestions for futher reading.

  • Mighty Fine Words and Smashing Expressions: Making Sense of Transatlantic English

    Americans and Britons are exposed to unedited texts, scripts, and speech from one another's dialects at an unprecedented and accelerating rate. Most people have no trouble understanding the general meaning of language in the other dialect, but readers and listeners very often fail to understand or misunderstand critical words, references, and allusions for lack of familiarity of the social and cultural contexts that underlie various usages. This book remedies this gap in understanding by cataloguing the differences that language users on either side of the Atlantic are likely to encounter in their dealings with the other dialect. By taking a culturally neutral stance it addresses the needs of both British and American readers and listeners. The thematic organization of the book allows the user to access language differences in various subject areas, where words likely to be needed at the same time can all be found together. Chapters include; Politics, Law, and Government; Business and Money; Medicine and Healthcare; Education; Food, Clothing, and Shelter; Transportation; Sports; and Profanity and Obscenity, in addition to basic information on orthography, weights and measures, etc. The appendices and extensive index provide a ready point of entry for quick look-ups, and there will be an extra chapter on Canadian, Australian, and Asian English.

  • Introduction to Game Theory: International Edition

    Game-theoretic reasoning pervades economic theory and is used widely in other social and behavioural sciences. An Introduction to Game Theory International Edition, by Martin J. Osborne, presents the main principles of game theory and shows how they can be used to understand economics, social, political, and biological phenomena. The book introduces in an accessible manner the main ideas behind the theory rather than their mathematical expression. All concepts are defined precisely, and logical reasoning is used throughout. The book requires an understanding of basic mathematics but assumes no specific knowledge of economics, political science, or other social or behavioural sciences. Coverage includes the fundamental concepts of strategic games, extensive games with perfect information, and coalitional games; the more advanced subjects of Bayesian games and extensive games with imperfect information; and the topics of repeated games, bargaining theory, evolutionary equilibrium, rationalizability, and maxminimization. The book offers a wide variety of illustrations from the social and behavioural sciences. Each topic features examples that highlight theoretical points and illustrations that demonstrate how the theory may be used.

  • Why Punish? How Much?: A Reader on Punishment

    Punishment is a complex human institution. It has normative, political, social, psychological, and legal dimensions, and ways of thinking about each of them change over time. For this reader on punishment, Michael Tonry, a leading authority in the field, has composed a comprehensive collection of 28 essays ranging from classic and contemporary writings on normative theories by philosophers and penal theorists to writings on restorative justice, on how people think about punishment, and on social theories about the functions punishment performs in human societies. This volume includes an accessible, non-technical introduction on the development of punishment theory, as well as an introduction and annotated bibliography for each section. The readings cover foundational traditions of punishment theory such as consequentialism, retributivism, and functionalism, new approaches like restorative, communitarian, and therapeutic justice, as well as mixed approaches that attempt to link theory and policy. It follows the evolution and development of thinking about punishment spanning from writings by classical theorists such as Kant and Hegel to recent developments in the behavioral and medical sciences for thinking about punishment. The result is a collection of empirically-informed efforts to explain what punishment does that should spark contemplation and debate about why and how punishment is carried out.

  • Adult Neurogenesis: Stem Cells and Neuronal Development in the Adult Brain

    This is the first comprehensive, integrated account of one of the most exciting areas of neuroscience - the intersection between the discoveries that the adult brain makes new neurons and that it contains stem cells. The book begins with the historical background and discusses theories of adult neurogenesis and neural stem cell biology in the context of learning and memory processes as well as structural plasticity. It describes in detail neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus and olfactory system and then surveys the regulatory, functional, and comparative aspects, concluding with a chapter on the provocative hypotheses that link failing adult neurogenesis with such diseases as temporal lobe epilepsy, major depression, brain tumours, and dementias. This readable, single-authored volume is a unique resource for graduate students, investigators, and clinicians in the neurosciences, developmental biology, and stem cell research.

  • The Expert Versus the Object:: Judging Fakes and False Attributions in the Visual Arts

    The authenticity of art has always commanded the attention of experts, dealers, collectors and the art-minded public - especially those who relish the Robin Hoods of art forgery who deceive rich collectors and pompous experts. This book os essays, edited by a lawyer specializing in art law and authenticity, proposes to make the question of authenticity more easily understood. The mainpoints to be argues are (1) that the pereption of form in a work of art is not like other types of evidence accepted in courts of law; (2) that in determining authenticity, experts must adopt a careful, organized approach; (3) that all authentication should be based on the consensus of experts at arm's length from an object.

  • The Trojan Women

    The Greek Tragedy in New Translations series is based on the conviction that only translators who write poetry themselves, or who work in collaboration with poets, can properly re-create the celebrated and timeless tragedies of the great Greek writers. These new translations are more than faithful to the original text, going beyond the literal meaning in order to evoke the poetic intensity and rich metaphorical texture of the Greek language. The Trojan Women describes with unparalleled intensity the horrific brutality that both women and children undergo at the end of the Trojan War, but in the end it is a play that insists on the victory of spirit amid the horrors created by gods and men. Poet and English professor Alan Shapiro, together with noted Greek scholar, translator, and Classics professor Peter Burian, bring into their own words the Aeschylean vision of a world fraught with spiritual and political tensions, disordered by an irrational war.

  • The Alcoholic Empire: Vodka & Politics in Late Imperial Russia

    The Alcoholic Empire examines the prevalence of alcohol in Russian social, economic, religious, and political life. Herlihy looks at how the state, the church, the military, doctors, lay societies, and the czar all tried to battle the problem of overconsumption of alcohol in the late imperial period. Since vodka produced essential government revenue and was a backbone of the state economy, many who fought for a sober Russia believed that the only way to save the country through Revolutionary change. This book traces temperance activity and politics side by side with the end of the tsarist regime, while showing how the problem of alcohoism continued to pervade Soviet and post-Soviet society. Illustrated by timeless and incisive sayings about the Russian love of vodka and by poster art and paintings, this book will appeal to Russian and European historians and those interested in temperance history.

  • Music in Bali: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture

    Music in Bali is a volume in the Global Music Series, edited by Bonnie Wade and Patricia Shehan Campbell. This volume, appropriate for use in undergraduate, introductory courses on world music or ethnomusicology, introduces the musical traditions of Bali. The text discusses the ensemble tradition of Balinese music, underscoring the communal nature of the social organization of Bali. By describing various performances - from a temple ceremony, to a shadow puppet performance, to a masked dance drama - Gold surveys the range of performance contexts from the highly sacred to the secular. Stressing the vitality and centrality of music in Bali, the text describes the interconnectedness of the layers of the Balinese musical tradition, illustrating the integration of music, dance, theater and ritual in Balinese society. Drawing on over 25 years of study of Balinese music and shadow-puppetry, author Lisa Gold presents contemporary Balinese performance within its cultural and historical context, linking Bali's rich past to its present role in a modern, globilized society. Through a careful examination of musical traditions and guided listening, Gold illustrates how new compositions borrow or reuse material from earlier traditions while also allowing for individual expression and innovation in a vibrant contemporary culture.

  • The Oxford Handbook of Engineering and Technology in the Classical World

    Nearly every aspect of daily life in the Mediterranean world and Europe during the florescence of the Greek and Roman cultures is relevant to the topics of engineering and technology. This volume highlights both the accomplishments of the ancient societies and the remaining research problems, and stimulates further progress in the history of ancient technology. The subject matter of the book is the technological framework of the Greek and Roman cultures from ca. 800 B.C. through ca. A.D. 500 in the circum-Mediterranean world and Northern Europe. Each chapter discusses a technology or family of technologies from an analytical rather than descriptive point of view, providing a critical summation of our present knowledge of the Greek and Roman accomplishments in the technology concerned and the evolution of their technical capabilities over the chronological period. Each presentation reviews the issues and recent contributions, and defines the capacities and accomplishments of the technology in the context of the society that used it, the available "technological shelf," and the resources consumed. These studies introduce and synthesize the results of excavation or specialized studies. The chapters are organized in sections progressing from sources (written and representational) to primary (e.g., mining, metallurgy, agriculture) and secondary (e.g., woodworking, glass production, food preparation, textile production and leather-working) production, to technologies of social organization and interaction (e.g., roads, bridges, ships, harbors, warfare and fortification), and finally to studies of general social issues (e.g., writing, timekeeping, measurement, scientific instruments, attitudes toward technology and innovation) and the relevance of ethnographic methods to the study of classical technology. The unrivalled breadth and depth of this volume make it the definitive reference work for students and academics across the spectrum of classical studies.

  • The New Public Finance: Responding to Global Challenges

    The world's agenda of international cooperation has changed. The conventional concerns of foreign affairs, international trade, and development assistance, are increasingly sharing the political center stage with a new set of issues. These include trans-border concerns such as global financial stability and market efficiency, risk of global climate change, bio-diversity conservation, control of resurgent and new communicable diseases, food safety, cyber crime and e-commerce, control of drug trafficking, and international terrorism and weapons of mass destruction. Globalization and increasing porosity of national borders have been key driving forces that have led to growing interdependence and interlocking of the public domains--and therefore, public policy concerns--of countries, governments, private businesses, civil society, and people at large. Thus, new and different issues are now occupying top places on national policy agendas, and consequently, on the agendas of international negotiating forums. The policy approaches to global challenges are also changing. A proliferation and diversification of international cooperation efforts include focus on financing arrangements. Financing of international cooperation in most instances is a haphazard and non-transparent process and often seems to run parallel to international negotiations. There are many unfunded mandates and many-non-mandatory funds. To agree on and to achieve international economic goals, we need to understand how financing of international cooperation efforts actually works. Our understanding is hampered by two gaps: 1) lack of an integrated and cohesive theoretical framework; 2) lack of consolidated empirical and operational knowledge in the form of a comprehensive inventory of past, current and possible future (i.e. currently deliberated) financing mechanisms. This book reduces these two gaps and provides a guide to improve our ability to finance international cooperation.

  • Athenaze: Book I

    Combining the best features of traditional and modern methods, Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, 2/e, provides a unique course of instruction that allows students to read connected Greek narrative right from the beginning and guides them to the point where they can begin reading complete classical texts. Carefully designed to hold students' interest, the course begins in Book I with a fictional narrative about an Attic farmer's family placed in a precise historical context (432-431 B.C.). This narrative, interwoven with tales from mythology and the Persian Wars, gradually gives way in Book II to adapted passages from Thucydides, Plato, and Herodotus and ultimately to excerpts of the original Greek of Bacchylides, Thucydides, and Aristophanes' Acharnians. Essays on relevant aspects of ancient Greek culture and history are also provided. New to the Second Edition: * Short passages from Classical and New Testament Greek in virtually every chapter * The opening lines of the Iliad and the Odyssey toward the end of Book II * New vocabulary and more complete explanations of grammar, including material on accents * Many new exercises and additional opportunities for students to practice completing charts of verb forms and paradigms of nouns and adjectives * Updated Teacher's Handbooks for Books I and II containing translations of all stories, readings, and exercises; detailed suggestions for classroom presentation; abundant English derivatives; and additional linguistic information * Offered for the first time, Student Workbooks for Books I and II that include self-correcting exercises, cumulative vocabulary lists, periodic grammatical reviews, and additional readings

  • Epilepsy in Our Words: Personal Accounts of Living with Seizures

    Epilepsy in our Words features 68 personal accounts of seizure activity from people with epilepsy that illustrate the wide range of experiences associated with seizures and living with epilepsy. Many have had epilepsy for years, and their accounts are heartfelt and realistic. An introductory section explains epilepsy and different seizure types from a medical perspective. An index helps readers focus on particular symptoms and other specific aspects of seizures, such as seizure warnings and triggers. ABOUT THE SERIES: With the Brainstorms series, one of the world's leading authorities on epilepsy, Dr Steven C. Schachter, has gathered together the personal testimonies of patients, family members, and caregivers to create a poignant and gripping series of books on this misunderstood and often devastating disorder.

  • Gorlin's Syndromes of the Head and Neck

    This classic text covers over 700 different genetic syndromes involving the head and neck, and has established itself as the definitive, comprehensive work on the subject. The discussion covers the phenotype spectrum, epidemiology, mode of inheritance, pathogenesis, and clinical profile of each condition, all of which is accompanied by a wealth of illustrations. The authors are recognized leaders in the field, and their vast knowledge and strong clinical judgment will help readers make sense of this complex and burgeoning field. As in all fields of genetics, there has been an explosion in the genetics of dysmorphology syndromes, and the authors have completely updated all chapters in light of the discoveries of the Human Genome Project and other ongoing advances. New syndromes have been added and information on existing syndromes has been revised.

  • Internet Politics: States, Citizens, and New Communication Technologies

    In the developed world, there is no longer an issue of whether the Internet affects politics--but how, why and with what consequences. With the Internet now spreading at a breathtaking rate in the developing world, the new medium is fraught with tensions, paradoxes, and contradictions. How do we make sense of these? In this major new work, Andrew Chadwick addresses such concerns, providing the first comprehensive overview of Internet politics. Internet Politics examines the impact of new communication technologies on political parties and elections, pressure groups, social movements, local democracy, public bureaucracies, and global governance. It also analyzes persistent and controversial policy problems, including the digital divide; the governance of the Internet itself; the tensions between surveillance, privacy and security; and the political economy of the Internet media sector. The approach is explicitly comparative, providing numerous examples from the U.S., Britain, and many other countries. Written in a clear and accessible style, this theoretically sophisticated and up-to-date text reveals the key difference the Internet makes in how we "do" politics and how we "think about" political life. Featuring numerous figures, tables, and text boxes, Internet Politics is ideal for undergraduate and graduate courses in political science, international relations, and communication studies.

  • When Church Became Theatre: The Transformation of Evangelical Architecture and Worship in Nineteenth-Century America

    For nearly eighteen centuries, two fundamental spatial plans dominated Christian architecture: the basilica and the central plan. In the 1880s, however, profound socio-economic and technological changes in the United States contributed to the rejection of these traditions and the development of a radically new worship building, the auditorium church. When Church Became Theatre focuses on this radical shift in evangelical Protestant architecture and links it to changes in worship style and religious mission. The auditorium style, featuring a prominent stage from which rows of pews radiated up a sloping floor, was derived directly from the theatre, an unusual source for religious architecture but one with a similar goal-to gather large groups within range of a speaker's voice. Theatrical elements were prominent; many featured proscenium arches, marquee lighting, theatre seats, and even opera boxes. Examining these churches and the discussions surrounding their development, Jeanne Halgren Kilde focuses on how these buildings helped congregations negotiate supernatural, social, and personal power. These worship spaces underscored performative and entertainment aspects of the service and in so doing transformed relationships between clergy and audiences. In auditorium churches, the congregants' personal and social power derived as much from consumerism as from piety, and clerical power lay in dramatic expertise rather than connections to social institutions. By erecting these buildings, argues Kilde, middle class religious audiences demonstrated the move toward a consumer-oriented model of religious participation that gave them unprecedented influence over the worship experience and church mission.

  • The Rules of War: The Geneva Conventions in the Age of Terror

    With the scandal over prison abuse at Abu Ghraib and the legal controversy over the enemy combatants at Guantanamo Bay, the proper treatment of prisoners of war has once again been thrust into the news. At the heart of this debate stands the Geneva Conventions, a famous set of rules about which most of us know nothing. In The Rules of War, Derek Jinks - a leading authority on humanitarian law - provides an illuminating account of the Geneva Conventions, revealing when they apply, who they protect, what type of treatment they require, how they should be enforced, and much more. We learn that the Conventions - which were drafted in 1949 - apply to all armed conflict, from declared war, to civil war, to armed hostilities short of war. In fact, the Conventions are relevant to a remarkable range of issues, from the trial of Slobodan Milosevic to the ongoing criminal proceedings regarding Rwanda and Sierra Leone. We discover that the Conventions protect a wide range of combatants, from "special ops" forces, to private military contractors, and even to terrorists. There are POW Conventions, but also Civilian Conventions that protects all nationals who have fallen into the hands of the enemy, including "unlawful combatants" such as the Guantanamo detainees. And we see what the Conventions require, from humane treatment, to contact with agencies such as the Red Cross, to release and repatriation at the end of the conflict. This is the only guide for general readers to the Geneva Conventions, rules which will play a key role in hot-button issues from the imminent trial of Saddam Hussein to the treatment of captured terrorists.

  • A History of U.S.: From Colonies to Country

    Recommended by the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy as an exemplary informational text.

    How did compliant colonials with strong ties to Europe get the notion to become an independent nation? Perhaps the seeds of liberty were planted in the 1735 historic courtroom battle for the freedom of the press. Or maybe the French and Indian War did it, when colonists were called "Americans" for the first time by the English, and the great English army proved itself not so formidable after all. But for sure when King George III started levying some heavy handed taxes on the colonies, the break from the motherland was imminent. With such enthralling characters as George Washington, Sam Adams, Patrick Henry, Eliza Pinckney, and Alexander Hamilton throughout, From Colonies to Country is an amazing story of a nation making transformation.

    About the Series:
    Master storyteller Joy Hakim has excited millions of young minds with the great drama of American history in her award-winning series A History of US. Recommended by the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy as an exemplary informational text, A History of US weaves together exciting stories that bring American history to life. Hailed by reviewers, historians, educators, and parents for its exciting, thought-provoking narrative, the books have been recognized as a break-through tool in teaching history and critical reading skills to young people. In ten books that span from Prehistory to the 21st century, young people will never think of American history as boring again.

  • Individual Bankruptcy and Restructuring

    This legal almanac discusses the law of bankruptcy as it relates to the individual. It explains the various documents which must be filed, the automatic stay protection, the exemptions available to the debtor, the difference between dischargeable and non-dischargeable debts, the bankruptcy chapters under which an individual debtor generally files his or her case, and the role of the trustee during the process. The Legal Almanac Series consists of over 75 handy guides for the lay person on all aspects of the law. Each volume includes an overview of the topic followed by chapters on the major issues in that subject. Each volume contains an Appendix containing several primary source documents as well as practical forms and checklists. A Glossary defines any technical terms used in the text.

  • The Birds of Northern Melanesia: Speciation, Dispersal, and Biogeography

    Ernst Mayr is one of the principal architects of the 'neo-Darwinian synthesis', which has been the dominant perspective in 20th century evolutionary biology. Jared Diamond is one of the most wide-ranging minds in biology, and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for "Guns, Germs, and Steel". Mayr and Diamond decided in 1970 to collaborate on an authoritative monograph presenting their data and interpretations of the evolution of the birds of the Solomon and Bismark Islands. Mayr's numerous expeditions to do fieldwork in this area, beginning in 1929 and continuing through 1976, form the core of his scientific work. Diamond has made four expeditions to the region since 1970 to fill in gaps in the data.

  • Six Days of War: June 1967 and the Making of the Modern Middle East

    In 1967 the future of the state of Israel was far from certain. But with its swift and stunning military victory against an Arab coalition led by Egypt in the Six Day War, Israel not only preserved its existence but redrew the map of the region, with fateful consequences. The Camp David Accords, the assassinations of Anwar Sadat and Yitzhak Rabin, the intifada, and the current troubled peace negotiations--all of these trace their origins to the Six Day War. Michael Oren's Six Days of War is a gripping account of one of the most dramatic and important episodes in the history of the Middle East. With exhaustive research in primary sources--including Soviet, Jordanian, and Syrian files not previously available--he has reconstructed the tension-filled background and the dramatic military events of the conflict, drawing the threads together in a riveting narrative, enlivened by crisp characters sketches of major characters (many of whom, from Ariel Sharon to Yasser Arafat, are still leading figures today). Most important, Oren has unearthed some dramatic new findings. He has discovered that a top-secret Egyptian plan to invade Israel and wipe out its army and nuclear reactor came within hours of implementation. He also reveals how the superpowers narrowly avoided a nuclear showdown over the Eastern Mediterranean and how a military coup in Israel almost occurred on the eve of the war.

  • Handbook of Electrogastrography

    The Handbook of Electrogastrography is the first textbook dedicated to reviewing the physiology of gastric myelectrical activity and the measurement of this electrical activity with electrodes placed on the abdominal surface - the electrogastrogram. The Handbook is divided into three major sections. The first section focuses on the history of electrogastrography, electrical activity of the interstitial cells of Cajal, the cells from which gastric electrical rhythmicity emanates. The cellular level of gastric electrical rhythmicity provides an understanding of the physiological basis of the electrogastrogram signal. The second section of the book incorporates the practical aspects of recording a high quality electrogastrogram and approaches to the analysis of the electrogastrogram using visual inspection and computer techniques. This section focuses on the authors' combined experience of examining EGG recordings for more than sixty years. From this rich research and clinical experience, the clinical application of EGG recordings in an approach to patients with unexplained nausea and vomiting is described. Neuromuscular disorders of the stomach involving gastric dysrhythmias are reviewed. The third section of the book comprises many examples of gastric dysrythmias ranging from bradygastrias to tachygastrias and mixed dysrythmias. Current understanding of the mechanisms of gastric dysrhythmias is reviewed. Artifacts in the EGG signal, which may be confused with gastric dysrhythmias, are also presented. The Handbook of Electrogastrography will be a valuable reference for physicians interested in recording gastric electrical activity in clinical practices or in clinical research. Gastroenterologists, internists, psychologists and others with an interest in gastric myoelectrical events will also find extensive and relevant information for recording and interpreting EGGs in the Handbook.

  • The Oxford Book of Military Anecdotes

    If anecdotes are marginal notes on the pages of history, these will delight any reader who has ever been moved or entertained by the condition of the soldier. Few fields of human endeavor have inspired so many memorable anecdotes as warfare, from the Bible and Livy through Gibbon and Froissart, to the imperial wars of the nineteenth century and the world conflicts of the twentieth. This collection of is principally concerned with American and British conflicts, with, as the author says, "occasional forays among the ranks of foreign armies"--notably the Greeks, the Romans, and Napoleon's veterans. Hastings has sought stories that illustrate the military condition through the ages, both on the battlefield and in barracks: comic, eccentric, heroic, tragic. Here are Caesar at the Rubicon and the revolt of the Praetorian Guard; Alexander's horse and Prince Rupert's dog; the legendary Mother Ross enlisting in search of her lost husband in 1693; Evelyn Waugh as the least plausible of commandos; General Douglas MacArthur's good luck charm "Charlie," a lump of lava rock carved into a Hawaiian warrior; and much more. Some of the stories will be familiar to students of military history while others are less well known, but all provide fascinating sidelights to history. "An outstanding book...in a class by itself. It's a work of literature. One can't simply browse: The quality of the writing casts the spell of poetry. Although historical, the stories take on the universality of art."--Christian Science Monitor "Hastings is...aware of a good story. [He] succeeds in illustrating the soldiers' experience in both unusual and specific aspects."--Library Journal BL"[A] fascinating collection of military stories...the sort of book that can be picked up at intervals...[but] once tasted, is hard to put down."--Washington Post Book World Great war stories by Max Hastings, a leading military historian and war correspondent About the Author: Max Hastings is a well-known author specializing in military history. His most recent books include Bomber Command, Battle for the Falklands, and Overlord.

  • Reforming Pensions: Principles and Policy Choices

    Mandatory pensions are a worldwide phenomenon. However, with fixed contribution rates, monthly benefits, and retirement ages, pension systems are not consistent with three long-run trends: declining mortality, declining fertility, and earlier retirement. Many systems need reform. This book gives an extensive nontechnical explanation of the economics of pension design. The theoretical arguments have three elements: * Pension systems have multiple objectives--consumption smoothing, insurance, poverty relief, and redistribution. Good policy needs to bear them all in mind. * Good analysis should be framed in a second-best context-- simple economic models are a bad guide to policy design in a world with imperfect information and decision-making, incomplete markets and taxation. * Any choice of pension system has risk-sharing and distributional consequences, which the book recognizes explicitly. Barr and Diamond's analysis includes labor markets, capital markets, risk sharing, and gender and family, with comparison of PAYG and funded systems, recognizing that the suitable level of funding differs by country. Alongside the economic principles of good design, policy must also take account of a country's capacity to implement the system. Thus the theoretical analysis is complemented by discussion of implementation, and of experiences, both good and bad, in many countries, with particular attention to Chile and China.

  • Bad Boys, Bad Men: Confronting Antisocial Personality Disorder

    Whether called black sheep, sociopaths, felons, conmen, or misfits, some men break all the rules. They shirk everyday responsibilities, abuse drugs and alcohol, take up criminal careers, and lash out at family members. In the worst cases, they commit rape, murder, and other acts of extreme violence as though they lack a conscience. What makes these men - men we all know, whether as faces from crime reports or as people close to us - behave the way they do? Bad Boys, Bad Men examines the mysterious mental condition that underlies this lifelong penchant for bad behaviour. Psychiatrist and researcher Donald W. Black, M.D., draws on case studies, scientific data, and current events to explore antisocial behaviour and to chart the history, nature, and treatment of a misunderstood disorder that effects up to seven million Americans. Black shows that the condition psychiatrists call antisocial personality disorder, or ASP, is not a myth but a very real problem that causes more pain to individuals and society than many commonly recognized psychiatric illnesses. New evidence from genetics and neuroscience supports the long-held notion that extreme cases of antisocial behaviour are tied to biologic causes and that some people are simply born bad. Bad Boys, Bad Men summarizes recent advances in genetics, brain imaging and psychophysiologic research that shed light on ASP. The disorder's impact spans every society and is linked to a host of social problems, including crime, domestic violence, drug abuse, and neglected children. Black argues that any attempt to counter these problems requires confronting ASP and that some of today's high-profile crimincal cases may be rooted in this perplexing disorder. In Bad Boys, Bad Men Black describes the warning signs that predict which troubled children are more likely to become dangerous adults. The books details the slow progress towards treatment for ASP, discusses the role of the criminal justice system in dealing with the disorder, and offers advice for individuals and families affected by it. Drawing on the author's research into the progression of ASP, Bad Boys, Bad Men introduces people like Ernie, the quintessential juvenile delinquent who had an incestuous relationship with his mother and descended into crime and alcoholism; Ed, the charming con man whoe wealthy parents tried to bail him out at every turn; Paul, an exhibitionist who sex offenses were only the beginning of his problems; and John Wayne Gacy, the notorious serial killer whose lifelong pattern of misbehaviour escalated to the rape and murder of more than 30 young men and boys. These compelling cases read like medical detective stories, as Black tries to separate the lies these men tell from the facts of their lives. For people with ASP, life becomes an opportunity to grab what they can without remorse or concern for the consequences of their actions. In depicting the antisocial personality, Bad Boys, Bad Men underscores the fundamental human need for conscience and social order. Though Bad Boys, Bad Men is written for general audience, its summary of the psychiatric literature makes it suitable for readers already familiar with the topic. It will be of interest to psychiatrists, psychologists, criminologists, social workers, victims of crime and domestic abuse, and anyone else interested in understanding social behaviour.

  • Geology and Health: Closing the Gap

    Geology and Health is an integration of papers from geo-bio-chemical scientists on health issues of concern to humankind worldwide, demonstrating how the health and well-being of populations now and in the future can benefit through coordinated scientific efforts. International examples on dusts, coal, arsenic, fluorine, lead, mercury, and water borne chemicals, that lead to health effects are documented and explored. They were selected to illustrate how hazards and potential hazards may be from natural materials and processes and how anthropomorphic changes may have contributed to disease and debilitation instead of solutions. Introductory essays by the editors highlight some of the progress toward scientific integration that could be applied to other geographic sites and research efforts. A global purview and integration of earth and health sciences expertise could benefit the future of populations from many countries. Effective solutions to combat present and future hazards will arise when the full scope of human interactions with the total environment is appreciated by the wide range of people in positions to make important and probably expensive decisions. A case to illustrate the point of necessary crossover between Geology and Health was the drilling of shallow tube wells in Bangladesh to provide non-contaminated ground water. This "good" solution unfortunately mobilized arsenic from rocks into the aquifer and created an unforeseen or 'silent' hazard: arsenic. Geologists produce maps of earth materials and are concerned with natural processes in the environment with long time-frame horizons. The health effects encountered through changing the water source might have been avoided if the hydrological characteristics of the Bangladesh delta had been known and any chemical hazards had been investigated and documented. A recurrence of this type of oversight should be avoidable when responsible parties, often government officials, appreciate the necessity of such integrated efforts. The book extols the virtues of cooperation between the earth, life and health sciences, as the most practical approach to better public health worldwide.

  • Cortex and Mind: Unifying Cognition

    This book presents a unique synthesis of the current neuroscience of cognition by one of the world's authorities in the field. The guiding principle to this synthesis is the tenet that the entirety of our knowledge is encoded by relations, and thus by connections, in neuronal networks of our cerebral cortex. Cognitive networks develop by experience on a base of widely dispersed modular cell assemblies representing elementary sensations and movements. As they develop cognitive networks organize themselves hierarchically by order of complexity or abstraction of their content. Because networks intersect profusely, sharing commong nodes, a neuronal assembly anywhere in the cortex can be part of many networks, and therefore many items of knowledge. All cognitive functions consist of neural transactions within and between cognitive networks. After reviewing the neurobiology and architecture of cortical networks (also named cognits), the author undertakes a systematic study of cortical dynamics in each of the major cognitive functions--perception, memory, attention, language, and intelligence. In this study, he makes use of a large body of evidence from a variety of methodologies, in the brain of the human as well as the nonhuman primate. The outcome of his interdisciplinary endeavor is the emergence of a structural and dynamic order in the cerebral cortex that, though still sketchy and fragmentary, mirrors with remarkable fidelity the order in the human mind.

  • The United Nations: A Very Short Introduction

    The United Nations has been called everything from "the best hope of mankind" to "irrelevant" and "obsolete." With this much-needed introduction to the UN, Jussi Hanhimaki engages the current debate over the organizations effectiveness as he provides a clear understanding of how it was originally conceived, how it has come to its present form, and how it must confront new challenges in a rapidly changing world. After a brief history of the United Nations and its predecessor, the League of Nations, the author examines the UN's successes and failures as a guardian of international peace and security, as a promoter of human rights, as a protector of international law, and as an engineer of socio-economic development. Hanhimaki stresses that the UN's greatest problem has been the impossibly wide gap between its ambitions and capabilities. In the area of international security, for instance, the UN has to settle conflicts--be they between or within states--without offending the national sovereignty of its member states, and without being sidelined by strong countries, as happened in the 2003 intervention of Iraq. Hanhimaki also provides a clear accounting of the UN and its various arms and organizations (such as UNESCO and UNICEF), and he offers a critical overview of how effective it has been in the recent crises in Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia, for example--and how likely it is to meet its overall goals in the future. The United Nations, Hanhimaki concludes, is an indispensable organization that has made the world a better place. But it is also a deeply flawed institution, in need of constant reform. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

  • Fossils, Finches, and Fuegians: Darwin's Adventures and Discoveries on the Beagle

    When Charles Darwin, then age 22, first saw the HMS Beagle, he thought it looked "more like a wreck than a vessel commissioned to go round the world." But travel around the world it did, taking Darwin to South America, Australia, New Zealand, Tahiti, and of course the Galapagos Islands, in a journey of discovery that lasted almost five years. Now, in Fossils, Finches and Fuegians, Richard Keynes, Darwin's great grandson, offers the first modern full-length account of Darwin's epoch-making expedition. This was the great adventure of Charles Darwin's life. Indeed, it would have been a great adventure for anyone--tracking condor in Chile, surviving the great earthquake of 1835, riding across country on horseback in the company of gauchos, watching whales leaping skyward off Tierra del Fuego, hunting ostriches with a bolo, discovering prehistoric fossils and previously unknown species, and meeting primitive peoples such as the Fuegians. Keynes captures many of the natural wonders that Darwin witnessed, including an incredible swarm of butterflies a mile wide and ten miles long. Keynes also illuminates Darwin's scientific work--his important findings in geology and biology--and traces the slow revolution in Darwin's thought about species and how they might evolve. Numerous illustrations--mostly by artists who traveled with Darwin on the Beagle--grace the pages, including finely rendered drawings of many points of interest discussed in the book. There has probably been no greater or more important scientific expedition than Darwin's voyage on the Beagle. Packed with colorful details of life aboard ship and in the wild, here is a fascinating portrait of Charles Darwin and of 19th century science.

  • Shifting Sands: The Rise and Fall of Biblical Archaeology

    Before the 1970s, biblical archaeology was the dominant research paradigm for those excavating the history of Palestine. Today most people prefer to speak of Syro/Palestinian archaeology. This is not just a normal shift but reflects a major theoretical and methodological change. It has even been labelled a revolution. In the popular mind, however, biblical archaeology is still alive and well. In Shifting Sands, Thomas W. Davis charts the evolution and the demise of the discipline. Biblical archaeology, he writes, was an attempt to ground the historical witness of the Bible in demonstrable historical reality.

  • America's Uncivil Wars: The Sixties Era from Elvis to the Fall of Richard Nixon

    In contrast with most histories of this period, America's Uncivil Wars: The Sixties Era from Elvis to the Fall of Richard Nixon does not treat the 1960s as a single historical moment or as successive waves of activism. Rather, it employs a chronological narrative to identify three distinct phases during which events of the era unfolded. The first began with the cultural ferment of the 1950s and ended with the assassination of John F. Kennedy. During the second phase, from 1964-1968, the "uncivil" wars began in earnest: Americans disagreed about new social and cultural mores, protests against the Vietnam War increased in size and vehemence, and American cities erupted in racial violence. From 1967 through 1968, all of these forces combined to divide Americans more deeply than they had been since the Civil War. In the third phase, Richard Nixon promised to bring Americans together. However, a host of new value and identity movements--environmentalists, consumer advocates, feminists, gay, Latino, and Native American activists--frustrated his design. Only after the Watergate scandals forced this polarizing figure from office did a measure of civility return to the nation's public discourse. America's Uncivil Wars captures the broad sweep of this tumultuous era, analyzing both the cultural and political influences on the movements of the 1960s. Paying particular attention to Latinos, Native Americans, feminism, and gay liberation, it integrates the politics of gender and race into the central political narrative. The book also covers such topics as McCarthyism; the FBI; rock and roll; teen culture in the 1950s; the origins of SDS, SNCC, and YAF; and the environmental and consumer movements. With its engaging narrative style and broad cultural emphasis, America's Uncivil Wars brings a fresh approach to our understanding of not only the 1960s but also U.S. history since 1945.

  • Swimming Lessons: Keeping Afloat in the Age of Technology

    David Ehrenfeld is a highly esteemed writer on ecology and conservation biology. The founding editor of The Journal of Conservation Biology and author of The Arrogance of Humanism and Beginning Again, his new book is an elegant study of the cost to human dignity and potential, of the shrinking wilderness and the ongoing degredation of the environment. He ruminates on the impacts of short-sighted governmental and economic policies, and of new technologies on human values and communities, tracing the human impacts upon the urban, agricultural and wilderness environments. Ehrenfeld has a unique, unmistakable voice as a major spokesperson for the conservation ethic and the human values implicit in environmentalism and conservation biology. This book should appeal strongly to readers of Ehrenfeld's earlier books and essays, and reach and satisfy a broad constituency on the green end of the political spectrum.

  • Criminal Justice and Moral Issues

    This text addresses the following two questions: "What kinds of problems can the law solve?" and "What kinds of problems does the law create?" Using these questions as starting points, Meier and Geis evenhandedly explore the role and function of law relating to six major issues that often divide Americans today: prostitution, drug use, homosexuality, abortion, pornography, and gambling. Statutes and public opinion have shifted dramatically over recent decades in regard to these behaviors. The book details these developments and offers explanations of why they have occurred. Some people view all or some of these behaviors as acts that ought to be permitted, as part of individual freedom. Others find one, some, or all of them to be genuine threats to the country's social and moral fiber and believe that they ought to be criminalized. Still others maintain that action ought to be taken to limit some of the behaviors, but that using the criminal justice system is not the best way to proceed. Meier and Geis' provocative book offers sophisticated, in-depth discussions of these issues, then reviews the conflicting opinions about the proper role of criminal law in dealing with them. It is written in straightforward, jargon-free language, providing an ideal background for exploring the facts and views regarding what are often contentious concerns. Criminal Justice and Moral Issues increases student understanding through the abundant use of relevant illustrations, examples, and case studies.

  • The Oxford Study Bible: Revised English Bible with Apocrypha

    This volume combines a cultural guide to the biblical world and an annotated Bible. Its notes feature the reflections of Protestant, Roman Catholic, and Jewish scholars. * Twenty-three insightful articles on aspects of the history, literary background, and culture of the biblical era. * A special index of people, places, and themes of the Bible. * 36 pages of full-color New Oxford Bible Maps, with index.

  • Bone Dysplasias: An Atlas of Genetic Disorders of Skeletal Development

    Many advances have been made in understanding skeletal dysplasias since the first edition of this classic text appeared in 1974. The diagnostic process has been refined, many new disorders have been recognized, and the molecular aspects in many cases have been elucidated. The second edition has been completely updated, with the help of two new co-authors, to incorporate these advances. The book's format is similar to the original but the number of conditions covered has almost doubled and molecular information has been added wherever available. The number of figures has been increased to the limit of economic wisdom. As in the first edition, the illustrations have been selected and sequenced to illustrate both the degree of variability of a given disorder and its changes with age. This book is designed for physicians involved in the evaluation and treatment of patients with skeletal dysplasias, including radiologists, medical geneticists, paediatricians, and orthopaedic surgeons. Its main goal is to assist in the diagnosis of specific conditions and the care of affected individuals. Though mutations of specific genes can produce dysplasias with very different phenotypes and prognoses, the primarily clinical aim of this book dictated a phenotypic classification in general, with compromises on etiologic grounds where necessary. Since the attempt to diagnose a skeletal dysplasia from single signs, alone or in combination, is fraught with errors, the authors focus on basic patterns of skeletal abnormalities.

  • Brave New Brain: Conquering Mental Illness in the Era of the Genome

    Brave New Brain is a travel guide to the future. Scientists are presently mapping both the terrain of the brain and the geography of the genome. Psychiatry has joined them on a quest to conquer mental illnesses - those illnesses that strike the most human part of our bodies, our brains and minds. Brave New Brain is designed as a resource book for following this voyage of discovery. It explains the nature of mental illness and genome and brain mapping. using clear simple language, interesting case histories, and extensive illustrations. Scientists today know more about the brain than ever before. Andreasen gives us an engaging and readable description of how it all works, from the billions of neurons to the tiny thalamus to the moral monitor in our prefrontal cortex. She also shows the progress made in mapping the human genome, whose 30,000-40,000 genes are almost all active in the brain.

  • Drummin' Men: The Swing Years

    In the 1930s swing music was everywhere--on radio, recordings, and in the great ballrooms, hotels, theatres, and clubs. Perhaps at no other time were drummers more central to the sound and spirit of jazz. Benny Goodman showcased Gene Krupa. Jimmy Dorsey featured Ray McKinley. Artie Shaw helped make Buddy Rich a star while Count Basie riffed with the innovative Jo Jones. Drummers were at the core of this music; as Jo Jones said, "The drummer is the key--the heartbeat of jazz." An oral history told by the drummers, other musicians, and industry figures, Drummin' Men is also Burt Korall's memoir of more than fifty years in jazz. Personal and moving, the book is a celebration of the music of the time and the men who made it. Meet Chick Webb, small, fragile-looking, a hunchback from childhood, whose explosive drumming style thrilled and amazed; Gene Krupa, the great showman and pacemaker; Ray McKinley, whose rhythmic charm, light touch, and musical approach provided a great example for countless others, and the many more that populate this story. Based on interviews with a collection of the most important jazzmen, Drummin' Men offers an inside view of the swing years that cannot be found anywhere else.

  • Overcoming Secondary Stress in Medical and Nursing Practice: A Guide to Professional Resilience and Personal Well-Being

    Physicians, nurses, and allied health professionals working in today's health care settings must be prepared to offer support in dangerous times despite staffing shortages, financial pressures, and complex legal requirements. Overcoming Stress in Medical and Nursing Practice: A Guide to Professional Resilience and Personal Well-Being is a concise guide for all medical professionals who face these demands. This book: * Provides critical information about the dangers of compassion fatigue/burnout and vicarious post-traumatic stress disorder in health care settings . Introduces a newly-developed "Medical-Nursing Professional Secondary Stress Self-Awareness Questionnaire" that can be profitably self-administered at each phase of one's career and reflected upon in private, with one's mentor, or in a small group setting * Includes a unique section on strengthening one's inner life through the use of three core spiritual wisdom approaches drawn from a world religion perspective * Provides a description of four types of "voices" one needs to have in one's circle of friends to ensure that balance, perspective, growth, and challenge are fostered in one's personal and professional life * Describes how physicians, nurses, and allied health professionals can formulate a personally-designed self-care protocol for themselves Lastly, this book offers an extensive and up-to date bibliography of recent research, clinical papers, and books on medical-nursing practice and secondary stress. Overcoming Stress in Medical and Nursing Practice is an indispensable resource for medical and nursing professionals, students, and the counselors and therapists who work with them.

  • Managing Chronic Pain: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Approach, Workbook

    Chronic pain has a multitude of causes, many of which are not well understood or effectively treated by medical therapies. Individuals with chronic pain often report that pain interferes with their ability to engage in occupational, social, or recreational activities. Sufferers' inability to engage in these everyday activities may contribute to increased isolation, negative mood and physical deconditioning, which in turn can exacerbate their experience of pain. Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) has been proven effective at managing various chronic pain conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, chronic back pain, and tension/migraine headache. The CBT treatment engages patients in an active coping process aimed at changing maladaptive thoughts and behaviours that can serve to maintain and exacerbate the experience of chronic pain. Designed to be used in conjunction with formal therapy, this Workbook presents tools to help patients manage their chronic pain and regain control of their lives.

  • Cathedrals of Science: The Personalities and Rivalries That Made Modern Chemistry

    In Cathedrals of Science, Patrick Coffey describes how chemistry got its modern footing-how thirteen brilliant men and one woman struggled with the laws of the universe and with each other. They wanted to discover how the world worked, but they also wanted credit for making those discoveries, and their personalities often affected how that credit was assigned. Gilbert Lewis, for example, could be reclusive and resentful, and his enmity with Walther Nernst may have cost him the Nobel Prize; Irving Langmuir, gregarious and charming, "rediscovered" Lewis's theory of the chemical bond and received much of the credit for it. Langmuir's personality smoothed his path to the Nobel Prize over Lewis. Coffey deals with moral and societal issues as well. These same scientists were the first to be seen by their countries as military assets. Fritz Haber, dubbed the "father of chemical warfare," pioneered the use of poison gas in World War I-vividly described-and Glenn Seaborg and Harold Urey were leaders in World War II's Manhattan Project; Urey and Linus Pauling worked for nuclear disarmament after the war. Science was not always fair, and many were excluded. The Nazis pushed Jewish scientists like Haber from their posts in the 1930s. Anti-Semitism was also a force in American chemistry, and few women were allowed in; Pauling, for example, used his influence to cut off the funding and block the publications of his rival, Dorothy Wrinch. Cathedrals of Science paints a colorful portrait of the building of modern chemistry from the late 19th to the mid-20th century.

  • Ancient Laws and Contemporary Controversies: The Need for Inclusive Interpretation

    Many Christians ignore most Old Testament laws as obsolete or irrelevant. Others claim to honor them but in fact pick and choose among them very selectively in support of specific agendas, like opposition to homosexual rights. Yet it is a basic tenet of Christian doctrine that the faith is contained in both the Old and the New Testament. If the law is ignored, an important aspect of the faith tradition is denied. In this book Cheryl Anderson tackles this problem head on, attempting to answer the question whether the laws of the Old Testament are authoritative for Christians today. This question is crucial, because some Christians actually believe that the New Testament abolishes the law, or that the major Protestant reformers (Luther, Calvin, Wesley) rejected the law. Anderson acknowledges the deeply problematic nature of some Old Testament law, especially as it applies to women. For example, Exodus 22:16-17 and Deuteronomy 22:28-29 both deem the rape of an unmarried female to have injured her father rather than the female herself. Deuteronomy requires the victim to marry her rapist. Anderson argues that biblical laws nevertheless teach us foundational values. They also, however, remind us of the differences between their ancient context and our own. She suggests that we approach biblical law in much the same way that Americans regard the Constitution. The nation's founding fathers were privileged white males who did not have the poor, women, or people of color in mind when they agreed that "all men are created equal." The Constitution has subsequently been amended and court decisions have extended its protections to those who were previously excluded. Although the biblical documents cannot be modified, the manner in which they are interpreted in later settings can and should be altered. In addition to her work as a scholar of the Old Testament, Anderson has been a practicing attorney, and has worked extensively in critical, legal, feminist and womanist theory. This background uniquely qualifies her to apply insights from contemporary law and legal theory to the interpretive history of biblical law, and to draw out their implications for issues of gender, class, and ethnicity.

  • Freedom from Fear: The American People in Depression and War 1929-1945

    Between 1929 and 1945, two great travails were visited upon the American people: the Great Depression and World War II. Freedom from Fear tells the story of how Americans endured, and eventually prevailed, in the face of those unprecedented calamities. The Depression was both a disaster and an opportunity. As David Kennedy vividly demonstrates, the economic crisis of the 1930s was far more than a simple reaction to the alleged excesses of the 1920s. For more than a century before 1929, America's unbridled industrial revolution had gyrated through repeated boom and bust cycles, wastefullly consuming capital and inflicting untold misery on city and countryside alike. Nor was the fabled prosperity of the 1920s as uniformly shared ag legend portrays. Countless Americans, especially if they were farmers, African Americans, or recent immigrants, eked out thread bare lives on the margins of national life. For them the Depression was but another of the ordeals of fear and insecurity with which they were sadly familiar. Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal wrung from the trauma of the 1930s a lasting legacy of economic and social reform, in cluding the Social Security Act, new banking and financial laws, regulatory legistlation, and new opportunities for organized labour. Taken together, those reforms gave a measure of security to millons of Americans who had never had much of it, and with a fresh sense of having a stake in their country. Freedom from Fear tells the story of the New Deal's achievments, without slighting its shortcomings, contraditions and failures. It is a story rinch in drama and peopled with unforgettable personalities, including the incandescent but enigmatic figure of Roosevelt himself. Even as the New Deal was coping with the Depression, a still more fearsome menace was developing abroad--Hitler's thirst for war in Europe, coupled with the imperial ambitions of Japan in Asia. The same generation of Americans who battled the Depression evenutally had to shoulder the arms in another conflict that wreaked world wide destruction, ushered in the nuclear age and forever changed their own way of life and their country's relationship to the rest of the world. Freedom from Fear explains how the nation agonized over its role in World War II, how it fought the war, why the United States won, and why the consequences of victory were sometimes sweet, sometimes ironic. In a compelling narrative, Kenney analyses the determinants of American strategy, the painful choices faced by commanders and statesmen, and the agonies inflicted on the millions of ordinary Americans who were compelled to swallow their fears and face battle as best they could. Freedom from Fear is a comprehensive and colourful account of the most convulsive period in American history, excepting only the Civil War - a period that formed the crucible in which modern America was formed.

  • The Nazi Connection: Eugenics, American Racism, and German National Socialism

    When Hitler published Mein Kampf in 1924, he held up a foreign law as a model for his program of racial purification: The U.S. Immigration Restriction Act of 1924, which prohibited the immigration of those with hereditary illnesses and entire ethnic groups. When the Nazis took power in 1933, they installed a program of eugenics--the attempted "improvement" of the population through forced sterilization and marriage controls--that consciously drew on the U.S. example. By then, many American states had long had compulsory sterilization laws for "defectives," upheld by the Supreme Court in 1927. Small wonder that the Nazi laws led one eugenics activist in Virginia to complain, "The Germans are beating us at our own game." In The Nazi Connection, Stefan Kuhl uncovers the ties between the American eugenics movement and the Nazi program of racial hygiene, showing that many American scientists actively supported Hitler's policies. After introducing us to the recently resurgent problem of scientific racism, Kuhl carefully recounts the history of the eugenics movement, both in the United States and internationally, demonstrating how widely the idea of sterilization as a genetic control had become accepted by the early twentieth century. From the first, the American eugenicists led the way with radical ideas. Their influence led to sterilization laws in dozens of states--laws which were studied, and praised, by the German racial hygienists. With the rise of Hitler, the Germans enacted compulsory sterilization laws partly based on the U.S. experience, and American eugenists took pride in their influence on Nazi policies. Kuhl recreates astonishing scenes of American eugenicists travelling to Germany to study the new laws, publishing scholarly articles lionizing the Nazi eugenics program, and proudly comparing personal notes from Hitler thanking them for their books. Even after the outbreak of war, he writes, the American eugenicists frowned upon Hitler's totalitarian government, but not his sterilization laws. So deep was the failure to recognize the connection between eugenics and Hitler's genocidal policies, that a prominent liberal Jewish eugenicist who had been forced to flee Germany found it fit to grumble that the Nazis "took over our entire plan of eugenic measures." By 1945, when the murderous nature of the Nazi government was made perfectly clear, the American eugenicists sought to downplay the close connections between themselves and the German program. Some of them, in fact, had sought to distance themselves from Hitler even before the war. But Stefan Kuhl's deeply documented book provides a devastating indictment of the influence--and aid--provided by American scientists for the most comprehensive attempt to enforce racial purity in world history.

  • Polio: An American Story

    All who lived in the early 1950s remember the fear of polio and the elation felt when a successful vaccine was found. Now David Oshinsky tells the gripping story of the polio terror and of the intense effort to find a cure, from the March of Dimes to the discovery of the Salk and Sabin vaccines--and beyond. Here is a remarkable portrait of America in the early 1950s, using the widespread panic over polio to shed light on our national obsessions and fears. Drawing on newly available papers of Jonas Salk, Albert Sabin and other key players, Oshinsky paints a suspenseful portrait of the race for the cure, weaving a dramatic tale centered on the furious rivalry between Salk and Sabin. Indeed, the competition was marked by a deep-seated ill will among the researchers that remained with them until their deaths. The author also tells the story of Isabel Morgan, perhaps the most talented of all polio researchers, who might have beaten Salk to the prize if she had not retired to raise a family. As backdrop to this feverish research, Oshinsky offers an insightful look at the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, which was founded in the 1930s by FDR and Basil O'Connor. The National Foundation revolutionized fundraising and the perception of disease in America, using "poster children" and the famous March of Dimes to raise hundreds of millions of dollars from a vast army of contributors (instead of a few well-heeled benefactors), creating the largest research and rehabilitation network in the history of medicine. The polio experience also revolutionized the way in which the government licensed and tested new drugs before allowing them on the market, and the way in which the legal system dealt with manufacturers' liability for unsafe products. Finally, and perhaps most tellingly, Oshinsky reveals that polio was never the raging epidemic portrayed by the media, but in truth a relatively uncommon disease. But in baby-booming America--increasingly suburban, family-oriented, and hygiene-obsessed--the spectre of polio, like the spectre of the atomic bomb, soon became a cloud of terror over daily life.

  • Handbook to Life in the Aztec World

    Since its violent dissolution in 1521, the Aztec Empire of Mexico has continually intrigued us. Recent discoveries resulting from the excavation of the Templo Mayor in the heart of Mexico City have taught us even more about this fascinating culture. The increasing recognition that the achievements of Mesoamerican civilizations were among the most sophisticated of the ancient world has led to a demand for introductions to the basic methods and theories of scholars working throughout the region. Handbook to Life in the Aztec World gathers the results from recent archaeological discoveries and scholarly research into a single accessible volume. Organized thematically, the handbook covers all aspects of life in the Aztec world: Mesoamerican civilizations and Aztec archeology; evolution of Aztec civilization; geography of the Aztec world; society and government; religion, cosmology, and mythology; funerary beliefs and customs; Aztec art; Aztec architecture; Nahuatl literature; the calendar, astronomy, and mathematics; economy, industry, and trade; daily life; the Aztec after conquest and today. Each chapter includes an extensive bibliography, and more than 165 original line drawings, photographs, and maps complement the text. Handbook to Life in the Aztec World provides all the essential information required by anyone interested in Aztec history or culture.

  • Five Architects: Eisenman, Graves, Gwathmey, Hejduk, Meiser

    Five Architects, originally published in 1975, grew out of a meeting of the CASE group (Conference of Architects for the Study of the Environment) held at the Museum of Modern Art in 1969. The purpose of this gathering was to exhibit and criticize the work of five architects--Eisenman, Graves, Gwathmey, Hejduk, and Meier--who constituted a New York school, and who are now among the most influential architects working today. The buildings shown here have more diversity than one might expect from a school, but share certain properties of form, scale, and treatment of material. Collectively, their work makes a modest claim: it is only architecture, not the salvation of man and the redemption of the earth. No matter how varied their individual theories and visions, all five architects simply share a passion for the art of architecture. Providing complete drawings and photographic documentation, this collection also includes a comparative critique by Kenneth Frampton, an Introduction by Colin Rowe that suggests a still broader context for the work as a whole, and two short texts in which individual positions are outlined. Now back in print, Five Architects serves as a reference to the early work of some of America's most important architects and provides us with a glimpse back at the direction of architecture as they saw it twenty years ago.

  • Assessment of Malingered Neuropsychological Deficits

    Written specifically for the clinical neuropsychologist who does forensic consultations, the book is a comprehensive review by experts of the procedures available to evaluate malingered neuropsychological deficits. It discusses tools for detecting atypical patterns of performance on standard clinical tests as well as malingering on measures of perception and sensorimotor function, of attention, processing speed, and memory, and of executive function. The underpinnings of the forensic neuropsychology enterprise are presented in chapters on definitions of malingering, research designs for its evaluation, data on the frequency with which malingering occurs, diagnostic classification statistics, symptom validity tests that do not depend on forced choice testing, and those that do. Guidance on assessing exaggerated psychiatric symptoms; exaggerated medical symptoms and injuries; and detecting malingering during the neurological exam is also included. Of particular note is a chapter devoted to the topic of coaching. The book closes with a review of the diagnostic criteria for malingering and looks to the future with evidence-based proposals for improving the criteria.

  • Reconstructing the Dreamland: The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921. Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation

    The 1921 Tulsa Race Riot was the country's bloodiest civil disturbance of the century. Leaving perhaps 150 dead, 30 city blocks burned to the ground, and more than a thousand families homeless, the riot represented an unprecedented breakdown of the rule of law. It reduced the prosperous black community of Greenwood, Oklahoma, to rubble. In Reconstructing the Dreamland, Alfred Brophy draws on his own extensive research into contemporary accounts and court documents to chronicle this devastating riot, showing how and why the rule of law quickly eroded. Brophy offers a gut-wrenching portrait of mob violence and racism run amok, both on the night of the riot and the morning after, when a coordinated sunrise attack, accompanied by airplanes, stormed through Greenwood, torching and looting the community. Equally important, he shows how the city government and police not only permitted the looting, shootings, and burning of Greenwood, but actively participated in it. The police department, fearing that Greenwood was erupting into a "negro uprising" (which Brophy shows was not the case), deputized white citizens haphazardly, gave out guns and badges with little background check, or sent men to hardware stores to arm themselves. Likewise, the Tulsa-based units of the National Guard acted unconstitutionally, arresting every black resident they could find, leaving Greenwood property vulnerable to the white mob, special deputies, and police that followed behind and burned it. Brophy's revelations and stark narrative of the events of 1921 bring to life an incidence of racial violence that until recently lay mostly forgotten. Reconstructing the Dreamland concludes with a discussion of reparations for victims of the riot. That case has implications for other reparations movements, including reparations for slavery.

  • Shadows in the Field: New Perspectives for Fieldwork in Ethnomusicology

    Ethnomusicological fieldwork has significantly changed since the end of the the 20th century. Ethnomusicology is in a critical moment that requires new perspecitves on fieldwork - perspectives that are not addressed in the standard guides to ethnomusicological or anthropological method. The focus in ethnomusicological writing and teaching has traditionally centered around analyses and ethnographic representations of musical cultures, rather than on the personal world of understanding, experience, knowing, and doing fieldwork. Shadows in the Field deliberately shift the focus of ethnomusicology and of ethnography in general from representation (text) to experience (fieldwork). The "new fieldwork" moves beyond mere data collection and has become a defining characteristic of ethnomusicology that engages the scholar in meaningful human contexts. In this new edition of Shadows in the Field, renowned ethnomusicologists explore the roles they themselves act out while performing fieldwork and pose significant questions for the field: What are the new directions in ethnomusicological fieldwork? Where does fieldwork of "the past" fit into these theories? And above all, what do we see when we acknowledge the shadows we cast in the field? The second edition of Shadows in the Field includes updates of all existing chapters, a new preface by Bruno Nettl, and seven new chapters addressing critical issues and concerns that have become increasingly relevant since the first edition.

  • Bloody Constraint: War and Chivalry in Shakespeare

    War is a major theme in Shakespeare's plays. Aside from its dramatic appeal, it provided him with a context in which his characters, steeped in the ideals of chivalry, could discuss such concepts as honor, courage, patriotism, and justice. Well aware of the decline of chivalry in his own era, Shakespeare gave his characters lines calling for civilized behavior, mercy, humanitarian principles, and moral responsibility. In this remarkable new book, eminent legal scholar Theodor Meron looks at contemporary international humanitarian law and rules for the conduct of war through the lens of Shakespeare's plays and discerns chivalry's influence there. The book comes as a response to the question of whether the world has lost anything by having a system of law based on the Hague and Geneva conventions. Meron contends that, despite the foolishness and vanity of its most extreme manifestations, chivalry served as a customary law that restrained and humanized the conflicts of the generally chaotic and brutal Middle Ages. It had the advantage of resting on the sense that rules arise naturally out of societies, their armed forces, and their rulers on the basis of experience. Against a background of Medieval and Renaissance sources as well as Shakespeare's historical and dramatic settings, Meron considers the ways in which law, morality, conscience, and state necessity are deployed in Shakespeare's plays to promote a society in which soldiers behave humanely and leaders are held to high standards of civilized behavior. Thus he illustrates the literary genealogy of such modern international humanitarian concerns as the treatment of prisoners and of noncombatants and accountability for war crimes, showing that the chivalric legacy has not been lost entirely. Fresh and insightful, Bloody Constraint will interest scholars of international law, lovers of Shakespeare, and anyone interested in the history of war.

  • Organometallic Chemistry

    Designed with the needs of both undergraduate and graduate students in mind, Organometallic Chemistry, Second Edition, covers the fundamentals of organometallic chemistry by presenting seminal experiments, analyzing real data, and offering the most comprehensive problem sets available. The text opens with careful and patient explanations of the structure and bonding of organometallic compounds, providing a uniquely accessible introduction to the subject for undergraduate students. Later chapters build on this foundation with in-depth coverage of organometallic reaction mechanisms, more advanced topics of catalysis, carbene complexes, metathesis, applications of organometallic chemistry to organic synthesis, and cluster compounds. FEATURES * Numerous in-chapter worked examples and expansive end-of-chapter problem sets. Covering a wide spectrum of difficulty, the end-of-chapter problems range from basic practice problems to more advanced analytical ones; many of these are directly referenced to the current chemical literature. * An experimental approach--illustrated by both groundbreaking classic experiments and cutting-edge contemporary ones-- that not only teaches students what is now known about organometallic chemistry, but also how we know what we know * Real-world applications--highlighted throughout the text-- that engage students and reveal the relevance of organometallic chemistry to the world of industry NEW TO THE SECOND EDITION * Updated and expanded coverage of the latest developments in the field, including IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy; catalysis; carbene complexes; metathesis and polymerization; and applications to organic synthesis * More extensive treatments of industrial applications, including hydroformylation, uses of Grubbs and Schrock metal carbene catalysts, SHOP, palladium-catalyzed cross-couplings, and more * 50% more in-chapter worked examples and expansive end-of-chapter problem sets than the previous edition * 25% more in-chapter exercises (with answers in Appendix B) than the previous edition * A new focus on green chemistry that reveals how well its principles mesh with those of organotransition metal catalysis * Introduction of the 18-electron rule (Chapter 3) * New computational approaches to molecular orbital calculations (Chapter 2) * 25% more molecular model illustrations than the previous edition. The text now includes more than 600 illustrations and structures, including 120 brand-new figures; all preexisting figures have been revised for clarity and consistency. Organometallic Chemistry, Second Edition, is supplemented by an Instructor's Resource CD-ROM, which includes all of the figures from the text in electronic format and the solutions to all of the exercises and problems from the text (in an editable Word file format).

  • Music in South India: The Karnatak Concert Tradition and Beyond. Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture.

    This vivid introduction to the music of South India discusses historical and contemporary performance, cultural history and geography, and the social organization of performance traditions. It focuses primarily on Karnatak concert music and its formal conventions, modes of performance, and cultural influence within the context of the religious, historical, and political landscape of South India.

  • Geomodeling (Applied Geostatistics)

    Geomodeling applies mathematical methods to the unified modeling of the topology, geometry, and physical properties of geological objects. The methodology (gOcad, computer assisted design of geological data) is general, but in this book the author presents a new interpolation method for modeling natural objects that allows application of a wide range of complex data. The audience for the book will be graduate students and practitioners in the earth and environmental sciences.

  • Student Study Guide to An Age of Voyages, 1450-1600

    The Student Study Guides are important and unique components that are available for each of the six books in The Medieval & Early Modern World series. Each of the Student Study Guides is designed to be used with the student book at school or sent home for homework assignments. The activities in the Student Study guide will help students get the most out of their history books. Each student study guide includes a chapter-by-chapter two-page lesson that uses a variety of interesting activities to help a student master history and develop important reading and study skills.

  • Philosophy of Mathematics: Structure and Ontology

    Do numbers, sets, and so forth, exist? What do mathematical statements mean? Are they literally true or false, or do they lack truth values altogether? Addressing questions that have attracted lively debate in recent years, Stewart Shapiro contends that standard realist and antirealist accounts of mathematics are both problematic. As Benacerraf first noted, we are confronted with the following powerful dilemma. The desired continuity between mathematical and, say, scientific language suggests realism, but realism in this context suggests seemingly intractable epistemic problems. As a way out of this dilemma, Shapiro articulates a structuralist approach. On this view, the subject matter of arithmetic, for example, is not a fixed domain of numbers independent of each other, but rather is the natural number structure, the pattern common to any system of objects that has an initial object and successor relation satisfying the induction principle. Using this framework, realism in mathematics can be preserved without troublesome epistemic consequences. Shapiro concludes by showing how a structuralist approach can be applied to wider philosophical questions such as the nature of an "object" and the Quinean nature of ontological commitment. Clear, compelling, and tautly argued, Shapiro's work, noteworthy both in its attempt to develop a full-length structuralist approach to mathematics and to trace its emergence in the history of mathematics, will be of deep interest to both philosophers and mathematicians.

  • The Hair-Pulling Problem: A Complete Guide to Trichotillomania

    Trichotillomania, one of the family of obsessive-compulsive disorders, may afflict as many as 6 to 8 million people in the United States. Now, a leading authority on obsessive-compulsive disorders, Dr. Fred Penzel, has written the most up-to-date, comprehensive, and authoritative guide to this syndrome available, filled with reassuring advice for patients and their families.
    Endorsed by the Trichotillomania Learning Center, the leading advocate group for this disorder, this superb handbook includes all the information a patient or relative would need to understand this illness and to cope with it. Penzel provides a detailed discussion of causes and he reviews all the treatment options, describing the most effective medications and their side effects as well as the recommended cognitive and behavioral treatments. He shows patients how to design a self-help program and gain control of their compulsive behavior, how to prevent relapse, describes trichotillomania and its treatment in children, and suggests coping strategies for families at home and in public situations. He also provides a guide to all the resources available, including internet sites, recommended books, and videos, and outlines ways to start a support group. The appendix will include questionnaires, clinical rating scales, and the official DSM diagnostic criteria for the disorder, so readers can decide if they need to seek behavioral and possibly medical treatment.
    Dr. Penzel has helped patients with OCD and trichotillomania for over twenty years and is one of America's leading authorities on these disorders. Drawing on decades of hands-on experience, he has produced the most complete and scientifically accurate handbook available on this disorder, a comforting guide packed with information to help people with trichotillomania get well and stay well.

  • Metaphor: A Practical Introduction

    This clear and lucid primer fills an important need by providing a comprehensive account of the many new developments in the study of metaphor over the last twenty years and their impact on our understanding of language, culture, and the mind. Beginning with Lakoff and Johnson's seminal work in Metaphors We Live By, Kovecses outlines the development of "the cognitive linguistic theory of metaphor" by explaining key ideas on metaphor. He also explores primary metaphor, metaphor systems, the "invariance principle," mental-imagery experiments, the many-space blending theory, and the role of image schemas in metaphorical thought. He examines the applicability of these ideas to numerous related fields.

  • Healthy, Wealthy, and Fair: Health Care and the Good Society

    America may be one of the wealthiest countries in the world, but its citizens rank near the bottom in health status. Americans have lower life expectancy, more infant mortalities and higher adolescent death rates than most other advanced industrial nations--and even some developing countries. Though Americans are famous for tolerating great inequality in wealth, the gross inequities in the health system are less well recognized. In Healthy, Wealthy and Fair, a distinguished group of health policy experts chart the stark disparities in health and wealth in the United States. The authors explain how the inequities arise, why they persist, and what makes them worse. Growing income inequality, high poverty rates, and inadequate health care coverage: all three trends help account for the U.S.'s health troubles. The corrosive effects of market ideology and government stalemate, the contributors argue, have also proved a powerful obstacle to effective and more egalitarian solutions. A clarion call for a populist uprising to end the stalemate over health reform, Healthy, Wealthy, and Fair outlines concrete policy proposals for reform--tapping bold new ideas as well as incremental changes to existing programs. This important work will be indispensable to all those who care about our people's health, inequality, and American democracy.

  • Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart: A Casebook

    Chinua Achebe is Africa's most prominent writer, and Things Fall Apart (1958) is the most renowned and widely-read African novel in the global literary canon. Translated into close to sixty languages, Things Fall Apart is the novel that inaugurated the long and continuing tradition of postcolonial inquiry into the problematic relations between the West and the countries of the Third World that were once European colonies. This collection explores the artistic, multicultural, and global significance of Things Fall Apart from a variety of critical perspectives. The essays selected for this casebook represent the most important and well-established critical work written on the novel to date. This volume also contains an editor's introduction, an interview with Chinua Achebe, and suggestions for further reading.

  • Nadine Gordimer's Burger's Daughter: A Casebook

    Burger's Daughter, the seventh novel of South African writer Nadine Gordimer, focuses upon the daughter of a white, communist Afrikaner hero, thus encapsulating the warring conditioning forces in South Africa of race, sex, and class position. Based partly on fact, successively banned and unbanned by the South African authorities, the novel has also become something of a test case for feminist critics of Gordimer's writing. This casebook includes an interview with and an essay by Nadine Gordimer, classic and recent critical essays, an introduction discussing biographical and historical contexts and the literary reception, and a bibliography. reception, and a bibliography.

  • Epidemiologic Methods: Studying the Occurrence of Illness

    This is a rigorous, systematic introduction to the basic concepts and practical tools of epidemiologic research. Besides offering clear descriptions of key concepts, the book is rich with examples illustrating how these concepts are applied. Some examples are drawn from classic studies in the field, while many others concern modern-day epidemiologic studies of problems of current public health importance. Almost every chapter includes a set of exercises (with answers) to help students gain practice in applying new ideas and techniques. The book's chapters are organized around three main themes: general concepts and methods of epidemiology; major study designs; and evaluating policies and programs. Both authors are experienced epidemiologic researchers and have won multiple awards for effective teaching.

  • Trading and Exchanges: Market Microstructure for Practitioners

    This book is about trading, the people who trade securities and contracts, the marketplaces where they trade, and the rules that govern it. Readers will learn about investors, brokers, dealers, arbitrageurs, retail traders, day traders, rogue traders, and gamblers; exchanges, boards of trade, dealer networks, ECNs (electronic communications networks), crossing markets, and pink sheets. Also covered in this text are single price auctions, open outcry auctions, and brokered markets limit orders, market orders, and stop orders. Finally, the author covers the areas of program trades, block trades, and short trades, price priority, time precedence, public order precedence, and display precedence, insider trading, scalping, and bluffing, and investing, speculating, and gambling.

  • The World's Richest Indian: The Scandal over Jackson Barnett's Oil Fortune

    The first biography of Jackson Barnett, who gained unexpected wealth from oil found on his property. This book explores how control of his fortune was violently contested by his guardian, the state of Oklahoma, the Baptist Church, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and an adventuress who kidnapped and married him. Coming into national prominence as a case of Bureau of Indian Affairs mismanagement of Indian property, the litigation over Barnett's wealth lasted two decades and stimulated Congress to make long-overdue reforms in its policies towards Indians. Highlighting the paradoxical role played by the federal government as both purported protector and pilferer of Indian money, and replete with many of the major agents in twentieth-century Native American history, this remarkable story is not only captivating in its own right but highly symbolic of America's diseased and corrupt national Indian policy.

  • Voices of the Poor: Can Anyone Hear Us?

    First in a group of three volumes resulting from a global consultation and research effort. multi-country research initiative to understand poverty from the eyes of the poor, the 'Voices of the Poor' project was undertaken to inform the World Bank's activities and the 'World Development Report 2000/2001'. 'Voices of the Poor' marks the first time such an exercise has been undertaken in so many developing countries and transition economies around the world. -- Volume 1, 'Can Anyone Hear Us?' gathers the voices of over 40,000 poor women and men in 50 countries from the World Bank's participatory poverty assessments (Deepa Narayan, Raj Patel, Kai Schafft, Anne Rademacher, and Sarah Koch-Schulte, authors). -- Volume 2, 'Crying Out for Change' pulls together new field work conducted in 1999 in 23 countries (Deepa Narayan, Robert Chambers, Meera Shah, and Patti Petesch, authors). -- Volume 3, 'From Many Lands' offers regional patterns and country case-studies (Deepa Narayan and Patti Petesch, editors). 'Voices of the Poor' provides a unique and detailed picture of the life of the poor and explains the constraints poor people face to escape from poverty in a way that more traditional survey techniques do not capture well. Each of the three volumes demonstrates the importance of voice and power in poor people's definition of poverty. 'Voices of the Poor' concludes that we need to expand our conventional views of poverty which focus on income expenditure, education, and health to include measures of voice and empowerment. A copublication of the World Bank and Oxford University Press.

  • Signals and Systems

    System and Signal Analysis, 3/e bridges the gap between simple linear circuit analysis and the study of larger, more complex systems. It introduces fundamental concepts, system analysis, signal analysis, stabilities and their implications, and state-variable equations while integrating MATLAB(R) problems and examples throughout.

  • Fundamentals of Space Systems

    Fundamentals of Space Systems was developed to satisfy two objectives: the first is to provide a text suitable for use in an advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate course in both space systems engineering and space system design. The second is to be a primer and reference book for space professionals wishing to broaden their capabilities to develop, manage the development, or operate space systems. The authors of the individual chapters are practicing engineers that have had extensive experience in developing sophisticated experimental and operational spacecraft systems in addition to having experience teaching the subject material. The text presents the fundamentals of all the subsystems of a spacecraft missions and includes illustrative examples drawn from actual experience to enhance the learning experience. It included a chapter on each of the relevant major disciplines and subsystems including space systems engineering, space environment, astrodynamics, propulsion and flight mechanics, attitude determination and control, power systems, thermal control, configuration management and structures, communications, command and telemetry, data processing, embedded flight software, survuvability and reliability, integration and test, mission operations, and the initial conceptual design of a typical small spacecraft mission.

  • In Pursuit of Equity: Women, Men, and the Quest for Economic Citizenship in 20th-Century America

    In this volume, Alice Kessler-Harris explores the transformation of some of the United States' most significant social policies. Tracing changing ideals of fairness from the 1920s to the 1970s, she shows how a deeply embedded set of beliefs, or "gendered imagination" shaped seemingly neutral social legislation to limit the freedom and equality of women. Law and custom generally sought to protect women from exploitation, and sometimes from employment itself; but at the same time, they assigned the most important benefits to wage work. Most policy makers (even female ones) assumed from the beginning that women would not be breadwinners. Kessler-Harris shows how ideas about what was fair for men as well as women influenced old age and unemployment insurance, fair labor standards, Federal income tax policy, and the new discussion of women's rights that emerged after World War II. Only in the 1960s and 1970s did the gendered imagination begin to alter--yet the process is far from complete.

  • The Cute and the Cool: Wondrous Innocence and Modern American Children's Culture

    The cute child -- spunky, yet dependent, naughty but nice -- is largely a 20th-century invention. In this book, Gary Cross examines how that look emerged in American popular culture and how the cute turned into the cool, seemingly its opposite, in stories and games. Cross shows how adults have created the ideal of the innocent childhood and have used this to project adult needs and frustrations rather than concerns about protecting and nurturing the young -- and how the images, goods, and rituals of childhood have been co-opted by the commercial world. Magazine and TV ads, articles from the popular press, comic strips, movies, radio scripts, childrearing manuals, and government publications support this argument and the book is illustrated with cartoons, toys, ads, and photos.

  • Analytical Studies in World Music: Analytical Studies in World Music

    Analytical Studies in World Music assembles eleven distinguished writers on music to discuss the detail and ingenuity with which sound is organized in musical traditions all over the world. Each chapter uses a recording, notation, diagrams, and imaginative description to bring the music to life as sound pattern and creative process, while an introductory chapter proposes ways to think about musical structures cross-culturally.

  • Cope's Early Diagnosis of the Acute Abdomen

    This famous text is much beloved by medical students and physicians-in-training throughout the English-speaking world, as its many editions indicate. Despite its relatively narrow focus, it is chock full of the pearls of clinical wisdom that students and practitioners treasure, and many of these lessons apply to medicine in general. The book was well characterized by a reviewer of an earlier edition for The New England Journal of Medicine: "If only one book about surgery could be made available to physicians from all specialties, it should probably be Silen's recent revision of Cope's Early Diagnosis of the Acute Abdomen. Since the book first appeared more than 30 years ago, it has remained the classic treatise on the initial approach to abdominal pain." Because acute, severe abdominal pain is still a common problem whose misdiagnosis can result in quick death, each generation of beginning physicians is faced with the urgency of learning to make a diagnosis in this high anxiety situation and they appreciate the wise, humane, precisely detailed guidance offered by Cope and Silen. For the 21st Edition, Silen has again updated the text in a respectful but significant way. He has strengthened its emphasis on pitfalls in the interpretation of CT and ultrasound scans, on misadventures caused by over-reliance on blood tests and radiographs, and on careful history-taking to avoid the costs of inappropriate lab tests. He has also reviewed the data from a randomized clinical trial indicating that patients should receive adequate analgesia while awaiting a definitive diagnosis, a dictum that is contrary to traditional teaching.

  • Prince Among Slaves

    In this remarkable work, Terry Alford tells the story of Abd al Rahman Ibrahima, a Muslim slave who, in 1807, was recognized by an Irish ship's surgeon as the son of an African king who had saved his life many years earlier. "The Prince," as he had become known to local Natchez, Mississippi residents, had been captured in war when he was 26 years old, sold to slave traders, and shipped to America. Slave though he was, Ibrahima was an educated, aristocratic man, and he was made overseer of the large cotton and tobacco plantation of his master, who refused to sell him to the doctor for any price. After years of petitioning by Dr. Cox and others, Ibrahima finally gained freedom in 1828 through the intercession of U.S. Secretary of State Henry Clay. Sixty-six years old, Ibrahima sailed for Africa the following year, with his wife, and died there of fever just five months after his arrival. The year 2007 marks the thirtieth anniversary of the publication of Prince Among Slaves, the only full account of Ibrahima's life, pieced together from first-person accounts and historical documents gathered on three continents. It is not only a remarkable story, but also the story of a remarkable man, who endured the humiliation of slavery without ever losing his dignity or his hope for freedom. This thirtieth anniversary edition, which will be released to coincide with a major documentary being aired on Ibrahima's life, has been updated to include material discovered since the original printing, a fuller presentation and appreciation of other African Muslims in American slavery-Ibrahima's contemporaries-and a review of new and important literature and developments in the field.

  • A Diplomatic Revolution: Algeria's Fight for Independence and the Origins of the Post-Cold War Era

    Algeria sits at the crossroads of the Atlantic, European, Arab, and African worlds. Yet, unlike the wars in Korea and Vietnam, Algeria's fight for independence has rarely been viewed as an international conflict. Even forty years later, it is remembered as the scene of a national drama that culminated with Charles de Gaulle's decision to "grant" Algerians their independence despite assassination attempts, mutinies, and settler insurrection. Yet, as Matthew Connelly demonstrates, the war the Algerians fought occupied a world stage, one in which the U.S. and the USSR, Israel and Egypt, Great Britain, Germany, and China all played key roles. Recognizing the futility of confronting France in a purely military struggle, the Front de Liberation Nationale instead sought to exploit the Cold War competition and regional rivalries, the spread of mass communications and emigrant communities, and the proliferation of international and non-governmental organizations. By harnessing the forces of nascent globalization they divided France internally and isolated it from the world community. And, by winning rights and recognition as Algeria's legitimate rulers without actually liberating the national territory, they rewrote the rules of international relations. Based on research spanning three continents and including, for the first time, the rebels' own archives, this study offers a landmark reevaluation of one of the great anti-colonial struggles as well as a model of the new international history. It will appeal to historians of post-colonial studies, twentieth-century diplomacy, Europe, Africa, and the Middle East.

  • Silent Film and the Triumph of the American Myth

    Silent Film and the Triumph of the American Myth is a broad cultural study that connects the rise of film to the rise of America as a cultural center and world power in the twentieth century. Cohen argues that through the medium of film, America was able to sever its literary and linguistic ties to Europe, assert its cultural independence, and forge a unique form of cultural expression. Silent films drew on elements developed in popular forms of representation like photography, landscape panoramas, and vaudeville performance to create a medium that more accurately represented the American experience.

  • Ethics in Mental Health Research: Principles, guidance, and cases

    Research holds a key to preventing and effectively treating mental disorders, including ADHD, depression, schizophrenia, and substance abuse. Yet even as research holds out promise, mental health researchers face numerous ethical challenges. Responsible for ensuring participants are able and willing to grant consent, researchers must also constantly protect privacy and confidentiality. But for so many situations, the appropriate decisions are not so clear. An individual with cognitive deficits may have difficulty understanding a research study and granting informed consent, but nevertheless wants to participate. Many studies gather private information about medical records or illegal behaviour that could lead to emotional, social, or legal harm if shared, yet state laws and institutional review boards may require researchers to breach confidentiality in specific situations. Moreover, mental health consumers and other vulnerable research participants are frequently familiar with historical cases of abuse of human subjects, and may be mistrustful of researchers or fear exploitation. At the same time, researchers are often frustrated when they feel that advocates or institutional review boards erect barriers to research, even while failing to enhance the ethical treatment of participants. Ethical research is rarely simply about avoiding bad activities, and more frequently about how to pursue good research when multiple values and commitments conflict. Ethics in Mental Health Research explores how ethical issues arise in mental health research, and offers guidance to researchers who seek to comply with regulations while conducting research that is at once ethical and scientifically credible. Case studies used throughout illustrate a variety of situations and effective problem-solving strategies. This book is essential reading for mental health researchers, IRB members, and research advocates.

  • Workbook to Accompany Reporting and Writing Basics for the 21st Century

    This workbook accompanies Reporting and Writing Basics for the 21st Century.

  • Effortless Action: Wu-wei As Conceptual Metaphor and Spiritual Ideal in Early China

    This book presents a systematic account of the role of the personal spiritual ideal of wu-wei--literally "no doing," but better rendered as "effortless action"--in early Chinese thought. Edward Slingerland's analysis shows that wu-wei represents the most general of a set of conceptual metaphors having to do with a state of effortless ease and unself-consciousness. This concept of effortlessness, he contends, serves as a common ideal for both Daoist and Confucian thinkers. He also argues that this concept contains within itself a conceptual tension that motivates the development of early Chinese thought: the so-called "paradox of wu-wei," or the question of how one can consciously "try not to try." Methodologically, this book represents a preliminary attempt to apply the contemporary theory of conceptual metaphor to the study of early Chinese thought. Although the focus is upon early China, both the subject matter and methodology have wider implications. The subject of wu-wei is relevant to anyone interested in later East Asian religious thought or in the so-called "virtue-ethics" tradition in the West. Moreover, the technique of conceptual metaphor analysis--along with the principle of "embodied realism" upon which it is based--provides an exciting new theoretical framework and methodological tool for the study of comparative thought, comparative religion, intellectual history, and even the humanities in general. Part of the purpose of this work is thus to help introduce scholars in the humanities and social sciences to this methodology, and provide an example of how it may be applied to a particular sub-field.

  • Flow Cytometry for Biotechnology

    Flow cytometry is a sensitive and quantitative platform for the measurement of particle fluorescence. In flow cytometry, the particles in a sample flow in single file through a focused laser beam at rates of hundreds to thousands of particles per second. During the time each particle is in the laser beam, on the order of ten microseconds, one or more fluorescent dyes associated with that particle are excited. The fluorescence emitted from each particle is collected through a microscope objective, spectrally filtered, and detected with photomultiplier tubes. Flow cytometry is uniquely capable of the precise and quantitative molecular analysis of genomic sequence information, interactions between purified biomolecules and cellular function. Combined with automated sample handling for increased sample throughput, these features make flow cytometry a versatile platform with applications at many stages of drug discovery. Traditionally, the particles studied are cells, especially blood cells; flow cytometry is used extensively in immunology. This volume shows how flow cytometry is integrated into modern biotechnology, dealing with issues of throughput, content, sensitivity, and high throughput informatics with applications in genomics, proteomics and protein-protein interactions, drug discovery, vaccine development, plant and reproductive biology, pharmacology and toxicology, cell-cell interactions and protein engineering.

  • Introduction to Mineralogy with Companion CD: Introduction to Mineralogy with Companion CD

    Introduction to Mineralogy is a modern, introductory mineralogy book that provides detailed descriptions of over 100 minerals. It discusses classical crystallography, chemical bonding, controls on mineral structure, mineral stability, and crystal growth, providing readers with a solid foundation to help them better understand the nature and occurrence of minerals. Included with the book is a companion CD by Daniel J. Schulze, An Atlas of Minerals in Thin Section. It contains images of minerals as seen in thin section using a polarizing microscope, listed both by structure and composition and alphabetically. Each mineral page includes the mineral name, chemical formula, two to four images, and explantory text. All images can be enlarged to near-screen size.

  • Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Mindreading

    People are minded creatures; we have thoughts, feelings and emotions. More intriguingly, we grasp our own mental states, and conduct the business of ascribing them to ourselves and others without instruction in formal psychology. How do we do this? And what are the dimensions of our grasp of the mental realm? In this book, Alvin I. Goldman explores these questions with the tools of philosophy, developmental psychology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience. He refines an approach called simulation theory, which starts from the familiar idea that we understand others by putting ourselves in their mental shoes. Can this intuitive idea be rendered precise in a philosophically respectable manner, without allowing simulation to collapse into theorizing? Given a suitable definition, do empirical results support the notion that minds literally create (or attempt to create) surrogates of other peoples mental states in the process of mindreading? Goldman amasses a surprising array of evidence from psychology and neuroscience that supports this hypothesis.

  • If Your Adolescent Has an Anxiety Disorder: An Essential Resource for Parents

    An in-depth look at prevalent anxiety disorders in adolescents, this book is designed for parents of teens who have recently been diagnosed with or who are at risk for developing such a disorder. It is also for other adults, such as teachers and guidance counsellors, who are regularly in contact with at-risk adolescents. The book combines scientific expertise - including information about available treatments and up-to-date research findings on anxiety disorders-with the practical wisdom of parents who have raised teenagers with these illnesses. In clear and accessible language, Dr Edna B. Foa and Linda Wasmer Andrews explain in detail each of the four major anxiety disorders (social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder). The book includes tips on how to go about getting a diagnosis, what a diagnosis means, when and where to get treatment, and how to navigate the health care system. There is also advice on how to handle everyday life - both at home and at school - once the teen is diagnosed. Pointers on red flags to look out for and about the dangers of doing nothing are included as well to help parents and other adults deal effectively with adolescent anxiety disorders before they become debilitating.

  • Black and White Manhattan: The History of Racial Formation in Colonial New York City

    Probing the colonial history of New York City, Thelma Foote examines the broadly shared belief that slavery and antiblack racism were marginal to the experience of northern colonies in British North America. In this study of Dutch and English New York, she demonstrates that racial domination was a key foundation of society and culture in the seaport community and examines the interrelationship of racial tensions and breakdowns in colonial governance.

  • Mastery of Your Anxiety and Panic: Therapist Guide

    Now in its 4th edition, Mastery of Your Anxiety and Panic, Therapist Guide updates, extends, and improves upon the most effective, evidence-based treatment program available for panic disorder and agoraphobia. * Program is now organised by skill, instead of by session so treatment can be tailored to the individual * Presents breathing and thinking skills as methods for facing, rather than reducing fear and anxiety * Focuses on learning how to face agoraphobic situations and the scary physical symptoms of panic from an entirely new perspective * Includes a completely new chapter for adapting the treatment for effective delivery in 6 sessions within primary care settings * Provides up-to-date information on pharmacology Written and revised by the developers of the program, this book provides therapists with all the tools necessary to deliver effective treatment for panic disorder and agoraphobia. It provides step-by-step instructions for teaching clients the skills to overcome their fear of panic and panic attacks, as well as case vignettes and techniques for addressing atypical and problematic responses. This therapist guide is a one-of-a-kind resource that has been recommended for use by public health services around the world.

  • Acting for Singers: Creating Believable Singing Characters

    Written to meet the needs of thousands of students and pre-professional singers participating in production workshops and classes in opera and musical theater, Acting for Singers leads singing performers step by step from the studio or classroom through audition and rehearsals to a successful performance. Using a clear, systematic, positive approach, this practical guide explains how to analyze a script or libretto, shows how to develop a character building on material in the score, and gives the singing performer the tools to act believably. More than just a "how-to" acting book, however, Acting for Singers also addresses the problems of concentration, trust, projection, communication, and the self-doubt that often afflicts performers pursuing the goal of believable performance. Part I establishes the basic principles of acting and singing together, and teaches the reader how to improvise as a key tool to explore and develop characters. Part II teaches the singer how to analyze theatrical work for rehearsing, and performing. Using concrete examples from Carmen and West Side Story, and imaginative exercises following each chapter, this text teaches all singers how to be effective singing actors.

  • Science, Truth, and Democracy

    Striving to boldly redirect the philosophy of science, this book by renowned philosopher Philip Kitcher examines the heated debate surrounding the role of science in shaping our lives. Kitcher explores the sharp divide between those who believe that the pursuit of scientific knowledge is always valuable and necessary--the purists--and those who believe that it invariably serves the interests of people in positions of power. In a daring turn, he rejects both perspectives, working out a more realistic image of the sciences--one that allows for the possibility of scientific truth, but nonetheless permits social consensus to determine which avenues to investigate. He then proposes a democratic and deliberative framework for responsible scientists to follow.

    Controversial, powerful, yet engaging, this volume will appeal to a wide range of readers. Kitcher's nuanced analysis and authorititative conclusion will interest countless scientists as well as all readers of science--scholars and laypersons alike.

  • Learning from the Left: Children's Literature, the Cold War, and Radical Politics in the United States

    The ways in which the Cold War and McCarthyism circumscribed dissent are well known; less documented are the opportunities they inadvertently created. This book shows how pervasive and influential Left politics were in children's book writing, illustrating, publishing, and dissemination during the middle third of the twentieth century - precisely the time when Americans were most concerned about protecting their children against Communist influences. Many critically acclaimed and best-selling children's books were written and/or illustrated by Communists, former Communists, or "fellow travellers," the same groups of people who were fired from teaching jobs and blacklisted. Children's literature written by those on the Left embraced pan-ethnic, anti-racist, pro-labor, and internationalist values, injecting books for children with real-world concerns, and leaving lasting changes on books for youth.

  • Conservation Medicine: Ecological Health in Practice

    Conservation medicine focuses on the cross-over between ecosystem, animal and human health. Conservation biology emerged as a "crisis" discipline in the 1980s at the interface between ecology, environmental policy and management; and work in the biomedical and veterinary sciences is now being folded into conservation biology, to explore the connections between animal and human health. It traces the environmental sources of pathogens and pollutants in order to develop a rounded, interdisciplinary understanding of the ecological causes of changes in human and animal health, and the consequences of diseases to populations and ecological communities.

  • Meeting Jimmie Rodgers: How America's Original Roots Music Hero Changed the Pop Sounds of a Century

    In the nearly eight decades since his death from tuberculosis at age thirty-five, singer-songwriter Jimmie Rodgers has been an inspiration for numerous top performers--from Woody Guthrie, Lead Belly, Bill Monroe and Hank Williams to Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Dolly Parton, Bob Dylan, and Beck. How did this Mississippi-born vaudevillian, a former railroad worker who performed so briefly so long ago, produce tones, tunes, and themes that have had such broad influence and made him the model for the way American roots music stars could become popular heroes? In Meeting Jimmie Rodgers, the first book to explore the deep legacy of "The Singing Brakeman" from a twenty-first century perspective, Barry Mazor offers a lively look at Rodgers' career, tracing his rise from working-class obscurity to the pinnacle of renown that came with such hits as "Blue Yodel" and "In the Jailhouse Now." As Mazor shows, Rodgers brought emotional clarity and a unique sense of narrative drama to every song he performed, whether tough or sentimental, comic or sad. His wistful singing, falsetto yodels, bold flat-picking guitar style, and sometimes censorable themes---sex, crime, and other edgy topics--set him apart from most of his contemporaries. But more than anything else, Mazor suggests, it was Rodgers' shape-shifting ability to assume many public personas--working stiff, decked-out cowboy, suave ladies' man--that connected him to such a broad public and set the stage for the stars who followed him. Mazor goes beyond Rodgers's own life to map the varied places his music has gone, forever changing not just country music but also rock and roll, blues, jazz, bluegrass, Western, commercial folk, and much more. In reconstructing this far-flung legacy, Mazor enables readers to meet Rodgers and his music anew--not as an historical figure, but as a vibrant, immediate force.

  • Goddess of the Market: Ayn Rand and the American Right

    Worshipped by her fans, denounced by her enemies, and forever shadowed by controversy and scandal, the novelist and philosopher Ayn Rand was a powerful thinker whose views on government and markets shaped the conservative movement from its earliest days. Drawing on unprecedented access to Rand's private papers and the original, unedited versions of Rand's journals, Jennifer Burns offers a groundbreaking reassessment of this key cultural figure, examining her life, her ideas, and her impact on conservative political thought. Goddess of the Market follows Rand from her childhood in Russia through her meteoric rise from struggling Hollywood screenwriter to bestselling novelist, including the writing of her wildly successful The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged. Burns highlights the two facets of Rand's work that make her a perennial draw for those on the right: her promotion of capitalism, and her defense of limited government. Both sprang from her early, bitter experience of life under Communism, and became among the most deeply enduring of her messages, attracting a diverse audience of college students and intellectuals, business people and Republican Party activists, libertarians and conservatives. The book also traces the development of Rand's Objectivist philosophy and her relationship with Nathaniel Branden, her closest intellectual partner, with whom she had an explosive falling out in 1968. This extraordinary book captures the life of the woman who was a tireless champion of capitalism and the freedom of the individual, and whose ideas are still devoured by eager students, debated on blogs, cited by political candidates, and promoted by corporate tycoons.

  • China Marine: An Infantryman's Life after World War II

    Hailed as "one of the finest memoirs to emerge from any war" by acclaimed author Paul Fussell, With the Old Breed remains the most powerful and moving account of the U.S. Marines in World War II. Now, with his long-awaited sequel, China Marine, E. B. Sledge continues his story where With the Old Breed left off and recounts the compelling conclusion of his Marine career. After Japan's surrender in 1945, Sledge and his company were sent to China to maintain order and to calm the seething cauldron of political and ideological unrest created by opposing factions. His regiment was the first Marine unit to return to the ancient city of Peiping (now Beijing) where they witnessed the last of old China and the rise of the Communist state. Sledge also recounts the difficulty of returning to his hometown of Mobile, Alabama, and resuming civilian life while haunted by shadows of close combat. Through the discipline of writing and the study of biology, Sledge shows how he came to terms with the terrifying memories that had plagued him for years. Poignant and compelling, China Marine provides a frank depiction of the real costs of war, emotional and psychological as well as physical, and reveals the enduring bond that develops between men who face the horrors of war.

  • Harvey Cushing: A Life in Surgery

    Here is the first biography to appear in fifty years of Harvey Cushing, a giant of American medicine and without doubt the greatest figure in the history of brain surgery. Drawing on new collections of intimate personal and family papers, diaries and patient records, Michael Bliss captures Cushing's professional and personal life in remarkable detail. Bliss paints an engaging portrait of a man of ambition, boundless, driving energy, a fanatical work ethic, a penchant for self-promotion and ruthlessness, more than a touch of egotism and meanness, and an enormous appetite for life. Equally important, Bliss traces the rise of American surgery as seen through the eyes of one of its pioneers. The book describes how Cushing, working in the early years of the 20th century, developed remarkable new techniques that let surgeons open the skull, expose the brain, and attack tumors--all with a much higher rate of success than previously known. Indeed, Cushing made the miraculous in surgery an everyday event, as he and his team compiled an astonishing record of treating more than two thousand tumors. Moreover, Cushing was also a leading authority on the pituitary gland and a pioneer of endocrinology. And in his spare time, he won a Pulitzer Prize for his massive two-volume biography of William Osler, who was Cushing's colleague. This is the definite Cushing biography, an epic narrative of high surgical adventure. Written by a prize-winning medical historian and acclaimed author, it captures the highs and lows of an extraordinary life, illuminating the contributions of a surgeon who has earned an enduring place in the pantheon of medical history.

  • The Book of Job in Medieval Jewish Philosophy

    This book analyzes the history of the interpretation of the book of Job by medieval Jewish exegetes. The scholarship on medieval Jewish thought has focused largely on the systematic philosophical aspects of this literature. Eisen, however, is concerned with exegesis qua exegesis. He offers a close examination of commentaries on Job written by six major thinkers: Saadiah Goan (882-942, Egypt and Babylon), Moses Maimonides (1138-1204, Spain and Egypt), Samuel ibn Tibbon (1160-1230, Provence), Zerahiah Hen (13th Century, Barcelona and Rome), Levi Gersonides (1288-1344, Provence), and Simeon ben Zeham Duran (1361-1444, Majorca and Algiers). Saadiah and Maimonides wrote in Arabic, the other four in Hebrew. Eisen looks at the relationship between the commentaries and their antecedent sources as well as their relationship to the broader context of medieval Jewish thought. He also provides an overview of the questions the commentators confronted about the historicity, national origin, and "Jewishness" of the text. He argues that the commentaries on Job are linked in a coherent and evolving tradition of interpretation and he identifies various views of providence as the central concern of them all.

  • Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management for Individuals Living with HIV: Facilitator Guide

    For individuals living with HIV, stress can have a critical impact on emotional and physical well-being. Many HIV-infected individuals feel a loss of control over their lives, experience social isolation, and may suffer from anxiety and depression. Stress has been shown to decrease immune functioning, which is a significant concern for HIV-infected individuals. Written by the developer of the treatment, this manual presents an empirically supported, group treatment program that teaches HIV-infected individuals how to manage their stress. This comprehensive Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management (CBSM) program combines stress management with relaxation training. Each group meeting introduces a new relaxation method, such as progressive muscle relaxation, imagery, and meditation. Stress management skills build on one another and include cognitive restructuring, coping strategies, and establishing a strong social network. By the end of the program, participants are equipped with a variety of inter-related techniques that they can use to reduce stress and improve their quality of life. The guide is designed to be used in conjunction with the corresponding workbook, which provides exercises to be completed in session, monitoring forms, and homework assignments. Together they include all the material and information needed to effectively implement this program.

  • Fanny Kemble's Civil Wars

    A British stage star turned Georgia plantation mistress, Fanny Kemble is perhaps best remembered as a critic of slavery--and an influential opponent of this institution during the years leading up to the Civil War. By the mid-1830s, American society was firmly in the grip of Kemble's celebrity as an actress--young ladies adopted "Fanny Kemble curls," a tulip was named in her honor, and lecture attendance at Harvard fell so sharply on afternoons of Kemble's matinees that professors threatened to cancel classes. Catherine Clinton's insightful biography chronicles these early portraits of Fanny's life and shows how her role in society changed drastically after her bitter and short-lived marriage to the heir of a Georgia plantation owner, whom she derisively called her "lord and master." We witness the publication of Journal of a Residence on a Georgia Plantation, in which Kemble hauntingly records the "simple horror" and misery she saw among the slaves. The raw power of her words made for an influential anti-slavery tract, which swayed European sentiment toward the Union cause. The book was embraced by Northern critics as "a permanent and most valuable chapter in our history" (Atlantic Monthly). In Fanny Kemble's Civil Wars, Catherine Clinton reveals how one woman's life reflected in microcosm the public battles--over slavery, the role of women, and sectionalism--that fueled our nation's greatest conflict and have permanently marked our history.

  • Norse Mythology: A Guide to Gods, Heroes, Rituals, and Beliefs

    Norse Mythology explores the magical myths and legends of Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland and Viking-Age Greenland--outlining along the way the prehistoric tales and beliefs from these regions that have remained embedded in the imagination of the world. The book begins with an Introduction that helps put Scandinavian mythology in place in history, followed by a chapter that explains the meaning of mythic time, and a third section that presents in-depth explanations of each mythological term. These fascinating entries identify particular deities and giants, as well as the places where they dwell and the varied and wily means by which they forge their existence and battle one another. We meet Thor, one of the most powerful gods, who specializes in killing giants using a hammer made for him by dwarfs, not to mention myriad trolls, ogres, humans and strange animals. We learn of the ongoing struggle between the gods, who create the cosmos, and the jotnar, or giants, who aim to destroy it. In the enchanted world where this mythology takes place, we encounter turbulent rivers, majestic mountains, dense forests, storms, fierce winters, eagles, ravens, salmon and snakes in a landscape closely resembling Scandinavia. Beings travel on ships and on horseback; they eat slaughtered meat and drink mead. Spanning from the inception of the universe and the birth of human beings to the universe's destruction and the mythic future, these sparkling tales of creation and destruction, death and rebirth, gods and heroes will entertain readers and offer insight into the relationship between Scandinavian myth, history, and culture.

  • Christ Killers: The Jews and the Passion from the Bible to the Big Screen

    The New Testament accounts of Jesus' crucifixion have stood at the bedrock of Christianity since it's birth in the 1st century, and they remain among the essential foundations of Western culture in the 21st. These Gospel narratives of the Passion - the arrest, trial, scourging, and execution of Jesus - cast the Jews as those responsible, directly and indirectly, for the death of their Messiah and the son of God. Cohen tracks the image of the Jew as the murderer of the Messiah and God from its origins to its most recent expressions. A great deal has been written about Christian anti-Semitism, its roots, and its horrific consequences in world history. This is the first book, however to focus on the powerful myth that has driven so much murderous hatred. An important addition to the literature on Jewish-Christian relations, it should appeal to a wide variety of readers in both communities.

  • The Great Terror: A Reassessment

    The definitive work on Stalin's purges, Robert Conquest's The Great Terror was universally acclaimed when it first appeared in 1968. Harrison Salisbury called it "brilliant...not only an odyssey of madness, tragedy, and sadism, but a work of scholarship and literary craftsmanship." And in recent years it has received equally high praise in the former Soviet Union, where it is now considered the definitive account of the period.

    When Conquest wrote the original volume, he relied heavily on unofficial sources. With the advent of glasnost, an avalanche of new material became available, and Conquest mined this enormous cache to write, in 1990, a substantially new edition of his classic work, adding enormously to the detail. Both a leading historian and a highly respected poet, Conquest blends profound research with evocative prose, providing not only an authoritative account of Stalin's purges, but also a compelling and eloquent chronicle of one of this century's most tragic events. He provides gripping accounts of everything from the three great "Moscow Trials," to methods of obtaining confessions, the purge of writers and other members of the intelligentsia, life in the labor camps, and many other key matters.
    On the fortieth anniversary of the first edition, in the light of further archival releases, and new material published in Moscow and elsewhere, it remains remarkable how many of Conquest's most disturbing conclusions have continued to bear up. This volume, featuring a new preface by Conquest, rounds out the picture of this huge historical tragedy, further establishing the book as the key study of one of the twentieth centurys most lethal, and longest-misunderstood, offenses against humanity.

  • The Most Democratic Branch: How the Courts Serve America

    Many critics attack federal judges as anti-democratic elitists, activists out of step with the mainstream of American thought. But others argue that judges should stand alone as the ultimate guardians of American values, placing principle before the views of the people. In The Most Democratic Branch, Jeffrey Rosen disagrees with both assertions. Contrary to what interest groups may claim, he contends that, from the days of John Marshall right up to the present, the federal courts by and large have reflected the opinions of the mainstream. More important, he argues that the Supreme Court is most successful when it defers to the constitutional views of the American people, as represented most notably by Congress and the Presidency. And on the rare occasion when they departed from the consensus, the result has often been a disaster. To illustrate, Rosen provides a penetrating look at some of the most important Supreme Court cases in American history--cases involving racial equality, affirmative action, abortion, gay rights and gay marriage, the right to die, electoral disputes, and civil liberties in wartime. Rosen shows that the most notorious constitutional decisions in American history--the ones that have been most strenuously criticized, such as Dred Scott or Roe v. Wade--have gone against mainstream opinion. By contrast, the most successful decisions--from Marbury v. Madison to Brown v. Board of Education--have avoided imposing constitutional principles over the wishes of the people. Rosen concludes that the judiciary works best when it identifies the constitutional principles accepted by a majority of Americans, and enforces them unequivocally as fundamental law. Jeffrey Rosen is one of the most respected legal experts writing today, a regular contributor to The New York Times Magazine and the Legal Affairs Editor of The New Republic. The provocative arguments that he puts forth here are bound to fuel heated debate at a time when the federal judiciary is already the focus of fierce criticism.

  • The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789

    The first book to appear in the illustrious Oxford History of the United States, this critically acclaimed volume--a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize--offers an unsurpassed history of the Revolutionary War and the birth of the American republic. Beginning with the French and Indian War and continuing to the election of George Washington as first president, Robert Middlekauff offers a panoramic history of the conflict between England and America, highlighting the drama and anguish of the colonial struggle for independence. Combining the political and the personal, he provides a compelling account of the key events that precipitated the war, from the Stamp Act to the Tea Act, tracing the gradual gathering of American resistance that culminated in the Boston Tea Party and "the shot heard 'round the world." The heart of the book features a vivid description of the eight-year-long war, with gripping accounts of battles and campaigns, ranging from Bunker Hill and Washington's crossing of the Delaware to the brilliant victory at Hannah's Cowpens and the final triumph at Yorktown, paying particular attention to what made men fight in these bloody encounters. The book concludes with an insightful look at the making of the Constitution in the Philadelphia Convention of 1787 and the struggle over ratification. Through it all, Middlekauff gives the reader a vivid sense of how the colonists saw these events and the importance they gave to them. Common soldiers and great generals, Sons of Liberty and African slaves, town committee-men and representatives in congress--all receive their due. And there are particularly insightful portraits of such figures as Sam and John Adams, James Otis, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, and many others. This new edition has been revised and expanded, with fresh coverage of topics such as mob reactions to British measures before the War, military medicine, women's role in the Revolution, American Indians, the different kinds of war fought by the Americans and the British, and the ratification of the Constitution. The book also has a new epilogue and an updated bibliography. The cause for which the colonists fought, liberty and independence, was glorious indeed. Here is an equally glorious narrative of an event that changed the world, capturing the profound and passionate struggle to found a free nation.

  • Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture: 2 volumes

    Covering all aspects of classical art from the Etruscans to the fall of the Roman Empire, The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art & Architecture is a comprehensive reference source on this important field of study. Drawing on the expansive scholarship of The Dictionary of Art (1996, 34 vols) and Grove Art Online, and adding dozens of new entries, the Encyclopedia includes all subject areas in the classical arts, including philosophers, rulers, writers and artists, architecture, ceramics, sculpture, and more. Arranged alphabetically, this two-volume set contains over 800 entries tracing the development of the art forms in classical civilizations such as ancient Greece and Rome. Illustrated with 400 halftones, maps and line drawings, and 32 color plates, the Encyclopedia is a reliable and convenient resource covering this field of everlasting significance in the development of western culture.

  • Tuned Out: Why Americans Under 40 Don't Follow the News

    At a rate never before seen in American history, young adults are abandoning traditional news media. Tuned Out: Why Americans Under 40 Don't Follow the News examines the reasons behind this problem and its consequences for American society. Author David T. Z. Mindich speaks directly to young people to discover why some tune in while others tune out--and how America might help them tune back in. Based on discussions with young adults from across the United States, Mindich investigates the decline in news consumption over the past four decades. In 1972, 74% of Americans in their mid-30s said they read a newspaper every day. Today, fewer than 28% do so. The average viewer age at CNN is currently about 60 years old. And while many point to the Internet as the best hope for rekindling interest in the news, only 11% of young people list the news as a major reason for logging on--entertainment, e-mail, and Instant Messenger are ranked far higher on their list. Exploring the political, journalistic, and social consequences of this decrease in political awareness, Mindich poses the question: What are the consequences of two successive generations tuning out? He asserts that as young adults abandon the kinds of news needed to make political decisions, they have unwittingly ceded power to their elders. In an engaged and intelligent way, Mindich outlines these problems and proposes real solutions. An indispensable resource for anyone interested in media or politics, Tuned Out: Why Americans Under 40 Don't Follow the News is also ideal for undergraduate and graduate students in journalism, media, communication, political science, American studies, sociology, and education.

  • Sustaining Life: How Human Health Depends on Biodiversity

    The Earth's biodiversity-the rich variety of life on our planet-is disappearing at an alarming rate. And while many books have focused on the expected ecological consequences, or on the aesthetic, ethical, sociological, or economic dimensions of this loss, Sustaining Life is the first book to examine the full range of potential threats that diminishing biodiversity poses to human health. Edited and written by Harvard Medical School physicians Eric Chivian and Aaron Bernstein, along with more than 100 leading scientists who contributed to writing and reviewing the book, Sustaining Life presents a comprehensive--and sobering--view of how human medicines, biomedical research, the emergence and spread of infectious diseases, and the production of food, both on land and in the oceans, depend on biodiversity. The book's ten chapters cover everything from what biodiversity is and how human activity threatens it to how we as individuals can help conserve the world's richly varied biota. Seven groups of organisms, some of the most endangered on Earth, provide detailed case studies to illustrate the contributions they have already made to human medicine, and those they are expected to make if we do not drive them to extinction. Drawing on the latest research, but written in language a general reader can easily follow, Sustaining Life argues that we can no longer see ourselves as separate from the natural world, nor assume that we will not be harmed by its alteration. Our health, as the authors so vividly show, depends on the health of other species and on the vitality of natural ecosystems. With a foreword by E.O. Wilson and a prologue by Kofi Annan, and more than 200 poignant color illustrations, Sustaining Life contributes essential perspective to the debate over how humans affect biodiversity and a compelling demonstration of the human health costs.

  • Geostatistical Reservoir Modeling

    This book brings the practice of petroleum geostatistics into a coherent framework, focusing on tools, techniques, examples, and guidance. It will emphasize interaction between geophysicists, geologists, and engineers. Intended as a reference text for practitioners, the book will also be appropriate for "short courses" and advanced undergraduate or graduate courses in reservoir characterization.

  • Ethics and Epidemiology

    Written by epidemiologists, ethicists and legal scholars, this book provides an in-depth account of the moral problems that often confront epidemiologists, including both theoretical and practical issues. The first edition has sold almost three thousand copies since it was published in 1996. This edition is fully revised and includes three new chapters:Ethical Issues in Public Health Practice, Ethical Issues in Genetic Epidemiology, and Ethical Issues in International Health Research and Epidemiology. These chapters collectively address important developments of the past decade. Three chapters from the first edition have also been reorganized: Ethicall Optimized Study Deisgns in Epidemiology, Ethical Issues in Epidemiologic Research with Children, and The Ethics of Epidemiologic Research with Older Populations. Instead of standing alone, these chapters have been integrated into chapters on informed consent, confidentiality and privacy protection, and community-based intervention studies.

  • A Smoother Pebble: Mathematical Explorations

    This book takes a novel look at the topics of school mathematics--arithmetic, geometry, algebra, and calculus. In this stroll on the mathematical seashore we hope to find, quoting Newton, "...a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary..." This book assembles a collection of mathematical pebbles that are important as well as beautiful.

  • Dictionary of Ancient Deities

    Nothing reveals more about a civilization than the gods and goddesses it worshipped. For thousands of years humans have fashioned stories about divine beings to explain their most mysterious, terrifying, and exalted experiences. Today the names of many of these deities have fallen into obscurity. The Dictionary of Ancient Deities brings these gods and goddesses back to light.
    Here, in one superbly written volume, is every known divine being throughout recorded history, from Athena and Brahma to the evil demon king Ngworekara of the African Fan people and the Babylonian dream messenger Zaqar. With over 10,000 entries, The Dictionary of Ancient Deities is the most comprehensive reference of its kind, covering not only gods and goddesses, but also spirits, places, festivals, sacred texts and objects, heroes, monsters, demigods, and the plethora of fantastic mythical beasts that have populated the human imagination from time immemorial. The encyclopedia also includes many deities often missing from standard collections, notably from Inuit, Native American, and African cultures. Alphabetically arranged entries provide the name of each deity (with alternate spellings), followed by the tribe or culture that worshipped the deity. Most importantly, the entries--whether brief descriptions or longer essays--offer lucid and engaging explanations of the origins and functions of the god or goddess.
    With a comprehensive index and an extensive bibliography, The Dictionary of Ancient Deities is the best choice for anyone intrigued by the rich pantheon of divine beings that have mirrored the human psyche and shaped our earliest civilizations.

  • When Prisoners Come Home: Parole and Prisoner Reentry

    In 2003, well over half a million jailed Americans will leave prison and return to society. Largely uneducated, unskilled, often without family support, and with the stigma of a prison record hanging over them, many if not most will experience serious social and psychological problems after release. Fewer than one in three prisoners receive substance abuse or mental health treatment while incarcerated, and each year fewer and fewer participate in the dwindling number of vocational or educational pre-release programs, leaving many all but unemployable. Not surprisingly, the great majority is rearrested, most within six months of their release. What happens when all those sent down the river come back up--and out? As long as there have been prisons, society has struggled with how best to help prisoners reintegrate once released. But the current situation is unprecedented. As a result of the quadrupling of the American prison population in the last quarter century, the number of returning offenders dwarfs anything in America's history. What happens when a large percentage of inner-city men, mostly Black and Hispanic, are regularly extracted, imprisoned, and then returned a few years later in worse shape and with dimmer prospects than when they committed the crime resulting in their imprisonment? What toll does this constant "churning" exact on a community? And what do these trends portend for public safety? A crisis looms, and the criminal justice and social welfare system is wholly unprepared to confront it. Drawing on dozens of interviews with inmates, former prisoners, and prison officials, Joan Petersilia convincingly shows us how the current system is failing, and failing badly. Unwilling merely to sound the alarm, Petersilia explores the harsh realities of prisoner reentry and offers specific solutions to prepare inmates for release, reduce recidivism, and restore them to full citizenship, while never losing sight of the demands of public safety. As the number of ex-convicts in America continues to grow, their systemic marginalization threatens the very society their imprisonment was meant to protect. America spent the last decade debating who should go to prison and for how long. Now it's time to decide what to do when prisoners come home.

  • The Common Law of Colonial America: Volume I: The Chesapeake and New England 1607-1660

    William E. Nelson here proposes a new beginning in the study of colonial legal history. Examining all archival legal material for the period 1607-1776 and synthesizing existing scholarship in a four-volume series, The Common Law in Colonial America shows how the legal systems of Britain's thirteen North American colonies--initially established in response to divergent political, economic, and religious initiatives--slowly converged into a common American legal order that differed substantially from English common law. Drawing on groundbreaking and overwhelmingly in-depth research into local court records and statutes, the first volume explores how the law of the Chesapeake colonies--Virginia and Maryland--diverged sharply from the New England colonies--Massachusetts Bay, Connecticut, New Haven, Plymouth, and Rhode Island--and traces the roots of these dissimilarities from their initial settlement until approximately 1660. Nelson pointedly examines the disparate motives of the legal systems in the respective colonies as they dealt with religion, price and labor regulations, crimes, public morals, the status of women, and the enforcement of contractual obligations. He reveals how Virginians' zeal for profit led to a harsh legal framework that efficiently squeezed payment out of debtors and labor out of servants; whereas the laws of Massachusetts were primarily concerned with the preservation of local autonomy and the moral values of family-centered farming communities. The law in the other New England colonies, Nelson argues, gravitated towards the Massachusetts model, while Maryland's law, gravitated toward that of Virginia. Comprehensive, authoritative, and extensively researched, The Common Law in Colonial America, Volume 1: The Chesapeake and New England, 1607-1660 is the definitive resource on the beginnings of the common law and its evolution during this vibrant era in America's history. William E. Nelson here proposes a new beginning in the study of colonial legal history.

  • Goodbye Father: The Celibate Male Priesthood and the Future of the Catholic Church

    In the last half-century, the number of Catholic priests has plummeted by 40% while the number of Catholics has skyrocketed, up 65%. The specter of a faith defined by full pews and empty altars hangs heavy over the church. The root cause of this priest shortage is the church's insistence on mandatory celibacy. Given the potential recruitment advantages of abandoning the celibacy requirement, why, Richard A. Schoenherr asks, is the conservative Catholic coalition--headed by the pope--so adamantly opposed to a married clergy? The answer, he argues, is that accepting married priests would be but the first step toward ordaining women and thus forever altering the demographics of a resolutely male religious order. Yet Schoenherr believes that such change is not only necessary but unavoidable if the church is to thrive. The church's current stop-gap approach of enlisting laypeople to perform all but the central element of the mass only further serves to undermine the power of the celibate priesthood. Perhaps most importantly, doctrinal changes, a growing pluralism in the church, and the feminist movement among nuns and laywomen are exerting a growing influence on Catholicism. Concluding that the collapse of celibate exclusivity is all but inevitable, Goodbye Father presents an urgent and compelling portrait of the future of organized Catholicism.

  • Handbook to Life in Medieval and Early Modern Japan

    This book is an introduction to significant people and events - cultural, social, political, and historical - spanning the beginning of the Kamakura period in 1185 through the end of the Edo (Tokugawa) period in 1868.

  • Your Rights As Tenant

    First-time renters and seasoned renters alike will be grateful for this volume, which covers the legal rights of tenants through every stage of the housing process. From dealing with rental agents and issues of fair housing and discrimination, to the rights one has once a lease is signed, this guide clearly spells out the rights as well as the responsibilities of those renting property. The final stages of tenanthood are also covered in depth, including renegotiating the lease, breaking the lease, obtaining security deposit refunds, and dealing with eviction. Other topics covered include: the search for rental property, the application process, credit and background checks, fair housing and discrimination issues, negotiating the lease terms, and security deposits. This almanac specifically addresses the landlord-tenant relationship, and sets forth the basic legal rights afforded the tenant under law. In addition, the tenant's rights during a co-op/condominium conversation of the rental property are also discussed. The Appendix provides applicable statutes, sample forms, and other pertinent information. The Glossary contains defintions of many of the erms used throughout the almanac. The Legal Almanac series consists of over 70 handy guides for the lay person on all aspects of the law. Each volume includes an overview of the topic followed by chapters on the major issues in that subject. Each volume contains an Appendix containing several primary source documents as well as practical forms and checklists. A Glossary defines any technical terms used in the text.

  • Understanding Rheology

    Understanding Rheology is a main text for advanced undergraduate or graduate level courses taught in departments of chemical and mechanical engineering. Rheology is the study of the deformation and flow of materials. The plastic flow solids, such as molten rock, and the physical properties of complex fluids such as polymers, colloids, foams, gels are among the chief concerns of rheology. The field of rheology is an industrially important one, and one that is growing rapidly. Rheology is of primary importance in polymer processing, food processing, coating and printing, and many other manufacturing processes. This text begins with refresher sections on tensor and vector operations and Newtonian fluid mechanics which the students may or may not have retained from their fluid mechanis course (a certain prerequesite to this course), but which are essential to comprehending the material in this subject. Each chapter contains a problem set designed to reinforce materal covered in the chapter. The problems, samples, and mathematics in this text are appropriate to an undergraduate readership. This book also contains discussion of current jobs such as birefringence and the modern state of optics in measuring rheological phenomena. This text is also designed for practicing engineers and scientists to use as a self-teaching guide to those rheological principles they find applicable to their work. The text contains example problems that will allow the reader to practice the subject under discussion. The appendices in this text contain reference material which should be of interest to this audience.

  • Tocqueville: A Very Short Introduction

    No one has ever described American democracy with more accurate insight or more profoundly than Alexis de Tocqueville. After meeting with Americans on extensive travels in the United States, and intense study of documents and authorities, he authored the landmark Democracy in America, publishing its two volumes in 1835 and 1840. Ever since, this book has been the best source for every serious attempt to understand America and democracy itself. Yet Tocqueville himself remains a mystery behind the elegance of his style. Now one of our leading authorities on Tocqueville explains him in this splendid new entry in Oxford's acclaimed Very Short Introductions series. Harvey Mansfield addresses his subject as a thinker, clearly and incisively exploring Tocqueville's writings-not only his masterpiece, but also his secret Recollections, intended for posterity alone, and his unfinished work on his native France, The Old Regime and the Revolution. Tocqueville was a liberal, Mansfield writes, but not of the usual sort. The many elements of his life found expression in his thought: his aristocratic ancestry, his ventures in politics, his voyages abroad, his hopes and fears for America, and his disappointment with France. All his writings show a passion for political liberty and insistence on human greatness. Perhaps most important, he saw liberty not in theories, but in the practice of self-government in America. Ever an opponent of abstraction, he offered an analysis that forces us to consider what we actually do in our politics--suggesting that theory itself may be an enemy of freedom. And that, Mansfield writes, makes him a vitally important thinker for today. Translator of an authoritative edition of Democracy in America, Harvey Mansfield here offers the fruit of decades of research and reflection in a clear, insightful, and marvelously compact introduction. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

  • Effortless Action: Wu-wei as Conceptual Metaphor and Spiritual Ideal in Early China

    This book presents a systematic account of the role of the personal spiritual ideal of wu-wei--literally "no doing," but better rendered as "effortless action"--in early Chinese thought. Edward Slingerland's analysis shows that wu-wei represents the most general of a set of conceptual metaphors having to do with a state of effortless ease and unself-consciousness. This concept of effortlessness, he contends, serves as a common ideal for both Daoist and Confucian thinkers. He also argues that this concept contains within itself a conceptual tension that motivates the development of early Chinese thought: the so-called "paradox of wu-wei," or the question of how one can consciously "try not to try." Methodologically, this book represents a preliminary attempt to apply the contemporary theory of conceptual metaphor to the study of early Chinese thought. Although the focus is upon early China, both the subject matter and methodology have wider implications. The subject of wu-wei is relevant to anyone interested in later East Asian religious thought or in the so-called "virtue-ethics" tradition in the West. Moreover, the technique of conceptual metaphor analysis--along with the principle of "embodied realism" upon which it is based--provides an exciting new theoretical framework and methodological tool for the study of comparative thought, comparative religion, intellectual history, and even the humanities in general. Part of the purpose of this work is thus to help introduce scholars in the humanities and social sciences to this methodology, and provide an example of how it may be applied to a particular sub-field.

  • In the Houses of the Holy: Led Zeppelin and the Power of Rock Music

    In the Houses of the Holy: Led Zeppelin and the Power of Rock Music examines the important issues surrounding the music and image of one of the most innovative and successful rock bands ever. The band influence is examined both through an explication of the music and an ethnographic study of Led Zeppelin fans, who are quite candid about their likes and dislikes in the band's history. More than just a sampling of opinion, Fast uses this research to underscore her own findings on gender and sexuality, the creation of myth and the use of ritual, the appropriation of Eastern musics and the blues, the physicality of the music, and the use of the body in performance. Specific pieces, "Dazed and Confused", "Kashmir", "Stairway to Heaven", and "Whole Lotta Love" form the basis of an examination of the group's long-lasting appeal and their musical development.

  • Indigenous Peoples in International Law

    In this thoroughly revised and updated edition, Anaya incorporates references to all the latest treaties and recent developments in international law's treatment of indigenous peoples. Anaya provides new evidence to support the claim that while historical trends in international law facilitated the colonization of indigenous peoples and their lands, modern international law's human rights program has been responsive to indigenous peoples' aspirations to survive as distinct communities in control of their own destinies. Against this historical backdrop, James Anaya discusses a new generation of international treaties that may be capable of implementing international normsning concerning indigenous peoples.

  • How Cancer Crossed the Color Line

    In the course of the 20th century, cancer went from being perceived as a white woman's nemesis to a "democratic disease" to a fearsome threat in communities of color. Drawing on film and fiction, on medical and epidemiological evidence, and on patients' accounts, Keith Wailoo tracks this transformation in cancer awareness, revealing how not only awareness, but cancer prevention, treatment, and survival have all been refracted through the lens of race. Spanning more than a century, the book offers a sweeping account of the forces that simultaneously defined cancer as an intensely individualized and personal experience linked to whites, often categorizing people across the color line as racial types lacking similar personal dimensions. Wailoo describes how theories of risk evolved with changes in women's roles, with African-American and new immigrant migration trends, with the growth of federal cancer surveillance, and with diagnostic advances, racial protest, and contemporary health activism. The book examines such powerful and transformative social developments as the mass black migration from rural south to urban north in the 1920s and 1930s, the World War II experience at home and on the war front, and the quest for civil rights and equality in health in the 1950s and '60s. It also explores recent controversies that illuminate the diversity of cancer challenges in America, such as the high cancer rates among privileged women in Marin County, California, the heavy toll of prostate cancer among black men, and the questions about why Vietnamese-American women's cervical cancer rates are so high. A pioneering study, How Cancer Crossed the Color Line gracefully documents how race and gender became central motifs in the birth of cancer awareness, how patterns and perceptions changed over time, and how the "war on cancer" continues to be waged along the color line.

  • Catastrophic Neurologic Disorders in the Emergency Department

    This unique text takes a comprehensive approach to the care of patients with neurologic catastrophes immediately after their entry into the emergency department. Wijdicks discusses clinical evaluations, triage, and emergency procedures in detail, and covers many other topics. For this thoroughly updated second edition, he has added eight new chapters, seven of which appear in an entirely new first section on the evaluation of presenting symptoms indicating urgency. The conversational titles of these chapters echo common requests for urgent consultation (e.g. "short of breath," "can't walk or stand," "confused and febrile"). A special feature of this section is the use of algorithms and decision trees in triage - to help the physician make a very fast and yet informed decision. The remaining two sections of the book cover the evaluation and management of evolving catastrophes in the neuraxis and catastrophic neurologic disorders due to specific causes. There is a final new chapter on forensic neurology. This practical handbook will continue to be an invaluable guide for neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, and their residents and fellows. The third volume in the author's trilogy on critical care neurology, it combines the images of a neuroradiology text with the practical advice of an emergency neurology manual without compromising academic rigor.

  • Music in the Galant Style

    Music in the Galant Style is an authoritative and readily understandable study of the core compositional style of the eighteenth century. Gjerdingen adopts a unique approach, based on a massive but little-known corpus of pedagogical workbooks used by the most influential teachers of the century, the Italian partimenti. He has brought this vital repository of compositional methods into confrontation with a set of schemata distilled from an enormous body of eighteenth-century music, much of it known only to specialists, formative of the "galant style."

  • Oxford Latin Course: Oxford Latin Reader

    This second edition of the Oxford Latin Course combines the best features of both modern and traditional methods of Latin teaching from first stages to GCSE. Completely revised and restructured in the light of a nationwide survey of Classics teachers, it provides an exciting, stimulating approach to Latin based on the reading of original texts. Parts I-III are built around a narrative detailing the life of Horace, based closely on historical sources, which helps students to develop an understanding of the times of Cicero and Augustus.

  • Research on the Management of Innovation: The Minnesota Studies

    This is a reprint of a classic work of research on innovation first published in 1989. Resulting from the Minnesota Innovation Research Program (MIRP), the book includes a revised and expanded Preface and will complement the three other books growing out of the program, all published by Oxford: The Innovation Journey (1999), Organizational Change Processes: Theory and Methods for Research (2000), and Handbook of Organizational Change and Development (coming 2001).

  • The Rehnquist Court and the Constitution

    In The Rehnquist Court and the Constitution, Tinsley Yarbrough provides a comprehensive look at today's Supreme Court Justices and their record--a study all the more valuable for the Court's mixed decisions and hard-to-categorize course. An accomplished biographer, Yarbrough offers incisive portraits of the nine who now sit on the high bench, and tellingly reviews their nomination hearings. He also explores the workings of the Court, ranging from the selection and role of the clerks to the work load (including the end-of-term "June crunch") and assignment of opinions. But the heart of the book is a systematic exploration of the Court's record in such fields as government power, economic regulation, and criminal justice. In decision after decision, the author discusses the various justices' opinions, arguments, and legal theories; he also offers his own analysis (including a sharp critique of the decision to allow the Paula Jones lawsuit to move forward). Like many writers on the Rehnquist Court, Yarbrough finds a general continuity with the past, shaded by a conservative outlook (especially in matters of criminal justice and affirmative action), but he identifies a significant departure in its rulings on economic regulation. Since 1937, he writes, the Supreme Court had generally adopted an expansive view of federal power over economic matters; the Rehnquist Court has reversed that trend. The Rehnquist Court has not launched an all-out assault on the Warren Court's precedents, as many conservatives hoped, but as Yarbrough shows it has embarked on important new departures. Thoughtful, wide-ranging, intelligently written, this book will stand as the finest study of the Rehnquist Court for years to come.

  • Cognitive Foundations of Musical Pitch

    This book addresses the central problem of music cognition: how listeners' responses move beyond mere registration of auditory events to include the organization, interpretation, and remembrance of these events in terms of their function in a musical context of pitch and rhythm. Equally important, the work offers an analysis of the relationship between the psychological organization of music and its internal structure. Combining over a decade of original research on music cognition with an overview of the available literature, the work will be of interest to cognitive and physiological psychologists, psychobiologists, musicians, music researchers, and music educators. The author provides the necessary background in experimental methodology and music theory so that no specialized knowledge is required for following her major arguments.

  • The Fourth Power: A Grand Strategy for the United States in the Twenty-First Century

    Today, even as America asserts itself globally, it lacks a grand strategy to replace "containment of communism." In this short, sharp book, Gary Hart outlines a new grand strategy, one directing America's powers to the achievement of its large purposes. Central to this strategy is the power of American ideals, what Hart calls "the fourth power." Constitutional liberties, representative government, press freedom--these and other democratic principles, attractive to peoples worldwide, constitute a resource that may prove as important to national security and the national interest in this dangerous new century as traditional military, economic and political might. A bracing vision of an America responsive to a full spectrum of global challenges, The Fourth Power calls for a deeper understanding both of the threats we face and the profound strengths at our disposal to fight them.

  • The Erotic Word: Sexuality, Spirituality, and the Bible

    Historically, the Bible has been used to drive a wedge between the spirit and the body. In this provocative book, David Carr argues that it can--and should--do just the opposite. Sexuality and spirituality, Carr contends, are intricately interwoven: when one is improverished, the other is warped. As a result, the journey toward God and the life-long engagement with our own sexual embodiment are inseparable. Humans, the Bible tells us, both male and female, were created in God's image, and eros--a fundamental longing for connection that finds abstract good in the pleasure we derive from the stimulation of the senses--is a central component of that image. The Bible, particularly the Hebrew Bible, affirms erotic passion, both eros between humans and eros between God and humans. In a sweeping examination of the sexual rules of the Bible, Carr asserts that Biblical "family values" are a far cry from anything promoted as such in contemporary politics. He concludes that passionate love--our preoccupaton therewith and pursuit thereof--is the primary human vocation, that eros is in fact the flavoring of life.

  • The Oxford Companion to Jazz

    Jazz and its colorful, expansive history resonate in this unique collection of 60 essays specially-commissioned from today's top jazz performers, writers, and scholars. Contributors include such jazz insiders as Bill Crow, Samuel A. Floyd Jr., Ted Gioia, Gene Lees, Dan Morgenstern, Gunther Schuller, Richard M. Sudhalter, and Patricia Willard. Both a reference book and an engaging read, the Companion surveys the evolution of jazz from its roots in Africa and Europe until the present. Along the way, each distinctive style and period is profiled by an expert in the field. Whether your preference is ragtime, the blues, bebop, or fusion, you will find the chief characteristics and memorable performances illuminated here with a thoroughness found in no other single-volume jazz reference. The Oxford Companion to Jazz features individual biographies of the most memorable characters of this relatively young art form. Sidney Bechet, King Oliver, Jelly Roll Morton, Louis Armstrong, Bix Beiderbecke, Bessie Smith, Duke Ellington, Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Charles Mingus, John Coltrane, and the divas of jazz song--Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, and Sarah Vaughan--come to life in thoughtful considerations of their influences, often turbulent personal lives, and signature styles. In addition, this book looks at the impact of jazz on American culture-in literature, film, television, and dance-and explores the essential instruments of jazz and their most memorable players. The Oxford Companion to Jazz will provide a quick reference source as well as a dynamic and broad overview for all lovers of jazz, from novices to aficionados.

  • Divide and Conquer: A Comparative History of Medical Specialization

    This wide-ranging book is the first to examine one of the most significant and characteristic features of modern medicine - specialization - in historical and comparative context. Based on research in three languages, it traces the origins of modern medical specialization to 1830s Paris and examines its spread to Germany, Britain, and the US, showing how it evolved from an outgrowth of academic teaching and research in the 19th century into the dominant mode of medical practice by the middle of the 20th. Taking account of the parallels and differences in national developments, the book shows the international links among the nations' medical systems as well as the independent influences of local political and social conditions in the move toward specialization. An epilogue takes the story up to the twenty-first century, where problems of specialization merge into the larger crisis of health care which affects most western nations today.

  • Laws and Lawmakers: Science, Metaphysics, and the Laws of Nature

    Laws of nature have long puzzled philosophers. What distinguishes laws from facts about the world that do not rise to the level of laws? How can laws be contingent and nevertheless necessary? In this brief, accessible study, Lange offers provocative and original answers to these questions. He argues that laws are distinguished by their necessity, which is grounded in primitive subjunctive facts (expressed by counterfactual conditionals). While recognizing that natural necessity is distinct from logical, metaphysical, and mathematical necessity, Lange explains how natural necessity constitutes a species of the same genus as those other varieties of necessity. Along the way, Lange discusses the relation between laws and objective chances, as well as such unjustly neglected topics as the completeness of the laws of physics and whether the laws of nature can change. Lange's elegant, engagingly written book is non-technical and suitable for undergraduate philosophers (and undergraduate scientists interested in the logical foundations of science). It is "must reading" for metaphysicians and philosophers of science working on laws, chance, counterfactuals, modality, or the philosophy of physics.

  • Clinical Mycology

    Within the field of infectious diseases, medical mycology has experienced significant growth over the last decade. Invasive fungal infections have been increasing in many patient populations, including: those with AIDS; transplant recipients; and the elderly. As these populations grow, so does the diversity of fungal pathogens. Paralleling this development, there have been recent launches of several new antifungal drugs and therapies. Clinical Mycology offers a comprehensive review of this discipline. Organized by types of fungi, this volume covers microbiologic, epidemiologic and demographic aspects of fungal infections as well as diagnostic, clinical, therapeutic, and preventive approaches. Special patient populations are also detailed.

  • Drummin' Men: The Heartbeat of Jazz : The Bebop Years

    In the 1930s, swing music was everywhere - on the radio, in the great hotel ballrooms, at the theatre, and in the clubs. Perhaps at no other time were drummers more central to the sound and spirits of jazz - as Jo Jones once said, 'The drummer is the key - the heartbeat of jazz.' Drummin' Men presents written portraits of several drummers from the swing era of jazz as informed by the drummers themselves, their friends, and contemporaries. It is also Burt Korall's memoir of more than 40 years in the jazz world and a deeeply personal celebration of the men and their music. Meet chick Webb, small, fragile-looking, a hunchback from childhood, whose explosive drumming style would have made him capable, as one wit expressed it, of forcing the Guy Lombardo band to swing...Gene Krupa, the showman, with syncopating, pulsating, swing style - but above all a jazz entertainer...Dave Tough, a natural musician, soulful, subtle - who lit a fire under Woody Herman's Band...and Buddy Rich, a great technician, intense, aggressive, and ever pulsating. Based on hundreds of interviews with many of the world's greatest jazzmen, Drummin' Men will intrigue and fascinate every jazz lover.

  • The Saltwater Wilderness

    This book plunges the reader into the heart of the sea. It is an elegantly-written account of one photojournalist's experience studying marine natural history and ecology. Illustrated with classic black and white photography, and annotated with references to classic marine literature, this book takes the reader from California to New Guinea, Fiji, Palau, and Tonga, to the Caribbean, to Alaska, and back again. Along the way, a quest to shed light on marine limits, symbiosis, and biogeography ties the adventures together. It will appeal to anyone who snokels, swims, scuba dives, surfs, studies marine biology, or loves the sea.

  • AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors

    For decades indispensable, the AMA Manual of Style continues to provide editorial support to the medical and scientific publishing community. Since the 1998 publication of the 9th edition, however, the world of medical publishing has rapidly modernized, and the intersection of research and publishing has become ever more complex. The 10th edition of the AMA Manual of Style brings this definitive manual into the 21st century with a broadened international perspective. In doing so, the 10th edition has expanded its electronic guidelines, with the understanding that authors now routinely submit articles through online systems and cite Web-only content. Ethical and legal issues receive increased attention, with detailed guidelines on authorship, conflicts of interest, scientific misconduct, intellectual property, and the protection of individuals' rights in scientific publication. The new edition examines research ethics and editorial indepedence and features new material on indexing and searching as well as medical nomenclature. JAMA and the Archives Journals, one of the most respected groups of medical publications in the world, have lent members of their expert staff of professional journal editors to the committee that has produced this edition. Extensively peer-reviewed, the 10th edition provides a welcome and improved standard for the growing international medical community. More than just a style manual, this 10th edition offers invaluable guidelines on how to navigate the dilemmas that authors and researchers and their institutions, medical editors and publishers, and members of the news media who cover scientific research confront in a society that has thrust these issues centre stage.

  • Our Natural History: The Lessons of Lewis and Clark

    Often referred to as America's national epic of exploration, the 28-month Lewis and Clark expedition was certainly America's greatest odyssey. Commissioned in 1804 by Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark set off on the greatest wilderness trip ever recorded. Beginning in St. Louis, they navigated up the Missouri River and through the prairies, enduring a winter with the Mandan Indians in North Dakota, reaching the summit of the Rocky Mountains and then following the Columbia River to their final destination, the Pacific Ocean. Trained in natural history and in the methods of collecting plant and animal samples, Lewis and Clark carefully and meticulously recorded the conditions of the rivers, prairies, forests, mountains, and wildlife of pre-industrial America. Now, in this new edition of Our Natural History, Daniel B. Botkin, a distinguished botanist and naturalist, re-creates the grand journey--taking us on an exciting ecological adventure back to the landscape of the great American West. In retracing their steps, Botkin reveals what this western landscape actually looked like and how much it's been changed by modern civilization and technology. With fresh insight, Botkin shows us that from the explorers' observations, we can learn much about the environment of our past, our environment today, and what our environment might be in the future. Now with a new Afterword marking the 200th anniversary of the expedition, this timely and thought-provoking book captures our imagination and stimulates our sentiment with lessons about our environment and our place within it. Our Natural History offers a stunning and rare portrait of the rugged, beautiful, disappearing wilderness of the American West.

  • Modern Problems in Classical Electrodynamics

    Designed to be a text for Jr/Sr./beginning graduate level (4th, 5th yr)and a reference for research scientists, Modern Problems in Classical Electrodynamics includes materials such as lasers and nonlinear dynamics that are missing from traditional electrodynamics books. The book begins with relativistic mechanics and field theory, in part because they lend unity and beauty to electrodynamics, and in part because relativistic concepts appear frequently in the rest of the book. Relativity is a natural part of electrodynamics. After that, the book turns to electrostatics and magnetostatics, waves, continuous media, nonlinear optics, diffraction, and radiation by moving particles. Examples and homework exercises throughout the book are taken from condensed-matter physics, particle physics, optics, and atomic physics. Many are experimentally oriented, reflecting the view that classical electrodynamics has a broad importance in modern physics that extends beyond preparing students for quantum mechanics. At the end, the book returns to basics, and discusses the fundamental problems inherent in the classical theory of electrons.

  • International Perspectives on Youth Conflict and Development

    International Perspectives on Youth Conflict and Development brings together in one volume essays discussing the social, political, and economic contexts of youth conflict across fourteen countries on seven continents. Distinguished contributors from around the world draw on research and interventions to describe young people's participation in armed conflict, fighting, and social exclusion from the time they enter the public sphere to adulthood, as defined in their local environments. Case studies include children involved in armed conflict in Mozambique, Angola, the Philippines, and Nigeria; young people exposed to post-war tensions in Bosnia, Croatia, and South Africa, youth in the streets in Brazil and Colombia; Arab and Jewish youth in the ongoing crisis in Israel; children socialized to hate, mistrust, or exclude those of other ethnic, economic, or social identities in the United States, Germany, and Korea; and young people experiencing the dramatic political and economic transition in China. Rather than focusing on character flaws and socio-cognitive deficits or other problems of individual youth, their families, or cultures, the volume examines youth conflict as a social practice embedded in local, national, and international processes. The volume aims to shift the foundation of youth conflict study from the more typical focus on maturation, behavior, and personality to a characterization of youth as participants in society. It also expands the analysis of youth development to include societal problems such as political instability, unequal access to material resources, racism, and social injustice. Offering new insights about the interdependent spheres of conflict involving young people, this groundbreaking, international compilation describes processes of a violent world rather than of violent youth.

  • Three-Dimensional Electron Microscopy of Macromolecular Assemblies: Visualization of Biological Molecules in their Native State

    Cryoelectron microscopy of biological molecules is among the hottest growth areas in biophysics and structural biology at present, and Frank is arguably the most distinguished practitioner of this art. CryoEM is likely over the next few years to take over much of the structural approaches currently requiring X-ray crystallography, because one can now get good and finely detailed images of single molecules down to as little as 200,000 MW, covering a substantial share of the molecules of greatest biomedical research interest. This book, the successor to an earlier work published in 1996 with Academic Press, is a natural companion work to our forthcoming book on electron crystallography by Robert Glaeser, with contributions by six others, including Frank. A growing number of workers will employ CryoEM for structural studies in their own research, and a large proportion of biomedical researchers will have a growing interest in understanding what the capabilities and limits of this approach are.

  • Music in Bulgaria: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture

    Designed for undergraduates with little or no background in world music, Music in Bulgaria is one of several volumes that can be used along with Thinking Musically, the main book in the Global Music Series, in any introductory world music or ethnomusicology course. Music in Bulgaria provides an overview of the cultural, historical, and political meaning of traditional Bulgarian music. It begins by exploring how Bulgaria's rural traditions affect the expression and interpretation of its music and goes on to examine how the country's social, political, and economic histories have influenced its music over many decades. The book also shows how the musical traditions of Bulgaria have been preserved despite the social changes brought about by the post-WWII era of industrialization and urbanization. It analyzes how Bulgarian music has spread throughout other cultures and how it has made its mark on new forms of popular music. Music in Bulgaria features eyewitness accounts of local performances, interviews with performers, and numerous listening examples. It is packaged with a 70-minute CD that includes examples of the music discussed in the text.

  • Intellectual Disability: A Guide for Families and Professionals

    Approximately 2.5 million people in the United States--one percent of the population--have an intellectual disability (previously referred to as mental retardation). These conditions range from genetic disorders such as Down syndrome to disabilities caused by infectious diseases and brain injury. Intellectual Disability: A Guide for Families and Professionals, by one of the country's foremost authorities on intellectual disability, is a comprehensive resource that will be of importance to anyone with a personal connection to a child or adult with a neurodevelopmental disorder. Emphasizing the humanity of persons with intellectual and related developmental disabilities, psychiatrist and pediatrician James Harris provides essential information on assessment and diagnosis of intellectual disability, treatments for specific disorders, and ways to take advantage of the wide array of services available today. The focus throughout is on the development of the person, the positive supports necessary for self-determination, and, to the extent possible, independent decision making. Harris also surveys historical attitudes toward intellectual disability, the medical community's current understanding of its causes and frequency, and the associated physical, behavioral, and psychiatric conditions (such as seizure disorder, depression, and autism) that often accompany particular types of intellectual disability. The book addresses legal, medical, mental health, and research-related issues as well as matters of spirituality, highlighting the ways in which individuals with intellectual disability can meaningfully participate in the spiritual lives of their families and their communities. Each chapter ends with a series of key points to remember, and the book concludes with a list of additional resources of further interest. Intellectual Disability is a must-read for parents and families of those with neurodevelopmental disorders, providing guidance and essential information to help their family members effectively, and to make a significant, positive difference in their lives now and in the future.

  • Stuffed Animals and Pickled Heads: The Culture of Natural History Museums

    The natural history museum is a place where the line between "high" and "low" culture effectively vanishes--where our awe of nature, our taste for the bizarre, and our thirst for knowledge all blend happily together. But as Stephen Asma shows in Stuffed Animals and Pickled Heads, there is more going on in these great institutions than just smart fun. Asma takes us on a wide-ranging tour of natural history museums in New York and Chicago, London and Paris, interviewing curators, scientists, and exhibit designers, and providing a wealth of fascinating observations. We learn how the first museums were little more than high-toned side shows, with such garish exhibits as the pickled head of Catherine the Great's lover. In contrast, today's museums are hot-beds of serious science, funding major research in such fields as anthropology and archaeology. "Rich in detail, lucid explanation, telling anecdotes, and fascinating characters.... Asma has rendered a fascinating and credible account of how natural history museums are conceived and presented. It's the kind of book that will not only engage a wide and diverse readership, but it should, best of all, send them flocking to see how we look at nature and ourselves in those fabulous legacies of the curiosity cabinet."--The Boston Herald.

  • Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness: A Casebook

    Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad's fictional account of a journey up the Congo river in 1890, raises important questions about colonialism and narrative theory. This casebook contains materials relevant to a deeper understanding of the origins and reception of this controversial text, including Conrad's own story 'An Outpost of Progress', together with a little-known memoir by one of Conrad's oldest English friends, a brief history of the Congo Free State by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and a parody of Conrad by Max Beerbohm. A wide range of theoretical approaches are also represented, examining Conrad's text in terms of cultural, historical, textual, stylistic, narratological, post-colonial, feminist, and reader-response criticism. The volume concludes with an interview in which Conrad compares his adventures on the Congo with Mark Twain's experiences as a Mississippi pilot.

  • Nature Loves to Hide: Quantum Physics and Reality, a Western Perspective

    In "Nature Loves to Hide", physicist Shimon Malin takes readers on a fascinating tour of quantum theory - one that turns to Western philosophical thought to clarify this strange yet inescapable description of the nature of reality. Malin translates quantum mechanics into plain English, explaining its origins and workings against the backdrop of the famous debate between Niels Bohr and the skeptical Albert Einstein. Then he moves on to build a philosophical framework that can account for the quantum nature of reality. He draws out the linkage between the concepts of Neoplatonism and the more recent process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead. Writing with broad humanistic insight and deep knowledge of science, and using delightful conversation with fictional astronauts Peter and Julie to explain more difficult concepts, Shimon Malin offers a profound new understanding of the nature of reality - one that shows a deep continuity with aspects of our Western philosophical tradition going back 2,500 years, and that feels more deeply satisfying, and truer, than the clockwork universe of Newton.

  • Emergency Department Treatment of the Psychiatric Patient: Policy Issues and Legal Requirements

    Many hospital emergency departments are overcrowded and short-staffed, with a limited number of hospital beds. It is increasingly hard for emergency departments and their staff to provide the necessary level of care for medical patients. Caring for people with psychiatric disabilities raises different issues and calls on different skills. In Emergency Department Treatment of the Psychiatric Patient, Dr Stefan uses research, surveys and statutory and litigation materials to examine problems with emergency department care for clients with psychiatric disorders. She relies on interviews with emergency department nurses, doctors and psychiatrists, as well as surveys of people with psychiatric disabilities to present the perspectives of both the individuals seeking treatment, and those providing it. This eye-opening book explores the structural pressures on emergency departments and identifies the burdens and conflicts that undermine their efforts to provide compassionate care to people in psychiatric crisis. In addition to presenting a new analysis of the source of these problems, Dr Stefan also suggests an array of alternatives to emergency department treatment for people in psychiatric crisis. Moreover, the author proposes standards for treatment of these individuals when they do inevitably end up in a hospital emergency department. Emergency Department Treatment of the Psychiatric Patient presents a thoughtful and thorough analysis of the difficulties faced by people with psychiatric disabilities when seeking emergency medical care. It is essential reading for anyone working in a hospital emergency department, as well as health care policy makers, and advocates and lawyers for people with psychiatric disabilities.

  • Startup Factories: High Performance Management, Job Quality and Regional Advantage

    This book gives the findings of a concise study of start-up factories in the United States by Japanese companies. This in-depth look at this increased phenomenon discusses not only the quality of jobs these factories produce, but it also expands to reveal their keys to success in achieving a strong competitive advantage. Finally, this volume gives the four inter-related strategies ( high performance management strategy, the economics of efficient wages, the quality of technology plants and regional economic development) that make for successful, high performance factories.

  • The Hippocratic Oath and the Ethics of Medicine

    This engaging book examines what the Hippocratic Oath meant to Greek physicians 2400 years ago and reflects on its relevance to medical ethics today. Drawing on the writings of ancient physicians, Greek playwrights, and modern scholars, each chapter explores one of its passages and concludes with a modern case discussion. The Oath proposes principles governing the relationship between the physician and society and patients. It rules out the use of poison and a hazardous abortive technique. It defines integrity and discretion in physicians' speech. The ancient Greek medical works written during the same period as the Oath reveal that Greek physicians understood that they had a duty to avoid medical errors and learn from bad outcomes. These works showed how and why to tell patients about their diseases and dire prognoses in order to develop a partnership for healing and to build the credibility of the profession. Miles uses these writings to illuminate the meaning of the Oath in its day and in so doing shows how and why it remains a valuable guide to the ethical practice of medicine. This is a book for anyone who loves medicine and is concerned about the ethics and history of this profession.

  • Learning Piano: Includes CD

    Learning Piano: Piece by Piece is designed for non-music majors who want to learn piano 'for the fun of it'. Briefer, more user-friendly, and less imposing than traditional texts for group piano courses, this text will enable students to achieve basic, functional keyboard skills through the study of fresh and appealing, easy-to-play arrangements of repertoire - folk, pop, rock, blues, and classical (including 20th-century pieces)

  • The Middle East: A Cultural Psychology

    For over a decade the Middle East has monopolized news headlines in the West. Journalists and commentators regularly speculate that the region's turmoil may stem from the psychological momentum of its cultural traditions or of a "tribal" or "fatalistic" mentality. Yet few studies of the region's cultural psychology have provided a critical synthesis of psychological research on Middle Eastern societies. Drawing on autobiographies, literary works, ethnographic accounts, and life-history interviews, The Middle East: A Cultural Psychology offers the first comprehensive summary of psychological writings on the region, covering works by psychologists, anthropologists, and sociologists written in English, Arabic, and French. Rejecting stereotypic descriptions of the "Arab mind" or "Muslim mentality," Gary Gregg adopts a life-span development framework, examining influences on development in the context of recent work in cultural psychology, and compares Middle Eastern patterns less with Western middle class norms than with those described for the region's neighbors: Hindu India, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Mediterranean shore of Europe. The psychological writings overwhelmingly suggest that the region's strife stems much less from a stubborn adherence to tradition and resistance to modernity than from widespread frustration with broken promises of modernization - with the slow and halting pace of economic progress and democratization. A sophisticated account of the Middle East's cultural psychology, this book provides students, researchers, policy-makers, and all those interested in the culture and psychology of the region with invaluable insight into the lives, families, and social relationships of Middle Easterners as they struggle to reconcile the lure of Westernized life-styles with traditional values.

  • Law in Public Health Practice

    Continually changing health threats, technologies, science, and demographics require that public health professionals have an understanding of law sufficient to address complex new problems as they come into being. Law in Public Health Practice, Second Edition provides a thorough review of the legal basis and authorities for the core elements of public health practice and solid discussions of existing and emerging high-priority areas where law and public health intersect. As in the previous edition, each chapter is authored jointly by experts in law and public health. This new edition features three completely new chapters, with several others thoroughly revised and updated. New chapters address such topics as the statutory bases for US public health systems and practice, the judiciary role in public health, and chronic disease prevention and control. The chapter on public health emergencies has also been fully revised and rewritten to take into account both the SARS epidemic of 2003 and the events of the Autumn of 2001. The chapter discusses subsequent changes in federal and state laws involving consequence management of public health emergencies. Other fully revised chapters include those on genomics, injury prevention, identifiable health information, and ethics in the practice of public health. The book begins with a section on the legal basis for public health practice, including foundations and structure of the law, discussions of the judiciary, ethics and practice of public health, and criminal law and international considerations. The second section focuses on core public health applications and the law, and includes chapters on legal counsel for public health practitioners, legal authorities for interventions in public health emergencies, and considerations for special populations. The third section discusses the law in controlling and preventing diseases, injuries, and disabilities. This section includes chapters on genomics, vaccinations, foodborne illness, STDs, reproductive health, chronic disease control, tobacco use, and occupational and environmental health. All chapters take a practical approach and are written in an accessible, user-friendly fashion. This is an excellent resource for a wide readership of public health practitioners, lawyers, and healthcare providers, as well as for educators and students of law and public health.

  • Applied Longitudinal Data Analysis: Modeling Change and Event Occurrence

    Change is constant in everyday life. Infants crawl and then walk, children learn to read and write, teenagers mature in myriad ways, the elderly become frail and forgetful. In addition to these natural changes, targeted interventions may cause change: cholesterol levels may decline as a result of a new medication, exam grades may rise following completion of a coaching class. By measuring and charting changes like these - both naturalistic and experimentally induced - researchers uncover the temporal nature of development. The investigation of change has fascinated empirical researchers for generations, and to do it well, they must have longitudinal data. Applied Longitudinal Data Analysis is a much-needed professional book that will instruct readers in the many new methodologies now at their disposal to make the best use of longitudinal data, including both individual growth modelling and survival analysis. Throughout the chapters, the authors employ many cases and examples from a variety of disciplines, covering multilevel models, curvilinear and discontinuous change, in addition to discrete-time hazard models, continuous-time event occurrence, and Cox regression models. Applied Longitudinal Data Analysis is a unique contribution to the literature on research methods and will be useful to a wide range of behavioural and social science researchers.

  • How International Law Works: A Rational Choice Theory

    International relations are full of appeals to and claims about international law. From intellectual property, to human rights, to environment, to investment, to health and safety, issues that have traditionally been almost exclusively within the purview of domestic lawmakers are now the subject of international legal obligations. Yet despite the importance of international law, there are no well-developed set of theories on the ways in which international law impacts domestic decision makers. Filling a conspicuous gap in the legal literature, Andrew T. Guzman's How International Law Works develops a coherent theory of international law and applies that theory to the primary sources of law, treaties, customary international law, and soft law. Starting where most non-specialists start, Guzman looks at how a legal system without enforcement tools can succeed. If international law is not enforced through coercive tools, how is it enforced at all? And why would states comply with it? Supporting the traditional international law view that international law matters and affects state behavior, Guzman offers a theory of international law that assumes states behave rationally and selfishly. The author argues that at the heart of compliance with international law is the basic fact that a failure to live up to legal obligations today will impact a country's ability to extract concessions for legal promises in the future. Under this reputational model, the violation of international law generates a costly loss of reputation and the threat of this loss provides an incentive to comply. A reputational theory suggests when and where international law is likely to be effective and ways to maximize its ability to advance the goal of international cooperation. Understanding international law in a world of rational states helps us to understand when we can look to international law to resolve problems, and when we must accept that we live in an anarchic world and must leave some issues to politics.

  • The Oxford Guide to the United States Government

    The Oxford Guide to the United States Government is the ultimate resource for authoritative information on the U.S. Presidency, Congress, and Supreme Court. Compiled by three top scholars, its pages brim with the key figures, events, and structures that have animated U.S. government for more than 200 years. In addition to coverage of the 2000 Presidential race and election, this Guide features biographies of all the Presidents, Vice Presidents, and Supreme Court Justices, as well as notable members of Congress, including current leadership; historical commentary on past elections, major Presidential decisions, international and domestic programs, and the key advisors and agencies of the executive branch; in-depth analysis of Congressional leadership and committees, agencies and staff, and historic legislation; and detailed discussions of 100 landmark Supreme Court cases and the major issues facing the Court today. In addition to entries that define legal terms and phrases and others that elaborate on the wide array of government traditions, this invaluable book includes extensive back matter, including tables of Presidential election results; lists of Presidents, Vice Presidents, Congresses, and Supreme Court Justices with dates of service; lists of Presidential museums, libraries, and historic sites; relevant websites; and information on visiting the White House, the Capitol, and Supreme Court buildings. A one-stop, comprehensive guide that will assist students, educators, and anyone curious about the inner workings of government, The Oxford Guide to the United States Government will be a valued addition to any home library.

  • Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Postconcussion Syndrome: The New Evidence Base for Diagnosis and Treatment

    This is the first neuropsychology book to translate exciting findings from the recent explosion of research on sport-related concussion to the broader context of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) and post-concussive syndrome (PCS) in the general population. Traumatic brain injuries constitute a major global public health problem, but until now MTBIs, which constitute up to 90 percent of all treated TBIs, have been difficult to evaluate and manage clinically because of the absence of a viable model. This book provides a welcome evidence base for all clinicians involved in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of MTBI. Each section of the book ends with a helpful summary of the 'Top 10' conclusions. The book includes a Continuing Education (CE) component administered by the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology.

  • With Pleasure: Thoughts on the Nature of Human Sexuality

    Challenging everything from the mandates of the Catholic Church to the hotly debated ethics of pornography, and from the controversy surrounding gay rights to issues of gender and feminism, With Pleasure explores a new theory of human sexuality that ignites every hot topic in the public domain. What role, authors Paul Abramson and Steven Pinkerton ask, does sexual pleasure play in our lives? Is the pursuit of sexual enjoyment in our blood? Our brains? Our very nature? Regardless of the source, it can be agreed that the joys of sex are widely appreciated. Why, then, is pleasure so often overlooked in discussions of sexual behaviour, and why do cultural, historical, and religious treatises so often fail to emphasise, or outright ignore, this obvious aspect of human sexuality? Responding to these and many other questions about our most private affairs, With Pleasure provides a profoundly original challenge to the cherished truisms of human sexuality. Abramson and Pinkerton proclaim the paramount importance of pleasure, while at the same time overthrowing traditional ideas about gender, pornography, contraception, homosexuality, abortion, and much more. Supported by rigorous research and co-written by one of the foremost authorities on sex, With Pleasure argues that human sexuality cannot be understood if its significance is limited to reproduction alone. The authors posit that in humans reproduction itself occurs as a byproduct of pleasure--not the other way around--and that it is the strong drive for pleasure that makes people overcome many obstacles--and even life-threatening dangers such as AIDS--to have sex. Ranging from discussions about the church to current debates about pornography, and from evolutionary theory to questions about the future of sex and pleasure, Abramson and Pinkerton argue persuasively that the pleasurability of sex cannot be restricted to purely reproductive behaviour. With Pleasure advances a startling and original new theory about human sexuality, one which the authors believe will replace all existing notions about sex. The book, standing in direct and deliberate opposition to traditions that try to confine sexuality to procreation, is sure to ignite a firestorm of controversy.

  • Conquest By Law: How The Discovery Of America Dispossessed Indigenous Peoples Of Their Land

    In 1823, Chief Justice John Marshall handed down a Supreme Court decision of monumental importance in defining the rights of indigenous peoples throughout the English-speaking world. At the heart of the decision for Johnson v. M'Intosh was a "discovery doctrine" that gave rights of ownership to the European sovereigns who "discovered" the land and converted the indigenous owners into tenants. Though its meaning and intention has been fiercely disputed, more than 175 years later, this doctrine remains the law of the land. In 1991, while investigating the discovery doctrine's historical origins Lindsay Robertson made a startling find; in the basement of a Pennsylvania furniture-maker, he discovered a trunk with the complete corporate records of the Illinois and Wabash Land Companies, the plaintiffs in Johnson v. M'Intosh. Conquest by Law provides, for the first time, the complete and troubling account of the European "discovery" of the Americas. This is a gripping tale of political collusion, detailing how a spurious claim gave rise to a doctrine--intended to be of limited application--which itself gave rise to a massive displacement of persons and the creation of a law that governs indigenous people and their lands to this day.

  • Jazz Anecdotes: Second Time around

    This second edition will feature new anecdotes involving Benny Goodman, Billy Taylor, Jackie Gleason, Duke Ellington, Wynton Marsalis and many more as well as a new foreword by Crow. "Read this somewhere where you're not afraid to be seen laughing out loud....Everyone should be able to find something to like in this rich collection"--Library Journal "A scintillating omnium gathering of jazz talk." --Washington Post "Guarantees up to a thousand laughs...recommended without reservation."--Los Angeles Times "The intense sociological hothouse that was the jazz and commercial music world has cooled down greatly over the years, but it's important to have books like this to remind us how exciting and invigorating those days were....Don't let it slip by."--Allegro

  • Steel Drivin' Man: John Henry: the Untold Story of an American Legend

    The ballad "John Henry" is the most recorded folk song in American history and John Henry--the mighty railroad man who could blast through rock faster than a steam drill--is a towering figure in our culture. But for over a century, no one knew who the original John Henry was--or even if there was a real John Henry. In Steel Drivin' Man, Scott Reynolds Nelson recounts the true story of the man behind the iconic American hero, telling the poignant tale of a young Virginia convict who died working on one of the most dangerous enterprises of the time, the first rail route through the Appalachian Mountains. Using census data, penitentiary reports, and railroad company reports, Nelson reveals how John Henry, victimized by Virginia's notorious Black Codes, was shipped to the infamous Richmond Penitentiary to become prisoner number 497, and was forced to labor on the mile-long Lewis Tunnel for the C&O railroad. Nelson even confirms the legendary contest between John Henry and the steam drill (there was indeed a steam drill used to dig the Lewis Tunnel and the convicts in fact drilled faster). Equally important, Nelson masterfully captures the life of the ballad of John Henry, tracing the song's evolution from the first printed score by blues legend W. C. Handy, to Carl Sandburg's use of the ballad to become the first "folk singer," to the upbeat version by Tennessee Ernie Ford. We see how the American Communist Party appropriated the image of John Henry as the idealized American worker, and even how John Henry became the precursor of such comic book super heroes as Superman or Captain America. Attractively illustrated with numerous images, Steel Drivin' Man offers a marvelous portrait of a beloved folk song--and a true American legend.

  • The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life

    This magisterial work is the first comprehensive study of the ethics of killing, where the moral status of the individual killed is uncertain. Drawing on philosophical notions of personal identity and the immorality of killing, McMahan looks carefully at a host of practical issues, including abortion, infanticide, the killing of animals, assisted suicide, and euthanasia.

  • Field Epidemiology

    This book is the definitive guide to field epidemiology - the application of epidemiologic methods to unexpected health problems (e.g. bioterrorist attacks, natural disasters, industrial accidents) where rapid, on-site investigation is necessary. The third edition includes new chapters on environmental investigations and immunization strategies and evaluation. Existing chapters on bioterrorism, surveillance, and operations have been completely rewritten. The rest of the chapters have been revised and updated with new case studies and examples.

  • What Did Jesus Mean?: Explaining the Sermon on the Mount and the Parables in Simple and Universal Human Concepts

    In this highly interdisciplinary work, linguist Anna Wierzbicka casts new light on the words of Jesus by taking her well-known semantic theory of "universal human concepts"- concepts which are intuitively understandable and self-explanatory across languages-and bringing it to bear on Jesus' parables and the Sermon on the Mount. Her approach results in strikingly novel interpretations of the Gospels. Written in dialogue with other biblical commentators, What Did Jesus Mean? is scholarly, rigorous, and yet accessible.

  • Clinical Infectious Diseases: A Practical Approach

    Until now, those in need of information on infectious diseases had to choose between encyclopedic reference texts or the infectious diseases sections in standard textbooks in internal medicine. Now there is a better alternative-Clinical Infectious Diseases fills the long-standing need for a practical yet comprehensive work that offers easy, convenient access to the topic. Of interest to internists, infectious disease specialists, and residents in training, the book is structured to give the reader essential information about the etiology and pathogenesis of various infectious diseases, and focuses on the clinical issues of managing, diagnosing, and treating patients with all types of infection. The editors and contributors are internationally known and recognized experts, and aim to validate the increasingly universal approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of infections worldwide. Emphasizing the clinical presentation of the patient by organ-system, diagnostic considerations including geographic, anatomic and microbiologic concerns, are addressed in detail. Diagnostic algorithms are provided, and specific choices of antimicrobial therapy are discussed and compiled in a user-friendly tabular format. Preventive measures for different types of infections are also addressed. Sections devoted to infections in special patient/risk groups, such as the post operative patient, the patient with immunodeficiency, the trauma patient, and the burn patient are included, as well as coverage of infections of travelers to tropical countries, and patients who have been bitten or scratched by animals or insects. A detailed presentation on HIV infection includes discussions of epidemiology, pathogenesis, immunology, clinical manifestations and antiviral treatment, as well as management of opportunistic infections.

  • What the Doctor Didn't Say: The Hidden Truth About Medical Research

    Most people know precious little about the risks and benefits of participating in a "clinical trial" - a medical research study involving some innovative treatment for a medical problem. Yet millions of people each year participate anyway. What the Doctor Didn't Say explains the reality: that our current system intentionally hides much of the information people need to make the right choice about whether to participate. Witness the following scenarios: -Hundreds of patients with colon cancer undergo a new form of keyhole surgery at leading cancer centers - never being told that 85% of colorectal surgeons, worried that it increases the risk of the cancer returning, would not themselves undergo that procedure -Tens of thousands of women at high risk of developing breast cancer are asked to participate in a major research study. They are told about the option of having both breasts surgically removed - but not told about the option of taking a standard osteoporosis pill that might cut the risk of getting breast cancer by one half or more What the Doctor Didn't Say, written by two prominent experts in the field, is the first book to reveal the secrets that many in the research establishment have fought long and hard to keep from patients. It shows why options not commonly known - including getting a new treatment outside of a research study - can often be the best choice. It explains how patients can make good decisions even if there is only limited information about a treatment's effect. And it does this through the eye-opening of what is happening daily to thousands of people. Day after day, we are learning how little we know about what really works. Headlines regularly announce that a previously unquestioned treatment - hormane replacement therapy, drugs such as Vioxx or Celebrex - may now be much riskier than we thought. The latest in a surge of recent books criticising the medical establishment (but the first to look at clinical trials specifically), What the Doctor Didn't Tell You helps to empower patients to survive in a world of medical uncertainty, and makes positive recommendations for systemic reform.

  • The Art of Performance

    Heinrich Schenker's The Art of Performance shows this great music theorist in a new light. While his theoretical writings helped transform music theory in the twentieth century, this book draws on his experience as a musician and teacher to propose a sharp reevaluation of how musical compositions are realized in performance. Filled with concrete examples and numerous suggestions, the book will interest both music theorists and practicing performers. Schenker's approach is based on his argument that much of contemporary performance practice is rooted in the nineteenth-century cult of the virtuoso, which has resulted in an overemphasis on technical display. To counter this, he proposes specific ways to reconnect the composer's intentions and the musician's performance. Schenker begins by showing how performers can benefit from understanding the laws of composition. He demonstrates how a literal interpretation of the composer's indications can be self-defeating, and he provides a lively discussion of piano technique, including suggestions for pedal, sound color, orchestral effects, and balance. He devotes separate chapters to non-legato, legato, fingering, dynamics, tempo, and rests. In addition to the examples for pianists, Schenker covers a number of topics, such as bowing technique, that will prove invaluable for other instrumentalists and for conductors. The book concludes with an aphoristic and sometimes lyrical chapter on practicing. After Schenker's death, his student Oswald Jonas prepared the text for publication from Schenker's notes, eventually leaving the manuscript to his stepdaughter, Irene Schreier Scott, who entrusted the work of organizing and editing the disparate material to Jonas's friend and student Heribert Esser. She later translated it into English. This edition is the first publication in any language of this remarkable work.

  • Transitional Justice

    At the century's end, societies all over the world are throwing off the yoke of authoritarian rule and beginning to build democracies. At any such time of radical change, the question arises: should a society punish its ancien regime or let bygones be bygones? Transitional Justice takes this question to a new level with an interdisciplinary approach that challenges the very terms of the contemporary debate. Ruti Teitel explores the recurring dilemma of how regimes should respond to evil rule, arguing against the prevailing view favoring punishment, yet contending that the law nevertheless plays a profound role in periods of radical change. Pursuing a comparative and historical approach, she presents a compelling analysis of constitutional, legislative, and administrative responses to injustice following political upheaval. She proposes a new normative conception of justice--one that is highly politicized--offering glimmerings of the rule of law that, in her view, have become symbols of liberal transition. Its challenge to the prevailing assumptions about transitional periods makes this timely and provocative book essential reading for policymakers and scholars of revolution and new democracies.

  • How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics

    In How to Kill a Dragon Calvert Watkins follows the continuum of poetic formulae in Indo-European languages, from Old Hittite to medieval Irish. He uses the comparative method to reconstruct traditional poetic formulae of considerable complexity that stretch as far back as the original common language. Thus, Watkins reveals the antiquity and tenacity of the Indo- European poetic tradition. Watkins begins this study with an introduction to the field of comparative Indo-European poetics; he explores the Saussurian notions of synchrony and diachrony, and locates the various Indo-European traditions and ideologies of the spoken word. Further, his overview presents case studies on the forms of verbal art, with selected texts drawn from Indic, Iranian, Greek, Latin, Hittite, Armenian, Celtic, and Germanic languages. In the remainder of the book, Watkins examines in detail the structure of the dragon/serpent- slaying myths, which recur in various guises throughout the Indo-European poetic tradition. He finds the "signature" formula for the myth--the divine hero who slays the serpent or overcomes adversaries--occurs in the same linguistic form in a wide range of sources and over millennia, including Old and Middle Iranian holy books, Greek epic, Celtic and Germanic sagas, down to Armenian oral folk epic of the last century. Watkins argues that this formula is the vehicle for the central theme of a proto-text, and a central part of the symbolic culture of speakers of the Proto-Indo-European language: the relation of humans to their universe, the values and expectations of their society. Therefore, he further argues, poetry was a social necessity for Indo- European society, where the poet could confer on patrons what they and their culture valued above all else: "imperishable fame."

  • Corning and the Craft of Innovation

    For 150 years, Corning Incorporated has repeatedly succeeded in their quest to create new products for an ever-changing marketplace. Corning and the Craft of Innovation is the story of the extraordinary research and development strategy that propelled this company to its leadership position in leading-edge technologies for the new world economy. Since its founding in the mid-nineteenth century, Corning has placed a premium on research and development in tandem with an unending spirit of innovation. Corning's innovations made possible such essential items as light bulbs, television, Pyrex, catalytic converters for cars, and high-speed telecommunications through fiber optics. Most impressive is Corning's evolution into a highly innovative producer of specialty materials. In its early days, Corning developed specialty glass for use in railroad signal lenses that had to withstand the rigors of high and low temperatures; and developed its high speed Ribbon Machine - still used today - to produce glass envelopes for light bulbs more quickly and efficiently than anyone else. Today Corning leads the world in fibre optics and is a premier provider of cable and photonic products. In 1999 Wired magazine nominated Corning for its coveted Wired Index, confirming Corning's astonishing staying power as a leading-edge company. Corning and the Craft of Innovation examines how Corning fostered a culture of innovation while showing extraordinary patience in backing long-term projects. The book illustrates how a pattern of deliberate, regular, and profitable innovation begun 150 years ago has put Corning at the vanguard of leading-edge technologies for the fastest-growing markets of the global marketplace. It will be essential reading for anyone interested in strategic management, innovation, science and technology or knowledge management.

  • Letters of Credit and Bank Guarantees under International Trade Law

    Letters of credit and bank guarantees are the most important financial instruments in international exchange. Matti S. Kurkela, a leading expert in the field, presents an advanced, extensive study and guide to letters of credit. The author analyzes the material rules and principles applicable to them; conflict of laws as well as law merchant applied regardless of place of operation or nationality of the parties involved. Letters of Credit and Bank Guarantees under International Trade Law is the only true guide whose focus is on international law and choice of applicable law, with comparisons of the UCP, the UCC and selected national laws. Bank attorneys, international bankers, commercial bankers, international trade and finance attorneys in law firms, in-house counsel, financial institutions, and academia will find this a clearly written, invaluable guide to the latest rules, case law and practice relating to these financial instruments. The new, expanded Second Edition includes: BL Analysis and comparison of commercial and standby credits, bank guarantees and bonds in use in international exchange BL Introduction to the various sets of rules in use in international operations and banking BL Changes made to the UCC Article 5 and UCP 600 BL New development and landmark decisions and case law since the publishing of the first edition BL Guidance to and analysis of inter bank relationship, indemnity agreements and reference to sample documentation, and numerous sample clauses BL Reference to statutory laws of lcs in various countries

  • Mental Retardation and Developmental Delay: Genetic and Epigenetic Factors

    Recent advances in neuroscience and genetics have greatly expanded our understanding of the brain and of the etiological factors involved in developmental delay and mental retardation. At the same time, the human genome project has yielded a wealth of information on DNA sequencing, regulation of gene expression, epigenetics, and functional aspects of the genome, which newly propels investigation into the pathogenesis of mental retardation. This book makes readily available current knowledge on the subject and applies it to clinical medicine, providing information essential to neurologists, geneticists, physicians and pediatricians as they search for the causes of mental handicap in their patients. Introductory chapters cover normal and abnormal brain structure, neurogenesis, neuronal proliferation, and signal transduction. Latter chapters delve into discussions of both the environmental factors that may lead to neurocognitive deficits and the cytogenetic, biochemical and molecular defects specifically associated with mental retardation. One chapter reviews gene involvement in non-syndromic mental retardation, autism, and language deficits, as well as multifactorial and genetically complex inheritance. The text concludes with a clinically practical discussion of carrier detection, presymptomatic diagnosis, and treatment of various genetic diseases through enzyme therapy, substrate deprivation, and the use of hemapoietic stem cells.

  • The Changing Face of Anti-Semitism: From Ancient Times to the Present Day

    For thirty years the director of the Wiener Library in London, the leading institute for the study of anti-Semitism, Walter Laqueur here offers both a comprehensive history of anti-Semitism as well as an illuminating look at the newest wave of this phenomenon. Laqueur begins with an invaluable historical account of this pernicious problem, tracing the evolution from a predominantly religious anti-Semitism--stretching back to the middle ages--to a racial anti-Semitism that developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The author then uses this historical account as backdrop to a brilliant analysis of the newest species of anti-Semitism, explaining its origins and rationale, how it manifests itself, in what ways and why it is different from anti-Semitism in past ages, and what forms it may take in the future. The book reveals that what was historically a preoccupation of Christian and right-wing movements has become in our time even more frequent among Muslims and left-wing groups. Moreover, Laqueur argues that we can't simply equate this new anti-Semitism with anti-Zionism and write it off as merely anti-Israel sentiments. National and religious minority groups have been systematically persecuted from Indonesia, to Bangladesh, Rwanda, and beyond, but their fate has not generated much indignation in Europe and America. If Israel alone is singled out for heated condemnation, is the root of this reaction simply anti-Zionism or is it anti-Semitism? Here is both a summing up of the entire trajectory of anti-Semitism--the first comprehensive history of its kind--and an exploration of the new wave of anti-Semitism that will be of interest to all concerned about the future of Jews, Judaism, and Israel.

  • The Provenance of Pure Reason: Essays in the Philosophy of Mathematics and Its History

    William Tait is one of the most distinguished philosophers of mathematics of the last fifty years. This volume collects his most important published philosophical papers from the 1980's to the present. The articles cover a wide range of issues in the foundations and philosophy of mathematics, including some on historical figures ranging from Plato to Godel. Tait's main contributions were initially in proof theory and constructive mathematics, later moving on to more philosophical subjects including finitism and skepticism about mathematics. This collection, presented as a whole, reveals the underlying unity of Tait's work. The volume includes an introduction in which Tait reflects more generally on the evolution of his point of view, as well as an appendix and added endnotes in which he gives some interesting background to the original essays. This is an important collection of the work of one of the most eminent philosophers of mathematics in this generation.

  • The Old Scofield Study Bible: King James Version, Black Bonded Leather, Standard Edition

    Here's a full-featured study Bible at an amazing price. Oxford is proud to offer this edition, which contains reflections on the Word of God that have guided believers for nearly nine decades. This treasured volume has been digitally reset to provide a more readable typeface without altering its pagination. It also features a protective two-piece box.

    * Thumb-indexed.
    * Authorized King James Version text.
    * Concordance.
    * Clear, readeable typeface.
    * Subject chain references.
    * Larger trim size (6-1/2 x 9")
    * Same-page text helps.
    * Complete Scofield(R) references.
    * Subheadings.
    * Revised marginal renderings.
    * Comprehensive index.
    * Introduction to each book of the Bible.
    * Subject index.
    * English equivalents for Hebrew dates.
    * 16 pages of full color Oxford Bible Maps, money, weights and measures, with index.
    * Chronologies.

  • Words of a Century: The Top 100 American Speeches, 1900-1999

    This is an anthology of the top 100 American speeches of the twentieth century, as determined in the nationwide survey of communication scholars conducted at the end of 1999. Respondents were asked to judge speeches on two main criteria: rhetorical artistry and historical impact. The survey received considerable press coverage, and the website that houses the survey results gets hundreds of hits weekly. The major attraction of the book for an academic/higher education market - full, accurate texts of all 100 of the top speeches of the 20th century - should make it at least equally appealing for the trade market. It should remain the authoritative volume of 20th century speeches well into the 21st century.

  • Death-Devoted Heart: Sex and the Sacred in Wagner's Tristan and Isolde

    A tale of forbidden love and inevitable death, the medieval legend of Tristan and Isolde recounts the story of two lovers unknowingly drinking a magic potion and ultimately dying in one another's arms. Critics have lauded Wagner's Tristan und Isolde for the originality and subtlety of the music, but have often viewed the drama as a "mere trifle," about Wagner's own forbidden affair with Matilde Wesendonk, the wife of a banker who supported him during his exile in Switzerland. In Death-Devoted Heart Scruton aims to vindicate the stature of the drama, presenting it as more than just a sublimation of the composer's love for Wesendonck or a wistful romantic dream. Scruton argues that Tristan und Isolde has profound religious meaning, as relevant today as it was to Wagner's contemporaries. Both philosophical and musicological, Scruton's analysis touches on the nature of tragedy, the significance of ritual sacrifice, and the meaning of redemption. Scruton provides a guide to the drama while offering insight into the nature of erotic love and the peculiar place of the erotic in our culture.

  • Voices from the Edge: Narratives About the Americans with Disabilities Act

    Fear, rage, courage, discrimination. These are facts of everyday life for many Americans with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), has made working, traveling, and communicating easier for many individuals. But has this significant piece of civil rights legislation helped those with disabilities become fully accepted members of society? How does an individual deal with discriminatory situations that the law cannot, does not, or will not cover? What is life like in post-ADA America? The stories in this collection give readers a chance to visualize and perhaps resolve these questions for themselves. Using the techniques of both fiction and creative non-fiction, the contributors bring to life the everyday problems that people with disabilities face. Rather than analyzing the law, the writers dramatize the complex set of issues underlying the ADA as it is practiced and interpreted around the country: at a small Southern college, in the Library of Congress, on a New York City sidewalk. The stories from these local battlegrounds form a unique portrait of a continuing struggle. Ruth O'Brien's legal commentary on the Americans with Disabilities Act supplements these narratives. Organized analytically to reflect the ADA's main provisions, her commentary draws out and responds to the legal issues raised in each contributor's narrative. Discussing relevant Supreme Court and federal cases, O'Brien addresses key legal questions such as: What recourse do individuals have when enforcement of the law is ambiguous or virtually nonexistent? What is a disability? How will its changing definition affect individuals' lives-as well as their legal actions-in the future? Voices from the Edge seeks to challenge the mindset of those who would deny equal protection to the disabled, while providing informative analysis of the intent and application of the ADA for those who wish to learn more about disability rights. Giving voice to many types of discrimination the disabled face while illustrating the personal stakes underlying legal disputes over the ADA, this collection offers unparalleled insight into the lives behind the law.

  • The New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised Standard Version

    The premier study Bible used by scholars, pastors, undergraduate and graduate students, The New Oxford Annotated Bible offers a vast range of information, including extensive notes by experts in their fields; in-text maps, charts, and diagrams; supplementary essays on translation, biblical interpretation, cultural and historical background, and other general topics. Extensively revised--half of the material is brand new--featuring a new design to enhance readability, and brand-new color maps, the Annotated Fourth Edition adds to the established reputation of this essential biblical studies resource. Many new and revised maps, charts, and diagrams further clarify information found in the Scripture text. In addition, section introductions have been expanded and the book introductions present their information in a standard format so that students can find what they need to know. Of course, the Fourth Edition retains the features prized by students, including single column annotations at the foot of the pages, in-text charts, and maps, a page number-keyed index of all the study materials in the volume, and Oxford's renowned Bible maps. This timely edition maintains and extends the excellence the Annotated's users have come to expect, bringing still more insights, information, and perspectives to bear upon the understanding of the biblical text. BL The renowned New Revised Standard Version Bible translation, the scholarly standard for study of the Bible BL Wholly revised, and greatly expanded book introductions and annotations. BL Annotations in a single column across the page bottom, paragraphed according to their boldface topical headings. BL In-text background essays on the major divisions of the biblical text. BL Essays on the history of the formation of the biblical canon for Jews and various Christian churches. BL More detailed explanations of the historical background of the text. BL More in-depth treatment of the history and varieties of biblical criticism. BL A timeline of major events in the ancient Near East. BL A full index to all of the study materials, keyed to the page numbers on which they occur. BL A full glossary of scholarly and critical terms. BL 36-page section of full color New Oxford Bible Maps, approximately 40 in-text line drawing maps and diagrams. Classic but not stodgy, up-to-date but not trendy, The New Oxford Annotated Bible: 4th Edition is ready to serve new generations of students, teachers, and general readers.

  • Strategic Leadership: Theory and Research on Executives, Top Management Teams, and Boards

    This book integrates and assesses the vast and rapidly growing literature on strategic leadership, which is the study of top executives and their effects on organizations. The basic premise is that in order to understand why organizations do the things they do, or perform the way they do, we need to deeply comprehend the people at the top- their experiences, abilities, values, social connections, aspirations, and other human features. The actions - or inactions - of a relatively small number of key people at the apex of an organization can dramatically affect organizational outcomes. The scope of strategic leadership includes individual executives, especially chief executive officers (CEOs), groups of executives (top management teams, or TMTs); and governing bodies (particularly boards of directors). Accordingly, the book addresses an array of topics regarding CEOs (e.g., values, personality, motives, demography, succession, and compensation); TMTs (including composition, processes, and dynamics; and boards of directors (why boards look and behave the way they do, and the consequences of board profiles and behaviors). Strategic Leadership synthesizes what is known about strategic leadership and indicates new research directions. The book is meant primarily for scholars who strive to assess and understand the phenomena of strategic leadership. It offers a considerable foundation on which professionals involved in executive search, compensation, appraisal and staffing, as well as board members who evaluate executive performance and potential, might build their tools and perspectives.

  • The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion

    This is a comprehensive resource of original essays by leading thinkers exploring the newly emerging inter-disciplinary field of the philosophy of psychiatry. The contributors aim to define this exciting field and to highlight the philosophical assumptions and issues that underlie psychiatric theory and practice, the category of mental disorder, and rationales for its social, clinical and legal treatment. As a branch of medicine and a healing practice, psychiatry relies on presuppositions that are deeply and unavoidably philosophical. Conceptions of rationality, personhood and autonomy frame our understanding and treatment of mental disorder. Philosophical questions of evidence, reality, truth, science, and values give meaning to each of the social institutions and practices concerned with mental health care. The psyche, the mind and its relation to the body, subjectivity and consciousness, personal identity and character, thought, will, memory, and emotions are equally the stuff of traditional philosophical inquiry and of the psychiatric enterprise. A new research field--the philosophy of psychiatry--began to form during the last two decades of the twentieth century. Prompted by a growing recognition that philosophical ideas underlie many aspects of clinical practice, psychiatric theorising and research, mental health policy, and the economics and politics of mental health care, academic philosophers, practitioners, and philosophically trained psychiatrists have begun a series of vital, cross-disciplinary exchanges. This volume provides a sampling of the research yield of those exchanges. Leading thinkers in this area, including clinicians, philosophers, psychologists, and interdisciplinary teams, provide original discussions that are not only expository and critical, but also a reflection of their authors' distinctive and often powerful and imaginative viewpoints and theories. All the discussions break new theoretical ground. As befits such an interdisciplinary effort, they are methodologically eclectic, and varied and divergent in their assumptions and conclusions; together, they comprise a significant new exploration, definition, and mapping of the philosophical aspects of psychiatric theory and practice.

  • Teaching Music Globally: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture and Thinking Musically

    Teaching Music Globally guides readers in using Thinking Musically and its accompanying case studies. Essential for anyone who wishes to teach beginning students of any age about music from around the world, it describes many instructional techniques and offers a wealth of learning activities.

  • Population Health: Concepts and methods

    Population health encompasses traditional public health and preventive medicine but emphasizes the full range of health determinants affecting the entire population rather than only ill or high-risk individuals. The population health approach integrates the social and biological, the quantitative and qualitative, recognizing the importance of social and cultural factors in practice and research. This text is organized around the logical sequence of studying and attempting to improve the health of populations; measuring health status and disease burden, identifying and modelling health determinants, assessing health risks and inferring causation, designing research studies, planning interventions, and evaluating health programs. The second edition incorporates many new topics that reflect changes in contemporary public health concerns and our response to them; as well as shifts in research directions. These include lifecourse approaches to health, gene-environment interactions, emergent infections, and bioterrorism. Among the specific changes are new or expanded discussions of confidence intervals for commonly used rates, the impact of population ageing on mortality trends, health survey questionnaires, summary measures of population health, the new International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, migrant studies, race and ethnicity, psychoneuroendocrine pathways, social epidemiology, risk perception, communicating the SARS epidemic, ecologic studies, the odds radio, participatory research, suicide, evidence-based community interventions, evaluation methods and health economics, the Cochrane Collaboration, and systemic reviews. The many positive features of the first edition have been retained, such as the extensive use of boxes, case studies, and exercises; the selection of examples representing a variety of health problems, geographic regions, and historical periods; and a multidisciplinary orientation bridging the quantitative and qualitative, the social and biomedical sciences. The book aims to spark a new kind of broad-based training for researchers and practitioners of population health.

  • Music in Japan: Book & CD

    Music in Japan: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture is one of the case study volumes in the Global Music Series, edited by Bonnie C. Wade and Patricia Shehan Campbell. This volume provides a vivid introduction to the music of contemporary Japan, a nation in which traditional music, Western music, and popular music thrive side by side. This text points out the centrality of Western and Popular musical idioms in Japanese cultural life, exploring how music in Japan has been profoundly affected by the interface with other cultures. Additionally, the text discusses the intertextuality of Japanese music, exploring how familiar themes, musical sounds, and structures have been maintained and transformed across the various traditions of Japanese performing arts through time. The text features eyewitness accounts of performances, interviews with performers, and a 70-minute CD containing examples of music discussed in the text.

  • Setting the Moral Compass: Essays by Women Philosophers

    Setting the Moral Compass brings together the (largely unpublished) work of nineteen women moral philosophers whose powerful and innovative work has contributed to the "re-setting of the compass" of moral philosophy over the past two decades. The contributors, who include many of the top names in this field, tackle several wide-ranging projects: they develop ethics for ordinary life and vulnerable persons; they examine the question of what we ought to do for each other; they highlight the moral significance of inhabiting a shared social world; they reveal the complexities of moral negotiations; and finally they show us the place of emotion in moral life.

  • Combattre la pauvreté. Rapport 2000/2001

    At the start of each decade the World Development Report focuses on poverty reduction. The World Development Report, now in its twenty-third edition, proposes an empowerment-security-opportunity framework of action to reduce poverty in the first decades of the twenty-first century. It views poverty as a multidimensional phenonmenon arising out of complex interactions between assets, markets, and institutions. This Report shows how the experience of poverty reduction in the last fifteen years has been remarkably diverse and how this experience has provided useful lessons as well as warnings against simplistic universal policies and interventions. It shows how current global trends present extraordinary opportunities for poverty reduction but also cause extraordinary risks, including growing inequality, marginalization, and social explosions. The World Development Report 2000/2001 explores the challenge of managing these risks in order to make the most of the opportunities for poverty reduction.

  • Energy and the Environment

    In an age of mounting energy crises, James A. Fay and Daniel Golomb's Energy and the Environment addresses a central and critical problem in urban-industrial societies: the destructive relationship between energy use and the environment. Intended for upper-level undergraduate and first-year graduate students, as well as professionals in the fields of energy and environmental sciences and technology, this ground-breaking text develops the scientific and technological background for understanding how rapidly increasing use of energy threatens the natural environment at local, regional, and global scales. Fay describes fossil, nuclear, and renewable energy technologies and their effectiveness in transforming the source of energy to useful mechanical or electrical power. Special emphasis is given to the generation of electric power and the use of transportation vehicles, as well as the technological improvements that increase energy efficiency and reduce air pollutant emissions. In addition, the text analyzes the source of toxic emissions to air, water, and land that arise from energy uses and their effects on environmental quality at urban and regional scales. This book aims to equip engineering and science majors and professionals with the basic factual knowledge needed to develop solutions to these environmental problems.

  • After the Earth Quakes: Elastic Rebound on an Urban Planet

    Earthquakes rank among the most terrifying natural disasters faced by mankind. Out of a clear blue sky-or worse, a jet black one-comes shaking strong enough to hurl furniture across the room, human bodies out of bed, and entire houses off of their foundations. When the dust settles, the immediate aftermath of an earthquake in an urbanized society can be profound. Phone and water supplies can be disrupted for days, fires erupt, and even a small number of overpass collapses can snarl traffic for months. However, when one examines the collective responses of developed societies to major earthquake disasters in recent historic times, a somewhat surprising theme emerges: not only determination, but resilience; not only resilience, but acceptance; not only acceptance, but astonishingly, humor. Elastic rebound is one of the most basic tenets of modern earthquake science, the term that scientists use to describe the build-up and release of energy along faults. It is also the best metaphor for societal responses to major earthquakes in recent historic times. After The Earth Quakes focuses on this theme, using a number of pivotal and intriguing historic earthquakes as illustration. The book concludes with a consideration of projected future losses on an increasingly urbanized planet, including the near-certainty that a future earthquake will someday claim over a million lives. This grim prediction impels us to take steps to mitigate earthquake risk, the innately human capacity for rebound notwithstanding.

  • Apes, Language, and the Human Mind

    Current primate research has yielded stunning results that not only threaten our underlying assumptions about the cognitive and communicative abilities of nonhuman primates, but also bring into question what it means to be human. At the forefront of this research, Sue Savage-Rumbaugh recently has achieved a scientific breakthrough of impressive proportions. Her work with Kanzi, a laboratory-reared bonobo, has led to Kanzi's acquisition of linguistic and cognitive skills similar to those of a two and a half year-old human child. Apes, Language, and the Human Mind skillfully combines a fascinating narrative of the Kanzi research with incisive critical analysis of the research's broader linguistic, psychological, and anthropological implications. The first part of the book provides a detailed, personal account of Kanzi's infancy, youth, and upbringing, while the second part addresses the theoretical, conceptual, and methodological issues raised by the Kanzi research. The authors discuss the challenge to the foundations of modern cognitive science presented by the Kanzi research; the methods by which we represent and evaluate the abilities of both primates and humans; and the implications which ape language research has for the study of the evolution of human language. Sure to be controversial, this exciting new volume offers a radical revision of the sciences of language and mind, and will be important reading for all those working in the fields of primatology, anthropology, linguistics, philosophy of mind, and cognitive and developmental psychology.

  • Platonism and Anti-Platonism in Mathematics

    In this deft and vigorous book, Mark Balaguer demonstrates that there are no good arguments for or against mathematical platonism (i.e., the view that abstract, or non-spatio-temporal, mathematical objects exist, and that mathematical theories are descriptions of such objects). Balaguer does this by establishing that both platonism and anti-platonism are defensible positions. In Part I, he shows that the former is defensible by introducing a novel version of platonism, which he calls full-blooded platonism, or FBP. He argues that if platonists endorse FBP, they can then solve all of the problems traditionally associated with their view, most notably the two Benacerrafian problems (that is, the epistemological problem and the non-uniqueness problem). In Part II, Balaguer defends anti-platonism (in particular, mathematical fictionalism) against various attacks, chief among them the Quine-Putnam indispensability argument. Balaguer's version of fictionalism bears similarities to Hartry Field's, but the arguments Balaguer uses to defend this view are very different. Parts I and II of this book taken together clearly establish that we do not have any good argument for or against platonism. In Part III, Balaguer extends his conclusions, arguing that it is not simply that we do not currently have any good argument for or against platonism, but that we could never have such an argument, and indeed, that there is no fact of the matter as to whether platonism is correct (ie., whether there exist any abstract objects). This lucid and accessibly written book breaks new ground in its area of engagement and makes vital reading for both specialists and anyone else interested in the philosophy of mathematics or metaphysics in general.

  • The Guide to Community Preventive Services: What Works to Promote Health?

    The gold standard for evidence-based public health, The Guide to Community Preventive Services is a primary resource to improve health and prevent disease in states, communities, independent, non-federal Task Force on Community Preventive Services, the guide uses comprehensive systemic review methods to evaluate population-oriented health interventions. The recommendations of the Task Force are explicitly linked to the scientific evidence developed during systematic reviews. This volume examines the effectiveness and efficiency of interventions to combat such risky behaviours as tobacco use, physical inactivity, and violence; to reduce the impact and suffering of specific conditions such as cancer, diabetes, vaccine-preventable diseases, and motor vehicle injuries; and to address social determinants oh health such as education, housing, and access to care. The chapters are grouped into three broad categories: changing risk behaviours; reducing specific diseases, injuries, and impairments; and methodological background for the book itself.

  • Empirical Musicology: Aims, Methods, Prospects

    This book provides a practical guide to empirical approaches that are ready for incorporation in the contemporary musicologist's toolkit, including perspectives from music theory, computational musicology, ethnomusicology, and the psychology and sociology of music.

  • The Making of a Confederate: Walter Lenoir's Civil War

    Despite the advances of the civil rights movement, many white southerners cling to the faded glory of a romanticized Confederate past. In The Making of a Confederate, William L. Barney focuses on the life of one man, Walter Lenoir of North Carolina, to examine the origins of southern white identity alongside its myriad ambiguities and complexities. Born into a wealthy slaveholding family, Lenoir abhorred the institution, opposed secession, and planned to leave his family to move to Minnesota, in the free North. But when the war erupted in 1860, Lenoir found another escape route--he joined the Confederate army, an experience that would radically transform his ideals. After the war, Lenoir, like many others, embraced the cult of the Lost Cause, refashioning his memory and beliefs in an attempt to make sense of the war, its causes, and its consequences. While some Southerners sank into depression, aligned with the victors, or fiercely opposed the new order, Lenoir withdrew to his acreage in the North Carolina mountains. There, he pursued his own vision of the South's future, one that called for greater self-sufficiency and a more efficient use of the land. For Lenoir and many fellow Confederates, the war never really ended. As he tells this compelling story, Barney offers new insights into the ways that (selective) memory informs history; through Lenoir's life, readers learn how individual choices can transform abstract historical processes into concrete actions.

  • Oxford, Latin Course

    Designed for North American students, this special version of the Oxford Latin Course combines the best features of both modern and traditional methods of Latin teaching, providing an exciting, stimulating introduction and approach to Latin based on the reading of original texts.
    In this four-volume North American edition, the order of declensions corresponds to customary U.S. usage, and the spelling has been Americanized. In addition, it offers full-color illustrations and photographs throughout Parts I and II and an expanded Teacher's Book with translations for each part. Parts I-III (now available in hardcover editions) are built around a narrative detailing the life of Horace, now based more closely on historical sources, which helps students to get to know real Romans--with their daily activities, concerns, and habits--and to develop an understanding of Roman civilization during the time of Cicero and Augustus. Part IV (paperback) is a reader consisting of extracts from Caesar, Cicero, Catullus, Virgil, Livy, and Ovid.
    The second edition of the Oxford Latin Course has been carefully designed to maximize student interest, understanding, and competence. It features a clearer presentation of grammar, revised narrative passages, new background sections, more emphasis on daily life and on the role of women, a greater number and variety of exercises, and review chapters and tests. Each chapter opens with a set of cartoons with Latin captions that illustrate new grammar points. A Latin reading follows, with new vocabulary highlighted in the margins and follow-up exercises that focus on reading comprehension and grammatical analysis. A background essay in English concludes each chapter. Covering a variety of topics--from history to food, from slavery to travel, these engaging essays present a well-rounded picture of Augustan Rome.
    The Oxford Latin Course, Second Edition offers today's students and teachers an exceptionally engaging and attractive introduction to the language, literature, and culture of Rome--one that builds skills effectively and is exciting to use.

  • Reopening the Word: Reading Mark as Theology in the Context of Early Judaism

    In this book, Marie Sabin argues that Mark's gospel represents an early and evolving Christianity, which shaped its theological discourse out of the forms familiar to early Judaism. In that early Jewish context, she says, theology took the form of connecting scripture with current events: the biblical word was continually reopened - i.e. reinterpreted - so as to reveal its relevance to the present faith-community. At the time, the chief genre for this hermeneutical process was the synagogue homily. Sabin contends that Mark's composition represented an interweaving of homilies preached by Jesus and his followers in the local synagogues. Sabin sees Mark not as a mere collector or scribe, however, but as an original theologian shaping his material in the context of two theological traditions: the Jewish wisdom traditions and Jewish Creation theology. Reading Mark in the contexts of these traditions reveals fresh meanings that break open Christian formulas long frozen in time and illuminate the Gospel's striking relevance to our own time.

  • Minds Behind the Brain: A history of the pioneers and their discoveries

    Attractively illustrated with over a hundred halftones and drawings, this volume presents a series of vibrant profiles that trace the evolution of our knowledge about the brain. Beginning almost 5000 years ago, with the ancient Egyptian study of "the marrow of the skull," Stanley Finger takes us on a fascinating journey from the classical world of Hippocrates, to the time of Descartes and the era of Broca and Ramon y Cajal, to modern researchers such as Sperry. Here is a truly remarkable cast of characters. We meet Galen, a man of titanic ego and abrasive disposition, whose teachings dominated medicine for a thousand years; Vesalius, a contemporary of Copernicus, who pushed our understanding of human anatomy to new heights; Otto Loewi, pioneer in neurotransmitters, who gave the Nazis his Nobel prize money and fled Austria for England; and Rita Levi-Montalcini, discoverer of nerve growth factor, who in war-torn Italy was forced to do her research in her bedroom. For each individual, Finger examines the philosophy, the tools, the books, and the ideas that brought new insights. Finger also looks at broader topics--how dependent are researchers on the work of others? What makes the time ripe for discovery? And what role does chance or serendipity play? And he includes many fascinating background figures as well, from Leonardo da Vinci and Emanuel Swedenborg to Karl August Weinhold, who claimed to have reanimated a dead cat by filling its skull with silver and zinc, and Mary Shelley, who's Frankenstein was inspired by such experiments. Wide ranging in scope, imbued with an infectious spirit of adventure, here are vivid portraits of giants in the field of neuroscience - remarkable individuals who found new ways to think about the machinery of the mind.

  • Epilepsy in Our Experience: Accounts of Health Care Professionals

    This book reveals the wide range of emotions, challenges and triumphs experienced by those who work with epilepsy patients and their families. The book also records the profound, uplifting and often heartbreaking experiences of practitioners with seizures who have come to understand, firsthand, the perspective of patients with epilepsy. ABOUT THE SERIES: With the Brainstorms series, one of the world's leading authorities on epilepsy, Dr Steven C. Schachter, has gathered together the personal testimonies of patients, family members, and caregivers to create a poignant and gripping series of books on this misunderstood and often devastating disorder.

  • Dignity Therapy: Final Words for Final Days

    Maintaining dignity for patients approaching death is a core principle of palliative care. Translating that principle into methods of guiding care at the end of life, however, can be a complicated and daunting task. Dignity therapy, a psychological intervention developed by Dr. Harvey Max Chochinov and his internationally lauded research group, has been designed specifically to address many of the psychological, existential, and spiritual challenges that patients and their families face as they grapple with the reality of life drawing to a close. Tested with patients with advanced illnesses in Canada, the United States, Australia, China, Scotland, England, and Denmark, dignity therapy has been shown to not only benefit patients, but their families as well. In the first book to lay out the blueprint for this unique and meaningful intervention, Chochinov addresses one of the most important dimensions of being human. Being alive means being vulnerable and mortal; he argues that dignity therapy offers a way to preserve meaning and hope for patients approaching death. Dignity Therapy: Final Words for Final Days is a beautiful introduction to this pioneering and innovative work. With history and foundations of dignity in care, and step by step guidance for readers interested in implementing the program, this volume illuminates how dignity therapy can change end-of-life experience for those about to die - and for those who will grieve their passing.

  • Quantum Monte Carlo: Origins, Development, Applications

    Monte Carlo methods are a class of computational algorithms for simulating the behavior of a wide range of various physical and mathematical systems (with many variables). Their utility has increased with general availability of fast computers, and new applications are continually forthcoming. The basic concepts of Monte Carlo are both simple and straightforward and rooted in statistics and probability theory, their defining characteristic being that the methodology relies on random or pseudo-random sequences of numbers. It is a technique of numerical analysis based on the approximate solution of a problem using repeated sampling experiments and observing the proportion of times a given property is satisfied. The term Monte Carlo was first used to describe calculational methods based on chance in the 1940s, but the methods themselves preceded the term by as much as a century. Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) first appeared in 1982 and similarly was preceded by development of the related calculational methodology. The success of QMC methods over the past few decades has been remarkable, and this book will clearly demonstrate that success in its discussion of applications. For isolated molecules, the basic material of chemistry, QMC methods have produced exact solutions of the Schroedinger equation for very small systems and the most accurate solutions available for very large systems. The range of applications is impressive: folding of protein molecules, interactions in liquids, structure modeling in crystals and enzymes, quantum dots, designing heat shields and aerodynamic forms, architecture, design, business and economics, and even cinema and video games (3D modeling). This book takes a similar approach to Henry Schaefers classic book Quantum Chemistry (OUP, 1984 now a Dover edition), collecting summaries of some of the most important papers in the quantum Monte Carlo literature, tying everything together with analysis and discussion of applications. Quantum Monte Carlo is a reference book for quantum Monte Carlo applications, belonging near the desk of every quantum chemist, physicist, and a wide range of scientists and engineers across many disciplines, destined to become a classic.

  • The Classic Fairy Tales

    This volume contains twenty-four of the best known fairy tales in the English language, presented here in the exact words of their first English publication or of the earliest surviving text. Including "Sleeping Beauty," "Bluebeard," "Cinderella," "Thumbelina," and "Hansel and Gretel," as well as many others, this collection provides a historical introduction for each tale and a general Introduction which traces the history of fairy tales collected in Asia and Europe long before they appeared in English.

  • The Sea Around Us

    Published in 1951, The Sea Around Us was a phenomenal success. Rachel Carson's rare ability to combine scientific insight with moving, poetic prose catapulted her book to first place on The New York Times bestseller list, where it remained on top for thirty-one consecutive weeks. It stayed on the list for more than a year and a half and ultimately sold well over a million copies, has been translated into 28 languages, inspired an Academy Award-winning documentary, and won both the 1952 National Book Award and the John Burroughs Medal.
    This commemorative edition has over 130 beautiful, full color illustrations from all over the world--everything from breaching whales, Christmas Tree worms and phosphorescent shrimp, to fur seals, flashlight fish, and giant squid. The volume features a foreword by Carl Safina, a founder of the Blue Ocean Institute; an introduction by explorer Robert D. Ballard, renowned for his role in finding the Titanic as well as for his discovery of life around deep-sea hydrothermal vents; and an afterword by Brian J. Skinner, an eminent geologist and former president of the Geological Society of America.
    The book itself remains as fresh today as when it first appeared. Carson's writing teems with stunning, memorable images--the newly formed Earth cooling beneath an endlessly overcast sky; the centuries of nonstop rain that created the oceans; incredibly powerful tides moving 100 billion tons of water daily in the Bay of Fundy. Quite simply, she captures the mystery and allure of the ocean with a compelling blend of imagination and expertise.
    For anyone who loves to wander the shore, sail the ocean, or ponder what lies beneath the waves, this illustrated special edition of The Sea Around Us will make a perfect gift.

  • Evolutionary Medicine and Health: New Perspectives

    Building on the success of their groundbreaking anthology Evolutionary Medicine (OUP, 1999), Wenda R. Trevathan, E. O. Smith, and James J. McKenna provide an up-to-date and thought-provoking introduction to the field with this new collection of essays. Ideal for courses in evolutionary medicine, medical anthropology, and the evolution of human disease, Evolutionary Medicine and Health: New Perspectives presents twenty-three original articles that examine how human evolution relates to a broad range of contemporary health problems including infectious, chronic, nutritional, and mental diseases and disorders. Topics covered include disease susceptibility in cultural context, substance abuse and addiction, sleep disorders, preeclampsia, altitude-related hypoxia, the biological context of menstruation, and the role of stress in modern life. An international team of preeminent scholars in biological anthropology, medicine, biology, psychology, and geography contributed the selections. Together they represent a uniquely integrative and multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the dialogue between biology and culture as it relates to understanding, treating, and preventing disease. A common theme throughout is the description of cases in which biological human development conflicts with culturally based individual behaviors that determine health outcomes. Detailed, evidence-based arguments make the case that all aspects of the human condition covered in the volume have an evolutionary basis, while theoretical discussions using other empirical evidence critique the gaps that still remain in evolutionary approaches to health. Evolutionary Medicine and Health: New Perspectives features an introductory overview that covers the field's diverse array of topics, questions, lines of evidence, and perspectives. In addition, the editors provide introductions to each essay and an extensive bibliography that represents a state-of-the-art survey of the literature. A companion website at www.oup.com/us/evolmed offers a full bibliography and links to source articles, reports, and databases. Written in an engaging style that is accessible to students, professionals, and general readers, this book offers a unique look at how an evolutionary perspective has become increasingly relevant to the health field and medical practice.

  • Children With Cancer: A Comprehensive Reference Guide for Parents

    Today most children can and do survive cancer, but the bewildering range of modern treatments, and the stunning number of information sources, can be daunting for parents trying to manage the health and care of their children. Written honestly but in a deeply reassuring tone by a reference librarian whose child survived cancer, Children with Cancer was the first book to bring together a wealth of up-to-date information essential for anyone who wishes to help a child or family through this ordeal--including relatives, friends, teachers, and clergymen. Now, in this revised and updated edition, Jeanne Munn Bracken once again offers parents and care providers a warmly written and reliable guide through the childhood cancer experience. The information collected here ranges from sophisticated, hard-to-find medical facts to practical tips on how to handle side effects, and much more. Describing in detail the whole range of childhood cancers, Bracken explores how they affect the child, the treatments available, how to cope with the changes this diagnosis will bring to the entire family, and where to go for both medical and emotional help. Children with Cancer also includes an appendix of common medical tests, a glossary of terms, and comprehensive lists of organizations, clinics, and cancer centers, complete with names and addresses. The new edition also digests and makes sense of the incredibly wide range of internet sites that deal with childhood cancer, providing readers with an accessible roadmap through this vast amount of material.

  • The Meaning of Everything: The Story of the Oxford English Dictionary

    From the best-selling author of The Professor and the Madman, The Map That Changed the World, and Krakatoa comes a truly wonderful celebration of the English language and of its unrivaled treasure house, the Oxford English Dictionary.

    Writing with marvelous brio, Winchester first serves up a lightning history of the English language--"so vast, so sprawling, so wonderfully unwieldy"--and pays homage to the great dictionary makers, from "the irredeemably famous" Samuel Johnson to the "short, pale, smug and boastful" schoolmaster from New Hartford, Noah Webster. He then turns his unmatched talent for story-telling to the making of this most venerable of dictionaries. In this fast-paced narrative, the reader will discover lively portraits of such key figures as the brilliant but tubercular first editor Herbert Coleridge (grandson of the poet), the colorful, boisterous Frederick Furnivall (who left the project in a shambles), and James Augustus Henry Murray, who spent a half-century bringing the project to fruition. Winchester lovingly describes the nuts-and-bolts of dictionary making--how unexpectedly tricky the dictionary entry for marzipan was, or how fraternity turned out so much longer and monkey so much more ancient than anticipated--and how bondmaid was left out completely, its slips found lurking under a pile of books long after the B-volume had gone to press. We visit the ugly corrugated iron structure that Murray grandly dubbed the Scriptorium--the Scrippy or the Shed, as locals called it--and meet some of the legion of volunteers, from Fitzedward Hall, a bitter hermit obsessively devoted to the OED, to W. C. Minor, whose story is one of dangerous madness, ineluctable sadness, and ultimate redemption.
    The Meaning of Everything is a scintillating account of the creation of the greatest monument ever erected to a living language. Simon Winchester's supple, vigorous prose illuminates this dauntingly ambitious project--a seventy-year odyssey to create the grandfather of all word-books, the world's unrivalled uber-dictionary.

  • Approaches to Qualitative Research: A Reader on Theory and Practice

    Approaches to Qualitative Research couples theoretical articles with practical research examples in order to help students of varying degrees develop a holistic understanding of the process of qualitative research. The book covers a wide range of traditional and emergent research methods as well as techniques of analysis and writing. Approaches to Qualitative Research also makes the critical link between theory and method explicit through carefully selected articles and in-depth introductory essays.

  • The Lute in Britain: A History of the Instrument and Its Music

    The lute was one of the most important instruments in use in Europe from late medieval times up to the eighteenth century. Despite its acknowledged importance, this study is the first ever comprehensive work on the instrument and its music, apart from performance studies or bibliographical and reference publications. The book focuses on the lute's history, but also contains chapters on the lute in concert, lute song accompaniment, the thearbo, and the lute in Scotland. Written for the music student, the serious listener, the player, maker, and lute enthusiast, Spring makes available for the first time over 40 years of musical scholarship previously the preserve of academic journals.

  • Confronting AIDS: Public Priorities in a Global Epidemic

    This updated edition of 'Confronting AIDS' includes a vital, new statistical appendix that assembles information about the levels and determinants of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and selected policy variables for low- and middle-income countries. It draws on three bodies of knowledge: the epidemiology of HIV; public health insights into disease control; and especially public economics, which focuses on assessing tradeoffs in the allocation of scarce public resources. This title is written to inform and motivate political leaders, policymakers, and development specialists to support the public health community, concerned civil society, and people living with HIV in dealing with this devastating disease.

  • Ancient Egypt

    In "Ancient Egypt, " eminent Egyptologist Silverman and a team of leading scholars explore the cultural wealth of this civilization in a series of intriguing and authoritative essays based on the latest theories and discoveries. 200+ color photos, maps, and charts.

  • Strategies of Containment

    When Strategies of Containment was first published, the Soviet Union was still a superpower, Ronald Reagan was president of the United States, and the Berlin Wall was still standing. This updated edition of Gaddis' classic carries the history of containment through the end of the Cold War. Beginning with Franklin D. Roosevelt's postwar plans, Gaddis provides a thorough critical analysis of George F. Kennan's original strategy of containment, NSC-68, The Eisenhower-Dulles "New Look," the Kennedy-Johnson "flexible response" strategy, the Nixon-Kissenger strategy of detente, and now a comprehensive assessment of how Reagan-- and Gorbechev-- completed the process of containment, thereby bringing the Cold War to an end. He concludes, provocatively, that Reagan more effectively than any other Cold War president drew upon the strengths of both approaches while avoiding their weaknesses. A must-read for anyone interested in Cold War history, grand strategy, and the origins of the post-Cold War world.

  • From the Kitchen to the Parlor: Language and Becoming in African American Women's Hair Care

    When is hair "just hair" and when is it not "just hair"? Documenting the politics of African American women's hair, this multi-sited linguistic ethnography explores everyday interaction in beauty parlors, Internet discussions, comedy clubs, and other contexts to illuminate how and why hair matters in African American women's day-to-day experiences.

  • Experimental Philosophy

    Experimental philosophy is a new movement that seeks to return the discipline of philosophy to a focus on questions about how people actually think and feel. Departing from a long-standing tradition, experimental philosophers go out and conduct systematic experiments to reach a better understanding of people's ordinary intuitions about philosophically significant questions. Although the movement is only a few years old, it has already sparked an explosion of new research, challenging a number of cherished assumptions in both philosophy and cognitive science. The present volume provides an introduction to the major themes of work in experimental philosophy, bringing together some of the most influential articles in the field along with a collection of new papers that explore the theoretical significance of this new research.

  • Theological Incorrectness: Why Religious People Believe What They Shouldn't

    Why do religious people believe what they shouldn't - not what others think they shouldn't believe, but things that don't accord with their own avowed religious beliefs? Slone terms this phenomenon 'theological incorrectness'. He argues that it exists because the mind is built in such a way that it is natural for us to think divergent thoughts simultaneously. Human minds are great at coming up with innovative ideas that help them make sense of the world, but those ideas do not always accord with official religious beliefs. Slone presents the latest discoveries from the cognitive science of religion and shows how they help us to understand exactly why it is that religious people do and think things that they shouldn't.

  • Advice and Consent: The Politics of Judicial Appointments

    From Louis Brandeis to Robert Bork to Clarence Thomas, the nomination of federal judges has generated intense political conflict. With the coming retirement of one or more Supreme Court Justices--and threats to filibuster lower court judges--the selection process is likely to be, once again, the center of red-hot partisan debate. In Advice and Consent, two leading legal scholars, Lee Epstein and Jeffrey A. Segal, offer a brief, illuminating Baedeker to this highly important procedure, discussing everything from constitutional background, to crucial differences in the nomination of judges and justices, to the role of the Judiciary Committee in vetting nominees. Epstein and Segal shed light on the role played by the media, by the American Bar Association, and by special interest groups (whose efforts helped defeat Judge Bork). Though it is often assumed that political clashes over nominees are a new phenomenon, the authors argue that the appointment of justices and judges has always been a highly contentious process--one largely driven by ideological and partisan concerns. The reader discovers how presidents and the senate have tried to remake the bench, ranging from FDR's controversial "court packing" scheme to the Senate's creation in 1978 of 35 new appellate and 117 district court judgeships, allowing the Democrats to shape the judiciary for years. The authors conclude with possible "reforms," from the so-called nuclear option, whereby a majority of the Senate could vote to prohibit filibusters, to the even more dramatic suggestion that Congress eliminate a judge's life tenure either by term limits or compulsory retirement. With key appointments looming on the horizon, Advice and Consent provides everything concerned citizens need to know to understand the partisan rows that surround the judicial nominating process.

  • A New English Translation of the Septuagint

    The Septuagint (the ancient Greek translation of Jewish sacred writings) is of great importance in the history of both Judaism and Christianity. The first translation of the books of the Hebrew Bible (plus additions) into the common language of the ancient Mediterranean world made the Jewish scriptures accessible to many outside Judaism. Not only did the Septuagint become Holy Writ to Greek speaking Jews but it was also the Bible of the early Christian communities: the scripture they cited and the textual foundation of the early Christian movement. Translated from Hebrew (and Aramaic) originals in the two centuries before Jesus, the Septuagint provides important information about the history of the text of the Bible. For centuries, scholars have looked to the Septuagint for information about the nature of the text and of how passages and specific words were understood. For students of the Bible, the New Testament in particular, the study of the Septuagint's influence is a vital part of the history of interpretation. But until now, the Septuagint has not been available to English readers in a modern and accurate translation. The New English Translation of the Septuagint fills this gap.

  • Suffering and Moral Responsibility

    In this original study, Jamie Mayerfeld undertakes a careful inquiry into the meaning and moral significance of suffering. Understanding suffering in hedonistic terms as an affliction of feeling, he addresses difficulties associated with its identification and measurement. He then turns to an examination of the duty to relieve suffering: its content, its weight relative to other moral considerations, and the role it should play in our lives. Among the claims defended in the book are that suffering needs to be distinguished from both physical pain and the frustration of desire, that interpersonal comparisons of the intensity of happiness and suffering are possible, that several psychological processes hinder our awareness of other people's suffering, and that the prevention of suffering should often be pursued indirectly. Mayerfeld concludes his discussion by arguing that the reduction of suffering is morally more important than the promotion of happiness, and that most of us greatly underestimate the force of the duty to prevent suffering. As the first systematic book-length inquiry into the moral significance of suffering, Suffering and Moral Responsibility makes an important contribution to moral philosophy and political theory, and will interest specialists in each of these areas.

  • A Short History of the Jewish People: From Legendary Times to Modern Statehood

    Where did the Jews come from? How did they retain their strong sense of community through centuries of dispersion? How have the Jews of the present, with their proud ethnic identity and thriving national home, emerged out of the downtrodden Jews of the past? Such questions arise naturally in the minds of anyone contemplating the long history of Jewish people. In one concise, authoritative volume, A Short History of the Jewish People provides insights and answers.

    This sweeping and highly informative work presents the major geographical, cultural, and political forces that have determined the course of Jewish history, introducing the many individuals, both religious and secular, who have shaped the character, mindset, and prospects of the Jewish people. Organized chronologically, the narrative follows the Jewish experience from legendary times to the peace agreements currently being negotiated in the Middle East. And, to give this overview an international and timely perspective, Raymond P. Scheindlin focuses his study on the pivotal events and dominant communities within each historical period.

    Written by a respected Hebrew scholar, cultural historian, noted author, and rabbi, A Short History of the Jewish People carefully describes the story of a people as varied as the many cultures in which they have lived. Including detailed maps and stirring photos, as well as timelines and sidebars, this pioneering work is a valuable resource for anyone broadly curious about the Jewish people.

  • Clear and to the Point: 8 psychological principles for compelling PowerPoint presentations

    Making PowerPoint presentations that are clear, compelling, memorable, and even enjoyable is not an obscure art. In this book, Stephen Kosslyn, a renowned cognitive neuroscientist, presents eight simple principles for constructing a presentation that takes advantage of the information modern science has discovered about perception, memory, and cognition. Using hundreds of images and sample slides, he shows the common mistakes many people make and the simple ways to fix them. For example, never use underlining to emphasize a word, the line will cut off the bottom of letters that have descending lines (such as p and g), which interferes with the brain's ability to recognize text. Other tips include why you should state your conclusion at the beginning of a presentation, when to use a line graph versus a bar graph, and how to use color correctly. By following Kosslyn's principles, anyone will be able to produce a presentation that works!

  • Al-Kind=i

    The first book in the Great Medieval Thinkers series to focus on an Islamic philosopher. It offers a brief, accessible introduction to the thought of the philosopher al -Kindi (died roughly 870 AD). His works, though brief, are of great historical importance. Al-Kindi was the first philosopher of the Islamic world. Peter Adamson will survey what is known of al-Kindi's life, examine his thought on a wide range of topics, and consider the relationship of al-Kindi's work to his Greek sources.

  • Prescriptions for Choral Excellence: Tone, Text, Dynamic Leadership

    In shaping choral tone, directors often wish to improve the sound of their choir, but are challenged to pinpoint underlying problems or to guide singers toward solutions. Now, in Prescriptions for Choral Excellence, skilled vocal pedagogue Shirlee Emmons and leading choral director Constance Chase equip choral directors with the practical tools they need to help singers achieve peak choral performance. Drawing on years of experience, Emmons and Chase help choral directors and singers effectively diagnose and resolve problems. They cover topics ranging from breath management and diction to range and intonation, and much more. Beyond describing vocal difficulties, the book provides concrete instructions on how to apply the concepts in day-to-day rehearsal and performance. The numerous practical exercises and planning aides allow directors to maximize both time and talent to elicit the highest potential from their singers. While grounded in the most up-to-date research in voice science, the discussion of vocal anatomy and function is accessible to readers with no previous knowledge of voice science. Going beyond other vocal and choral guidebooks, the authors also apply the most current theories in leadership principles and group dynamics to choral settings, helping directors translate their natural musicality and charisma into inspiring and motivational leadership. A comprehensive and unique blend of practical expertise, voice science, and leadership psychology, Prescriptions for Choral Excellence is an invaluable guide for all choral directors seeking to create memorable and remarkable performances.

  • Exploring Marine Biology: Laboratory and Field Exercises

    This book is the only manual of its kind with exercises that apply to the diverse marine habitats of North America. The manual meets the needs of any introductory marine biology student, from the non-major to the prospective major with a background in the biological sciences. Each unit includes a broad range of exercises, so that instructors using the manual can select the exercises that best match the needs of their introductory course. The manual is also unique in providing extensively illustrated identification keys for three of the major marine lifeforms, allowing students to identify and classify organisms within the invertebrates, plankton, and fishes.

  • In Brown's Wake: Legacies of America's Educational Landmark

    What is the legacy of Brown vs. Board of Education? Well known for establishing racial equality as a central commitment of American schools, the case also inspired social movements pursuing equality in education for students across all lines of difference, including language, gender, disability, immigration status, socio-economic status, religion, and sexual orientation. Yet, more than a half-century following Brown, schools, parents and policy makers still debate whether the ruling requires all-inclusive classrooms, and today American schools appear to be more segregated than ever. School choice, once a strategy for avoiding racial integration, has emerged as a method for racial mixing in some school systems, even as magnet and pilot schools, charter schools, and vouchers for private schools enable new forms of self-separation by language, gender, disability, and ethnicity. In In Brown's Wake, Martha Minow examines the way that Brown continues to reverberate over a wide-spectrum of equality issues in public and school choice programs. She argues that the terms placed on such initiatives carry serious consequences for both the character of American education and civil society itself. Though the original promise of Brown remains more symbolic than effective, Minow demonstrates the power of its vision in the struggles for equal education regardless of students' social identity, in the United States and internationally. Further, she urges renewed commitment to the project of social integration even while identifying the complex routes necessary to achieve it. A concise introduction to Brown and its aftermath, In Brown's Wake explores surprising and widespread effects of one of the most important Supreme Court decisions of the century with elegance and economy.

  • Did Dogen Go to China?: What He Wrote and When He Wrote It

    D=ogen (1200-1253), the founder of the S=ot=o Zen sect in Japan, is especially known for introducing to Japanese Buddhism many of the texts and practices that he discovered in China. Heine reconstructs the context of D=ogen's travels to and reflections on China by means of a critical look at traditional sources both by and about D=ogen in light of recent Japanese scholarship. While many studies emphasize the unique features of D=ogen's Japanese influences, this book calls attention to the way Chinese and Japanese elements were fused in D=ogen's religious vision. It reveals many new materials and insights into Dogen's main writings, including the multiple editions of the Sh=ob=ogenz=o, and how and when this seminal text was created by D=ogen and was edited and interpreted by his disciples. This book is the culmination of the author's thirty years of research on D=ogen and provides the reader with a comprehensive approach to the master's life works and an understanding of the overall career trajectory of one of the most important figures in the history of Buddhism and Asian religious thought.

  • You and Your Aging Parent: A Family Guide to Emotional, Social, Health, and Financial Problems

    You and Your Aging Parent, originally published in 1976, was the first book to focus on the relationship between adult children and their aging parents. By noted gerontologist Barbara Silverstone and writer Helen Kandel Hyman, it turned the spotlight on the challenges faced by many adult children as they attempt to cope when elderly relatives need increasing support. Since the last edition of the book in 1989, numerous other books on the topic have entered the market, but most of them are superficial in the information and advice they provide to their readers and in the one-note assumptions about the parent-child relationship in the senior years. Moreover, programs and services for older people have changed significantly and become more comlex; a new generation of adult children and their parents are facing the challenges of aging, and recent research findings have deepened our understanding of the aging process and late life. This revised edition, marking its 30th anniversary, will address the changes that have taken place and revive its fundamental insight - that the difficulties and challenges of the aging process are as much a family affair as in any other phase of life and that the nature of the relationship between aging parents and their adult children will directly influence how the process is navigated. The size of the senior class is growing exponentially, including parents who are living longer than any older generation in history and baby boomers who are reluctantly entering the senior class, as well as countless younger sons and daughters wondering what's coming next. This new and updated edition will answer their need for authoritative, practical information about this major new phase of life. Playwright and New York Times columnist Bob Morris joins the book as commentator, adding his own entertaining insights as a member of the baby boom generation dealing with his own elderly parents' late life.

  • The Lost World of Classical Legal Thought: Law and Ideology in America, 1886-1937

    This book examines the ideology of elite lawyers and judges from the Gilded Age through the New Deal. Between 1866 and 1937, a coherent outlook shaped the way the American bar understood the sources of law, the role of the courts, and the relationship between law and the larger society. William M. Wiecek explores this outlook-often called "legal orthodoxy" or "classical legal thought"-which assumed that law was apolitical, determinate, objective, and neutral. American classical legal thought was forged in the heat of the social crises that punctuated the late nineteenth century. Fearing labor unions, immigrants, and working people generally, American elites, including those on the bench and bar, sought ways to repress disorder and prevent political majorities from using democratic processes to redistribute wealth and power. Classical legal thought provided a rationale that assured the legitimacy of the extant distribution of society's resources. It enabled the legal suppression of unions and the subordination of workers to management's authority. As the twentieth-century U.S. economy grew in complexity, the antiregulatory, individualistic bias of classical legal thought became more and more distanced from reality. Brittle and dogmatic, legal ideology lost legitimacy in the eyes of both laypeople and ever-larger segments of the bar. It was at last abandoned in the "constitutional revolution of 1937", but-as Wiecek argues in this detailed analysis-nothing has arisen since to replace it as an explanation of what law is and why courts have such broad power in a democratic society.

  • The New Physics and Cosmology: Dialogues with the Dalai Lama

    What happens when the Dalai Lama meets with leading physicists and a historian? This book is the carefully edited record of the fascinating discussions at a Mind and Life conference in which five leading physicists and a historian (David Finkelstein, George Greenstein, Piet Hut, Arthur Zajonc, Anton Zeilinger, and Tu Weiming) discussed with the Dalai Lama current thought in theoretical quantum physics, in the context of Buddhist philosophy. A contribution to the science-religion interface, and a useful explanation of our basic understanding of quantum reality, couched at a level that intelligent readers without a deep involvement in science can grasp. In the tradition of other popular books on resonances between modern quantum physics and Zen or Buddhist mystical traditions--notably The Dancing Wu Li Masters and The Tao of Physics, this book gives a clear and useful update of the genuine correspondences between these two rather disparate approaches to understanding the nature of reality.

  • Martial's Epigrams Book Two

    This edition provides an English translation of and detailed commentary on the second book of epigrams published by the Latin poet Marcus Valerius Martialis. The past ten years have seen a resurgence of interest in Martial's writings. But contemporary readers are in particular need of assistance when approaching these epigrams, and until now there has been no modern commentary dedicated to Book II. This new commentary carefully illuminates the allusions to people, places, things, and cultural practices of late first-century Rome that pervade Martial's poetry. It analyzes the epigrammatist's poems as literary creations, treating such topics as the structure of the individual poems and of the book as a whole, and the influence of earlier texts on Martial's language and themes.

  • Music in East Africa: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture

    These captivating case studies include eyewitness accounts of performances, interviews with performers, and vivid illustrations. Each volume is packaged with a 70-minute CD that contains representative examples of the music discussed in the book. Ngoma is the hallmark of music in East Africa and a performance that incorporates drumming, singing, and dancing. Using several towns and villages as examples, this case study discusses how Ngoma performances function as important means of mediating conflicts, solidifying community and ethnicity, and communicating traditional values and social histories.

  • Ending Life: Ethics and the Way We Die

    Margaret Pabst Battin has established a reputation as one of the top philosophers working in bioethics today. This work is a sequel to Battin's 1994 volume The Least Worst Death. The last ten years have seen fast-moving developments in end-of-life issues, from the legalization of physician-assisted suicide in Oregon and the Netherlands to furor over proposed restrictions of scheduled drugs used for causing death, and the development of "NuTech" methods of assistance in dying. Battin's new collection covers a remarkably wide range of end-of-life topics, including suicide prevention, AIDS, suicide bombing, serpent-handling and other religious practices that pose a risk of death, genetic prognostication, suicide in old age, global justice and the "duty to die," and suicide, physician-assisted suicide, and euthanasia, in both American and international contexts. As with the earlier volume, these new essays are theoretically adroit but draw richly from historical sources, fictional techniques, and ample factual material.

  • 1001 Computer Words You Need to Know

    1001 Computer Words You Need to Know explains and illuminates the essential vocabulary of computers and the Internet. This comprehensive, but never condescending guide to the language of the electronic age carefully defines and explains every term with a sample sentence, and many entries have supplementary notes. In addition, the book includes a number of quick miniguides to managing your online life - dealing with Windows and Macs (and sometimes *nix), burning CDs and downloading files, word processing, spread-sheeting, connecting to the Internet (dialup, cable, DSL, wireless) surfing, IMing and emailing, taking digital photos, coping with networks, memory, and drives, and just plain coping with your computer. The backmatter contains an extensive list of helpful websites and an essay about online language and etiquette.

  • Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude: A Casebook

    Not only is One Hundred Years of Solitude regularly taught across disciplines in colleges and universities, it is also one of the few Latin American Classics that has becone recognizable to a more general public beyond academia. This collection includes ten articles by different authors that offer in-depth readings of the novel. Among the topics examined are myth, magic, women, Western Imperialism, and the Media. The book also includes the first English translation of an early eight-page appreciation by Carlos Fuentes, as well as a 1982 interview with the author. This book will provide a valuable tool for scholars, teachers, and students, as well as general readers in search of a guide to this complex literary masterpiece.

  • The Poets' Jesus: Representations at the End of a Millennium

    Poets have always been the medium through which a culture talks of, and to, its gods. Now, in this learned but lively commentary, Peggy Rosenthal shows us the astonishing range of poetic encounters with Jesus. With a special emphasis on twentieth-century poetry, Rosenthal draws from an unprecedented range of world poetry--from Africa, the Arab world, and the Far East to Latin America and the West--to give readers an understanding of how different times and different cultures have affected the way poets refigure Jesus and of how poets' fascination with the man from Nazareth transcends all barriers. She also demonstrates that, despite the twentieth century's self-definition as a secular and post-Christian epoch, it has produced poetry about Jesus of truly surprising quality and variety. Impeccably researched and extremely accessible, The Poets Jesus will strongly appeal to scholars of poetry and religion as well as for all general readers of poetry.

  • Egyptian Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Goddesses, and Traditions of Ancient Egypt

    Spanning Ancient Egyptian culture (ca. 3200 BC to AD 400), the Handbook of Egyptian Mythology is the only complete survey of Egyptian mythology of its kind available in English.

  • When Science Offers Salvation: Patient Advocacy and Research Ethics

    Biomedical research today has a high public profile, largely because of patient advocacy. Following in the footsteps of HIV/AIDS activists, advocates representing an array of patient groups are now vocal partners in the research enterprise. This book shows how advocates have transformed health research, often - but not always - for the better. Dresser is the first to examine patient advocacy through the lens of research ethics. She exposes the bright and dark sides of patients' expanded opportunities to enroll in clinical trials and join researchers in planning and evaluating studies. She considers the virtues and drawbacks of giving patients more influence over how the government invests its research dollars. She argues that advocates should do more to promote ethical human studies and responsible media reporting about research. Patient advocates can help make research more ethical, but advocacy raises ethical issues of its own. This book clearly and vividly recounts the advocacy contribution to research and explores the thorny ethical issues facing research advocates.

  • Highway 61 Revisited: The Tangled Roots of American Jazz, Blues, Rock, & Country Music

    What do Louis Armstrong, Ray Charles, Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Tom Waits, Cassandra Wilson, and Ani DiFranco have in common? In Highway 61 Revisited, acclaimed music critic Gene Santoro says the answer is jazz--not just the musical style, but jazz's distinctive ambiance and attitudes. As legendary bebop rebel Charlie Parker once put it, "If you don't live it, it won't come out of your horn." Unwinding that Zen-like statement, Santoro traces how jazz's existential art has infused outstanding musicians in nearly every wing of American popular music--blues, folk, gospel, psychedelic rock, country, bluegrass, soul, funk, hiphop--with its parallel process of self-discovery and artistic creation through musical improvisation. Taking less-traveled paths through the last century of American pop, Highway 61 Revisited maps unexpected musical and cultural links between such apparently disparate figures as Louis Armstrong, Willie Nelson, Bob Dylan and Herbie Hancock; Miles Davis, Lenny Bruce, The Grateful Dead, Bruce Springsteen, and many others. Focusing on jazz's power to connect, Santoro shows how the jazz milieu created a fertile space "where whites and blacks could meet in America on something like equal grounds," and indeed where art and entertainment, politics and poetry, mainstream culture and its subversive offshoots were drawn together in a heady mix whose influence has proved both far-reaching and seemingly inexhaustible. Combining interviews and original research, and marked throughout by Santoro's wide ranging grasp of cultural history, Highway 61 Revisited offers readers a new look at--and a new way of listening to--the many ways jazz has colored the entire range of American popular music in all its dazzling profusion.

  • The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

    Cave paintings at Lascaux, France and Altamira, Spain, fraught with expression thousands of years later; point to an early human desire to form a cultural identity. In the Oxford Companion to World Mythology, David Leeming explores the role of mythology, or myth-logic, in history and determines that the dreams of specific cultures add up to a larger collective story of humanity. Stopping short of attempting to be all-inclusive, this fascinating volume will nonetheless be comprehensive, opening with an introduction exploring the nature and dimensions of myth and proposing a definition as a universal language. Briefly dipping into the ways our understanding of myth has changed from Aristotle and Plato to modern scholars such as Joseph Campbell, the introduction loosely places the concept in its present context and precedes articles on influential mythologists and mythological approaches that appear later in the Companion. The main body of Leeming's work consists of A-Z entries covering all aspects of mythology, including substantial essays on the world's major mythological traditions (Greek, Native American, Indian, Japanese, Sumerian, Egyptian), mythological types and motifs (Descent to the Underworld, the Hero, the Trickster, Creation, the Quest), mythological figures (Odysseus, Zeus, Osiris, Spider Woman, and Inanna) as well as numerous interrelated subjects such as fairy tales and legends. The Companion also locates myth in our lives today, relating it to language patterns, psychology, religion, politics, art, and gender attitudes. Many of the better-known and more significant myths are vividly retold in this volume that will be illustrated with maps, more than 70 black and white images, and eight pages of color highlighting the central role art has often played in the transmission and perpetuation of myth. Following the entries, a rich section of appendices will include family trees of the major pantheons, equivalency charts for the gods of Greece and Rome, Babylon and Sumer, as well as other traditions, an extensive bibliography, and an index.

  • Striptease: The Untold History of the Girlie Show

    Striptease recreates the combustible mixture of license, independence, and sexual curiosity that allowed strippers to thrive for nearly a century. Rachel Shteir brings to life striptease's Golden Age, the years between the Jazz Age and the Sexual Revolution, when strippers performed around the country, in burlesque theatres, nightclubs, vaudeville houses, carnivals, fairs, and even in glorious palaces on the Great White Way. Taking us behind the scenes, Shteir introduces us to a diverse cast of characters that collided on the burlesque stage, from tight-laced political reformers and flamboyant impresarios, to drag queens, shimmy girls, cootch dancers, tit serenaders, and even girls next door, lured into the profession by big-city aspirations. Throughout the book, readers will find essential profiles of famed performers, including Gypsy Rose Lee, 'the Literary Stripper'; Lili St. Cyr, the 1950s mistress of exotic striptease; and Blaze Starr, the 'human heat wave'. who literally set the stage on fire. striptease is an insightful and entertaining portrait of an art form at once reviled and embraced by the American public. Blending careful research and vivid narration, Rachel Shteir captures striptease's combination of sham and seduction while illuminating its surprisingly persistent hold on the American imagination.

  • Psychological Injuries: Forensic Assessment, Treatment, and Law

    Human emotional suffering has been studied for centuries, but the significance of psychological injuries within legal contexts has only recently been recognized. As the public becomes increasingly aware of the ways in which mental health affects physical - and financial - well-being, psychological injuries comprise a rapidly growing set of personal injury insurance claims. Although the diverse range of problems that people claim to suffer from are serious and often genuine, the largely subjective and unobservable nature of psychological conditions has led to much skepticism about the authenticity of psychological injury claims. Improved assessment methods and research on the economic and physical health consequences of psychological distress has resulted in exponential growth in the litigation related to such conditions. Integrating the history of psychological injuries both from legal and mental health perspectives, this book offers compelling discussions of relevant statutory and case law. Focussing especially on posttraumatic stress disorder, it addresses the current status and empirical limitations of forensic assessments of psychological injuries and alerts readers to common vulnerabilities in expert evidence from mental health professionals. In addition, it also uses the latest empirical research to provide the best forensic methods for assessing both clinical conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder and for alternative explanations such as malingering. The authors offer state-of-the-art information on early intervention, psychological therapies, and pharmaceutical treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder and stimulating suggestions for further research into this complex phenomenon. A comprehensive guide to psychological injuries, this book will be an indispensable resource for all mental health practitioners, researchers, and legal professionals who work with psychological injuries.

  • Introduction To Mixed-Signal IC Test and Measurement

    Integrated circuits incorporating both digital and analog functions have become increasingly prevalent in the semiconductor industry. Mixed-signal IC test and measurement has grown into a highly specialized field of electrical engineering. It has become harder to hire and train new engineers to become skilled mixed-signal test engineers. The slow learning curve for mixed-signal test engineers is largely due to the shortage of written materials and university-level courses on the subject of mixed-signal testing. While many books have been devoted to the subject of digital test and testability, the same cannot be said for analog and mixed-signal automated test and measurement. This book was written in response ot the shortage of basic course material for mixed-signa test and measurement. The book assumes a solid background in analog and digital circuits as well as a working knowledge of computers and computer programming. A background in digital signal processing and statistical analysis is also helpful, though not absolutely necessary. This material is desinged to be useful as both a university textbook and as a reference manual for the beginning professional test engineer. The prerequisite for this book is a junior level course in linear continuous-time and discrete-time systems, as well as exposure ot elementary probability and statistical concepts. Chapter 1 presents an introduction to the context in which mixed-singal testing is performed and why it is necessary. Chapter 2 examines the process by which test programs are generated, from device data sheet to test plan to test code. Test program structure and functionality are also discussed in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 introduces basic DC measurement definitions, including continuity, leakage, offset, gain, DC power supply rejection ratio, and many other types of fundamental DC measurements. Chapter 4 covers the basics of absolute accuracy, resolution, software calibration, standards traceability, and measurement repeatability. In addition, basic data analysis is presented in Chapter 4. A more thorough treatment of data analysis and statistical analysis is delayed until Chapter 15. Chapter 5 takes a closer look at the architecture of a generic mixed-signal ATE tester. The generic tester includes instruments such as DC sources, meters, waveform digitizers, arbitrary waveform generators, and digital pattern generators with source and capture functionality. Chapter 6 presents an introduction to both ADC and DAC sampling theory. DAC sampling theory is applicable to both DAC circuits in the device under test and to the arbitrary waveform generators in a mixed-signal tester. ADC sampling theory is applicable to both ADC circuits in the device under test and to waveform digitizers in a mixed-signal tester. Coherent multi-tone sample sets are also introduced as an introduction to DSP based testing. Chapter 7 further develops sampling theory concepts and DSP-based testing methodologies, which are at the core of many mixed-signal test and measurement techniques. FFT fundamentals, windowing, frequency domain filtering, and other DSP-based testing fundamentals are covered in Chapter 6 and 7. Chapter 8 shows how basic AC channel tests can be performed economicaly using DSP-based testing. This chapter covers only non-sampled channels, consisting of combinations of op-amps, analog filters, PGAs and other continuous-time circuits. Chapter 9 explores many of these same tests as they are applied to sampled channels, which include DACs, ADCs, sample and hold (S/H) amplifiers, etc. Chapter 10 explains how the basic accuracy of ATE test equipment can be extended using specialized software routines. This subject is not necessarily taught in formal ATE tester classes, yet it is critical in the accurate measurement of many DUT performance parameters. Testing of DACs is covered in Chapter 11. Several kinds of DACs are studied, including traditional binary-weighted, resistive ladder, pulse with modulation (PWM), and sigma delta architectures. Traditional measurements like INL, DNL and absolute error are discussed. Chapter 12 builds upon the concepts in Chapter 11 to show how ADCs are commonly tested. Again, several different kinds of ADC's are studied, including binary-weighted, dual-slope, flash, semi-flash, and sigma-delta architectures. The weaknesses of each design are expalined, as well as the common methodologies used to probe their weaknesses. Chapter 13 explores the gray art of mixed-signal DIB design. Topics of interest include component selection, power and ground layout, crosstalk, shielding, transmission lines, and tester loading. Chapter 13 also illustrates several common DIB circuits and their use in mixed-signal testing. Chapter 14 gives a brief introduction to some of the techniques for analog and mixed-signal design for test. There are fewer structured approaches for mixed-signal DfT than for purely digital DfT. The more common ad-hoc methods are explained, as well as some of the industry standards such as IEEE Std. 1149.1 and 1149.4. A brief review of statistical analysis and Gaussian distributions is presented in Chapter 15. This chapter also shows how measurement results can be analyzed and viewed using a variety of software tools and display formats. Datalogs, shmoo plots, and histograms are discussed. Also, statistical process control (SPC) is explained, including a discussion of process control metrics such as Cp and Cpk. Chapter 16 examines the economis of production testing, The economics of testing are affected by many factors such as equipment purchase price, test floor overhead costs, test time, dual-head testing, multi-site testing, and time to market. A test engineer's debugging skills heavily impacts time to market. Chapter 16 examines the test debugging process to attempt to set down some general guidelines for debugging mixed-signal test programs. Finally, emerging trends that affect test economics and test development time are presented in Chapter 16. Some or all these trends will shape the future course of mixed-siganl test and measurement.

  • In Defense of Globalization: With a New Afterword

    In the passionate debate that currently rages over globalization, critics have been heard blaming it for a host of ills afflicting poorer nations, everything from child labor to environmental degradation and cultural homogenization. Now Jagdish Bhagwati, the internationally renowned economist, takes on the critics, revealing that globalization, when properly governed, is in fact the most powerful force for social good in the world today. Drawing on his unparalleled knowledge of international and development economics, Bhagwati explains why the "gotcha" examples of the critics are often not as compelling as they seem. With the wit and wisdom for which he is renowned, Bhagwati convincingly shows that globalization is part of the solution, not part of the problem. This edition features a new afterword by the author, in which he counters recent writings by prominent journalist Thomas Friedman and the Nobel Laureate economist Paul Samuelson and argues that current anxieties about the economic implications of globalization are just as unfounded as were the concerns about its social effects.

  • We Are Poor but So Many: The Story of Self-Employed Women in India

    This book is a first-hand account of the vision, rise, and success of SEWA, the Self-Employed Women's Association, a trade union of self-employed women in India. It takes the reader into an up-close look at these women's daily lives, at the forces that overpower them, the conditions that perpetuate their poverty, the battles they fight, the attitudes they face and the working and living conditions of both rural and urban working women. It highlights the role that trade cooperatives play in economic development and shows the impact of the larger economy on the lives of the women.

  • A Passion for Justice: J. Waties Waring and Civil Rights

    An eighth-generation Charlestonian with a prestigious address, impeccable social credentials, and years of intimate association with segregationist politicians, U.S. District Court Judge Julius Waties Waring shocked family, friends, and an entire state in 1945 when, at age sixty-five, he divorced his wife of more than thirty years and embarked upon a far-reaching challenge to the most fundamental racial values of his native region. The first jurist in modern times to declare segregated schooling "inequality per se," Waring also ordered the equalization of teachers' salaries and outlawed South Carolina's white primary. Off the bench, he and his second wife--a twice-divorced, politically liberal Northerner who was even more outspoken in her political views than Waring himself--castigated Dixiecrats and southern liberals alike for their defense of segregation, condemned the "sickness" of white southern society, urged a complete breakdown of state-enforced bars to racial intermingling, and entertained blacks in their home, becoming pariahs in South Carolina and controversial figures nationally. Tinsley Yarbrough examines the life and career of this fascinating but neglected jurist, assessing the controversy he generated, his place in the early history of the modern civil rights movement, and the forces motivating his repudiation of his past.

  • Making Public Places Safer: Surveillance and Crime Prevention

    The United Kingdom has more than 4.2 million public closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras--one for every fourteen citizens. Across the United States, hundreds of video surveillance systems are being installed in town centers, public transportation facilities, and schools at a cost exceeding $100 million annually. And now other Western countries have begun to experiment with CCTV to prevent crime in public places. In light of this expansion and the associated public expenditure, as well as pressing concerns about privacy rights, there is an acute need for an evidence-based approach to inform policy and practice. Drawing on the highest-quality research, criminologists Brandon C. Welsh and David P. Farrington assess the effectiveness and social costs of not only CCTV, but also of other important surveillance methods to prevent crime in public space, such as improved street lighting, security guards, place managers, and defensible space. Importantly, the book goes beyond the question of "Does it work?" and examines the specific conditions and contexts under which these surveillance methods may have an effect on crime as well as the mechanisms that bring about a reduction in crime. At a time when cities need cost-effective methods to fight crime and the public gradually awakens to the burdens of sacrificing their privacy and civil rights for security, Welsh and Farrington provide this timely and reliable guide to the most effective and non-invasive uses of surveillance to make public places safer from crime.

  • The Richard Rodgers Reader

    Richard Rodgers was one of America's most prolific and best-loved composers. A world without "My Funny Valentine," "The Lady is a Tramp," "Blue Moon," and "Bewitched," to name just a few of the songs he wrote with Lorenz Hart, is scarcely imaginable, and the musicals he wrote with his second collaborator, Oscar Hammerstein--Oklahoma!, Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I, and The Sound of Music--continue to enchant and entertain audiences. Arranged in four sections, Rodgers and Hart (1929-1943), Rodgers and Hammerstein (1943-1960), Rodgers After Hammerstein (1960-1979), and The Composer Speaks (1939-1971), The Richard Rodgers Reader offers a cornucopia of informative, perceptive, and stylish biographical and critical overviews. It also contains a selection of Rodgers's letters to his wife Dorothy in the 1920s, the 1938 Time magazine cover story and New Yorker profiles in 1938 and 1961, and essays and reviews by such noted critics as Brooks Atkinson, Eric Bentley, Leonard Bernstein, Lehman Engel, Walter Kerr, Ken Mandelbaum, Ethan Mordden, George Jean Nathan, and Alec Wilder. The volume features personal accounts by Richard Adler, Agnes de Mille, Joshua Logan, Mary Martin, and Diahann Carroll. The collection concludes with complete selections from more than thirty years of Rodgers's own writings on topics ranging from the creative process, the state of the Broadway theater, even Rodgers's bout with cancer, and a generous sample from the candid and previously unpublished Columbia University interviews. For anyone wishing to explore more fully the life and work of a composer whose songs and musicals have assumed a permanent--and prominent--place in American popular culture, The Richard Rodgers Reader will offer endless delights.

  • Perspectives on the Face

    Our faces play essential roles in defining us as individuals. They are the most immediately identifiable parts of our bodies. We use our faces to communicate emotions and to interact socially. Sometimes, despite our intentions, our faces reveal our thoughts even when we do not speak. In several medical conditions, the facial aspect confirms diagnosis, and while surgical alteration of craniofacial anomalies can do much to normalize appearance, patients are always confronted with the question of what is normal, and with the fact that beauty itself may be nothing more than a culturally determined concept. This book explores a range of distinct yet related perspectives on the face--the evolutionary, the developmental, the anatomic, the dysmorphic and genetic, the surgical, the psychological; the sociocultural, and the artistic. As a cross-disciplinary study, it is the first to comprehensively address the question of what constitutes a face, and to span the gap between symbolic interpretation and scientific fact. Both broadly informative and in-depth in its discussions, this highly readable book will be of interest to biologists, geneticists, plastic surgeons, craniofacial surgeons, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, psychologists, sociologists, anthropologists, and others with a special interest in the face.

  • Solutions for Singers: Tools for Every Performer and Teacher

    Internationally recognized master teacher Richard Miller offers solutions to more than 200 significant questions on voice technique and performance, culled from hundreds of masterclasses and pedagogy courses. In this pragmatic guide for securing technique and artistry, Miller deals directly with problems faced by established professional performers, studio teachers, and students of singing, avoiding abstract generalities. The question-and-answer pairs are organized under 10 broad topic headings that constitute singers' most important concerns.

  • Music in Egypt: Includes CD

    The Music in the Middle East: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture is a case study in the Global Music series, edited by Bonnie Wade and Patricia Campbell. This book focuses on the variety of music that fill the eastern Arab world, with special focus on musics found in modern day Egypt. Based on his extensive fieldwork, Marcus introduces the features that unify much of Middle Eastern music. The book highlights the dynamic nature of Middle Eastern music culture and also explores the impact of modernization and westernization on musical culture as well as music's role in helping to create a regional, national, and community identity. The three themes focused upon are the concepts of melodic and rhythmic music that underlie the art, folk and popular styles of the region, the deep interrelationship between Islam and music and Westernization and modernization. Concentrating on the performer musician and the fieldworker, this book provides an intimate sense of the fabric of the music itself and of aspects of the culturalcontext of music in present day Egypt.

  • Understanding Capitalism: Competition, Command, and Change

    Understanding Capitalism provides an introduction to economics with extensive attention to the global economy, inequality, the information revolution, the exercise of power and the historical evolution of economic institutions and individual preferences. Its three dimensional approach focuses on competition in markets, command in firms, governments and international relations, and change as a permanent feature of a capitalist economy promoted by technical innovation and conflict over the distribution of income.

  • Epidemiologic Methods: Studying The Occurrence Of Illness

    This second edition of Epidemiologic Methods offers a rigorous introduction to the concepts and tools of epidemiologic research. Aimed chiefly at future epidemiologists, the book offers clear descriptions, practical examples, and question/answer sections for each of the science's key concepts. Authored by two award-winning epidemiology instructors, this book is ideally suited for use as a text in a graduate-level course sequence in epidemiologic methods. The book's chapters are organized around three main themes: general concepts and tools of epidemiology; major study designs; and special topics, including screening, outbreak investigations, and use of epidemiology to evaluate policies and programs. With addition exercises at the end of each chapter and expanded attention to topics such as confounding, this new edition of Epidemiologic Methods is an indispensable resource for the next generation of epidemiologic study.

  • Love Thy Neighbour As Thyself

    This brief and stimulating work is based on the prestigious Gifford Lectures, which Lenn Goodman was invited to deliver in 2005. Goodman was asked to speak about the commandment to 'love thy neighbour as thyself' from the standpoint of Judaism, a topic and perspective that have not often been joined before.

  • Visionary Film: The American Avant-Garde, 1943-2000

    Visionary Film has remained the standard text on the American avant-garde since the publication of its first edition in 1974. It has been hailed as the most complete work written on the exciting, often puzzling and always controversial genre of American avant-garde film. In this book P. Adams Sitney discusses the principle genres and the major filmmakers since Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid made their dreamlike film "Meshes of the Afternoon" in 1943. Sitney also identifies the emergence and flowering of a new genre, which he calls Menippean Satire. This edition also includes a chapter on the films of Gregory J. Markopoulos which had been dropped from the second edition.

  • A Compendium of Neuropsychological Tests: Administration, Norms, and Commentary

    For the practicing neuropsychologist or researcher, keeping up with the sheer number of newly published or updated neuropsychological tests is a challenge, as is evaluating the utility and psychometric properties of each test in a clinical context. The goal of the thrid edition of A Compendium of Neuropsychological Tests, a well-established neuropsychology reference text, is twofold. First, the Compendium is intended to serve as a guidebook that provides a comprehensive overview of the essential aspects of neuropsychological assessment practice. Second, it is intended as a sourcebook of critical reviews of major neuropsychological assessment tools for the use of practicing clinicians and researchers. Written in an easy-to-read reference format, and based on exhaustive reviews of research literature in neuropsychology, neurology, psychology and related disciplines, the book covers topics such as basic aspects of neuropsychological assessment as well as the theoretical background, norms and the utility, reliability and validity of neuropsychological tests. For this thrid edition, all chapters have been extensively revised and updated. The text has been considerably expanded to provide a practical overview of the state of the field. Two new chapters have been added: "Psychometrics in neuropsychological assessment" and "Norms in neuropsychological assessment". The first two chapters present basic psychometric concepts and principles. Chapters three and four consider practical aspects of the history-taking interview and the assessment process itself. Chapter five provides guidelines on report writing. Chapters six through sixteen consist of detailed, critical reviews of specific neuropsychological tests, and address the topics of intelligence, achievement, executive function, attention, memory, language, visual perception, somatosensory and olfactory function, mood/personality and response bias. A unique feature is the inclusion of tables that summarise salient features of tests wihtin each domain so that readers can easily compare measures. Additional tables within each test review present important features of each test, highlight aspects of each normative database, and provide an overview of psychometric properties. Of interest to neuropsychologists, neurologists, psychiatrists and educational and clinical psychologists working with adults as well as with paediatric populations, this volume will aid practitioners in selecting appropriate testing measures for their patients, and will provide them with the knowledge needed to arrive at empirically supported interpretations of test results.

  • Michael Polanyi: Scientist and Philosopher

    Michael Polanyi was one of the great figures of European intellectual life in the 20th century. A highly acclaimed physical chemist in the first period of his career who became a celebrated philosopher after World War II, Polanyi taught in Germany, England, and the United States and associated with many of the leading intellects of his time. His biography has remained unwritten partly because his many and scattered interests in a wide variety of fields, including six subfields of physical chemistry, epistemology, economics, patent law, social and political theory, aesthetics, and theology. This long-awaited volume will be the definitive resource on Polanyi and his work.

  • The Resilient City: How Modern Cities Recover from Disaster

    In 1871, the city of Chicago was almost entirely destroyed by what became known as The Great Fire. Thirty-five years later, San Francisco lay in smoldering ruins after the catastrophic earthquake of 1906. Or consider the case of the Jerusalem, the greatest site of physical destruction and renewal in history, which, over three millennia, has suffered wars, earthquakes, fires, twenty sieges, eighteen reconstructions, and at least eleven transitions from one religious faith to another. Yet this ancient city has regenerated itself time and again, and still endures. Throughout history, cities have been sacked, burned, torched, bombed, flooded, besieged, and leveled. And yet they almost always rise from the ashes to rebuild. Viewing a wide array of urban disasters in global historical perspective, The Resilient City traces the aftermath of such cataclysms as: -the British invasion of Washington in 1814 -the devastation wrought on Berlin, Warsaw, and Tokyo during World War II -the late-20th century earthquakes that shattered Mexico City and the Chinese city of Tangshan -Los Angeles after the 1992 riots -the Oklahoma City bombing -the destruction of the World Trade Center Revealing how traumatized city-dwellers consistently develop narratives of resilience and how the pragmatic process of urban recovery is always fueled by highly symbolic actions, The Resilient City offers a deeply informative and unsentimental tribute to the dogged persistence of the city, and indeed of the human spirit.

  • Oh Joy! Oh Rapture!: The Enduring Phenomenon of Gilbert and Sullivan

    In Oh Joy! Oh Rapture! expert and enthusiast Ian Bradley explores the world of Gilbert and Sullivan over the last four and a half decades, looking at the way this "phenomenon" is passed from generation to generation. Taking as his starting point the expiry of copyright on the opera libretti at the end of 1961 and using fascinating hitherto unpublished archive material, Bradley reveals the extraordinary story of the last years of the old D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, the guardian of Savoy tradition for over a hundred years, and the troubled history of its successor. He explores the rich vein of parodies, spoofs, and spin-offs of the songs, as well as their influence on twentieth century lyricists and composers. He analyzes professional productions across the world, looks at the unique place of G&S in schools, colleges, and universities, and lovingly explores the culture of amateur performance. He also uncovers the largely male world of the obsessive fans, those collecting memorabilia, the myriad magazines, journals, websites, and festivals devoted to G&S, and the arcane interests of some of the faithful "inner brotherhood."

  • Perceptual Expertise: Bridging Brain and Behavior

    This book presents a comprehensive survey of perceptual expertise in visual object recognition, and introduces a novel collaborative model, codified as the "Perceptual Expertise Network" (PEN). This unique group effort is focused on delineating the domain-general principles of high-level visual learning that can account for how different object categories are processed and come to be associated with spatially localized activity in the primate brain. PEN's approach brings together different traditions and techniques to address questions such as how expertise develops, whether there are different kinds of experts, whether some disorders such as autism or prosopagnosia can be understood as a lack or loss of expertise, and how conceptual and perceptual information interact when experts recognize and categorize objects. The research and results that have been generated by these questions are presented here, along with a variety of other questions, background information, and extant issues that have emerged from recent studies, making this book a complete overview on the topic.

  • School Violence in Context: Culture, Neighborhood, Family, School, and Gender

    Images, threats, and experiences of political violence daily confront school children in the Middle East. Previous studies into school violence, which sought to forge a strong connection between the external environment and the level of violence in schools, would lead us to believe that political violence is a leading cause of school violence. Here, though, Benbenishty and Astor making striking use the geopolitical climate of the Middle East to model school violence in terms of its context within as well as outside of the school site. The book's approach is unique in that the authors use empirical data to show which variables and factors are similar across different cultures and which variables appear unique to different cultures. This empirical contrast of universal with culturally specific patterns is sorely needed in the school violence literature. Crucially, the authors expand the paradigm of understanding school violence to encompass the intersection of cultural, ethnic, neighborhood, and family characteristics with intra-school factors such as teacher-student dynamics, anti-violence policies, student participation, grade level, and religious and gender divisions. It is only by understanding the multiple contexts of school violence, the authors argue, that truly effective prevention programs, interventions, research agendas, and policies can be implemented. Drawing on the only major study ever conducted comparing Jewish and Arab-Israeli students, in conjunction with census and police data on neighborhood characteristics, Astor and Benbenishty explore and differentiate the many manifestations of victimization in schools, providing a new model for understanding school violence. Their innovative research maps the contours of verbal, social, physical, and sexual victimization as well as weapons possession, presenting some startling findings along the way. When comparing schools in Israel with schools in California, the authors demonstrate for the first time that for the most violent events the pattern of violent behaviors have strong cultural influences. They reveal, for example, how Arab boys encounter much more boy-to-boy sexual harassment than their Jewish peers, and that teacher-initiated victimization of students constitutes a significant and often overlooked type of school violence.

  • A Vanished World: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Medieval Spain

    Are Muslims, Christians, and Jews forever locked in a cycle of violence and resentment? Chris Lowney engages these questions by chronicling medieval Spain's impossibly panoramic history.

  • Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture

    What kind of animals are human beings? And how do our visions of the human shape our theories of social action and institutions? In Moral, Believing Animals, Christian Smith offers innovative, challenging answers to these and other fundamental questions in sociological, cultural, and religious theory. Smith's work is based on the assumption (unfashionable in certain circles) that human beings have an identifiable and peculiar set of capacities and proclivities that distinguishes them significantly from other animals on this planet. Smith argues that all people are at bottom believers, whose lives, actions, and institutions are constituted, motivated, and governed by narrative traditions and moral orders on which they inescapably depend. This approach - which has profound consequences for how we think about knowledge, culture, social action, institutions, religion, and the task of social sciences - will be of interest to scholars in sociology, social theory, religious and cultural studies, psychology, and anthropology.

  • The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works: An Essay in the Philosophy of Music

    What is involved in the composition, performance, and reception of classical music? What are we doing when we listen to this music seriously? Why when playing a Beethoven sonata do performers begin with the first note indicated in the score; why don't they feel free to improvise around the sonata's central theme? Why, finally, does it go against tradition for an audience at a concert of classical music to tap its feet? Bound up in these questions is the overriding question of what it means philosophically, musically, and historically for musicians to speak about music in terms of "works". In this book, Lydia Goehr describes how the concept of a musical work fully crystallized around 1800, and subsequently defined the norms, expectations, and behavioral patterns that have come to characterize classical musical practice. The description is set in the context of a more general philosophical account of the rise and fall of concepts and ideals, and of their normative functions; at the same time, debates amongst conductors, early-music performers, and avant-gardists are addressed. The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works is a seminal work of scholarship, and has appeared in an astonishing variety of contexts and disciplines from musicological and philosophical since its initial publication. This second edition features a new Introductory Essay by the author, discussing the genesis of her groundbreaking thesis, how her subsequent work has followed and developed similar themes, and how criticisms along the way have informed not only her own work but the "Imaginary Museum" concept more generally as it spread across disciplinary lines. A provocative foreword by Richard Taruskin contextualizes Goehr's argument and points to its continuing centrality to the field.

  • Psychiatry in Long-Term Care

    As the baby boom generation ages, the number of people requiring long-term care will grow dramatically in developed nations. A majority of them will become increasingly frail and suffer from dementia and associated neuropsychiatric symptoms. Against this backdrop, Psychiatry in Long-Term Care, Second Edition (first published under the title Psychiatric Care in the Nursing Home) comprehensively reviews the present state of knowledge on how to identify the major psychiatric disorders affecting residents of long-term care facilities and how to intervene. Edited and written by some of the world's foremost authorities, the book provides in-depth coverage of topics such as these: - General approaches to assessment and treatment of behavioral disturbances - Depression - Anxiety - Dementia - Sleep impairment - Psychosis - Substance use disorders - Contemporary strategies for successful psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions Complementing these chapters with clinical guidelines on specific disorders are chapters on medicolegal considerations, ethics, and education of care staff. The new edition is an important resource for care providers from all disciplines devoted to improving the well being of people in long-term care facilities and for students and scholars of mental health and aging.

  • The Bible As Literature: An Introduction

    This comprehensive and systematic text approaches the Bible from a literary/historical perspective and studies it as a body of writing produced by real people who intended to convey messages to real audiences. Avoiding assessments of the Bible's truth or authority, the authors maintain a rigorously objective tone as they discuss such major issues as the forms and strategies of biblical writing, its actual historical and physical settings, the process of canon formation, the sources of the Pentateuch, and the nature of such biblical genres as prophecy, apocalypse, and gospel. In this edition, David Citino has joined the team of authors, and the new edition includes a new chapter on "Women in the Bible," by contributor Nicola Denzey, and a new appendix on modern approaches to the bible. The new edition also features new maps, timelines, expanded bibliographies, and updated material throughout.

  • Eight Theories of Religion

    Eight Theories of Religion offers summary, analysis, and appraisal of a number of landmark modern efforts to explain the origin and function of religion. Beginning in the middle decades of the nineteenth century, it considers the Victorian anthropology of E.B. Tylor and James Frazer, the "reductionist" social science of Sigmund Freud, Emile Durkheim, and Karl Marx, the non-reductionist approaches of Max Weber and Mircea Eliade, and the alternatice paradigms that have arisen from the fieldwork of E.E. Evans-Pritchard and the interpretive sociology of Clifford Geertz. The book is ideal for use as a supplementary text in introductory religion courses or as the main text in theory and sociology of religion courses.

  • Cardiac Development

    This is the only in-depth, single author survey of heart development. It will provide a more systematic, up-to-date synthesis of the subject than any other volume, spanning the range from classical anatomical studies to recent findings in molecular biology. It also covers topics that are often omitted from discussions of heart development, such as myocardial function, cardiac innervation, and conduction development and clinical correlates will be discussed throughout. The book is beautifully illustrated by Karen Waldo, an artist who has collaborated with Dr. Kirby for many years.

  • Solution-Focused Treatment of Domestic Violence Offenders

    Every fifteen seconds someone commits a crime of domestic violence in the United States, and most violators will be court-mandated to receive group treatment. Outcome studies of traditional treatment programs (those with confrontational or educational approaches) indicate high rates of dropping out and low effectiveness, lending urgency to the need to find an alternative method. This book describes a cutting-edge treatment approach that creates effective, positive changes in domestic violence offenders. Solution-focused therapy focuses on holding offenders accountable and responsible for building solutions, rather than emphasizing their problems and deficits. By focusing on "solution-talk" instead of "problem-talk," clients are assisted in developing useful goals and solution behaviors that are then amplified, supported, and reinforced through a solution-building process. The book will be of great interest to professionals and graduate students in social work, psychology, and counseling.

  • Tacitus' Annals

    Tacitus' Annals is the central historical source for first-century C.E. Rome. It is prized by historians since it provides the best narrative material for the reigns of Tiberius, Claudius, and Nero, as well as a probing analysis of the imperial system of government. But the Annals should be seen as far more than an historical source, a mere mine for the reconstruction of the facts of Roman history. While the Annals is a superb work of history, it has also become a central text in the western literary, political, and even philosophical traditions - from the Renaissance to the French and American revolutions, and beyond. This volume attempts to enhance the reader's understanding of how this book of history could have such a profound effect. Chapters will address the purpose, form, and method of Roman historical writing, the ethnic biases of Tacitus, and his use of sources. Since Tacitus has been regarded as one of the first analysts of the psychopathology of political life, the book will examine the emperors, the women of the court, and the ambitious entourage of freedmen and intellectuals who surround every Roman ruler. The final chapter will examine the impact of Tacitus' Annals since their rediscovery by Boccaccio in the 14th century.

  • Simple Logic

    Written by an accomplished teacher, scholar, and writer, Simple Logic is unique in its sensitivity to today's student audience; it provides philosophical writing samples that are of interest and relevance to students' lives. Daniel Bonevac's clear writing style and careful presentation helps students to easily understand key concepts, terms, and examples. He features a multitude of interesting and relevant examples drawn from literary texts and contemporary culture, including figures as varied as Voltaire, Confucius, and Bart Simpson. Simple Logic succeeds in conveying the standard topics in introductory logic with easy-to-understand explanations of rules and methods, while concentrating the discussion on fundamental topics taught by the majority of logic instructors.

  • The Death of Truth: Thomas S. Kuhn and the Evolution of Ideas

    Thomas S. Kuhn wrote The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, one of the most influential books of the 20th century, a work which sold more than a million copies, changed the way we think about the evolution of ideas--especially scientific ideas--and raised doubts about the long-term survival of even our most cherished scientific concepts. In The Death of Truth, Keay Davidson paints a vivid picture of Kuhn's troubled career and personal life, as well as a vibrant account of the intellectual and cultural climate in which Kuhn worked. Drawing on direct access to family members and colleagues as well as his subject's private papers, Davidson sheds light on Kuhn's personal life, including the brilliant family eccentrics who influenced his work; his troubled emotional and family life; his oft-combative relations with colleagues and critics; and his maddeningly erratic comments on the shocking implications of his theories. The book also provides an engaging picture of the intellectual and cultural world in which Kuhn's ideas evolved, including the nasty battles over logical positivism and the widespread disillusionment with science during an era of high-tech war, nuclear weapons, environmental ruin, and ruthless industrial globalization. Along the way, Davidson ranges from the battlefields of World War II to the academic squabbles of Harvard, Berkeley, Princeton, and MIT, and offers fascinating glimpses of eminent thinkers such as Kuhn's famous foe Karl Popper, philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, positivist crusader A.J. Ayer, the flamboyant "anarchist" Paul K. Feyerabend, and many others. The Death of Truth is the first full-length portrait of a truly revolutionary thinker--a strange, troubled man who abandoned a brilliant career to challenge science's most dogmatic assumptions.

  • 100 Decisive Battles: From Ancient Times to the Present

    From the ancient Egyptian battle at Megiddo in 1469 BC to the recent military actions in Iraq, great battles have had an enormous impact on the shaping of history. Now, in this fully illustrated book, one hundred of the world's most important military confrontations are described in detail. 100 Decisive Battles gives us the facts about the battle and also explains where it fits in to the scope of world history.

    In each entry we are given the name and date of the battle, the commanders, the size of the opposing forces, and casualties. An account of the battle plan and the military action are strategically discussed, and each description closes with a valuable consideration of how history was affected by the outcome of the conflict. Among the battles presented are the Battle of Thymbra (546 BC), the Battle of Chalons (451 AD), the Battle of Cajamarca (1532), the Battle of Dien Bien Phu (1954), and the Tet Offensive (1968). Accompanying maps and sidebars help further orient us with each military action.

    Global in scope, with excellent coverage of American, Central American, European, Asian, and Middle Eastern battles, and with its stirring accounts of familiar battles and many lesser known military conflicts, 100 Decisive Battles is essential reading for military buffs and anyone interested in how the modern world came to be.

  • A Life Worth Living: Contributions to positive psychology

    A Life Worth Living brings together the latest thought on positive psychology from an international cast of scholars. It includes historical, philosophical, and empirical reviews of what psychologists have found to matter for personal happiness and well-being. The contributions to this volume agree on principles of optimal development that start from purely material and selfish concerns, but then lead to ever broader circles of responsibility embracing the goals of others and the well-being of the environment; on the importance of spirituality; on the development of strengths specific to the individual. Rather than material success, popularity, or power, the investigations reported in this volume suggest that personally constructed goals, intrinsic motivation, and a sense of autonomy are much more important. The chapters indicate that hardship and suffering do not necessarily make us unhappy, and they suggest therapeutical implications for improving the quality of life. Specific topics covered include the formation of optimal childhood values and habits as well as a new perspective on aging. This volume provides a powerful counterpoint to a mistakenly reductionist psychology. They show that subjective experience can be studied scientifically and measured accurately. They highlight the potentiality for autonomy and freedom that is among the most precious elements of the human condition. Moreover, they make a convincing case for the importance of subjective phenomena, which often affect happiness more than external, material conditions. After long decades during which psychologists seemed to have forgotten that misery is not the only option, the blossoming of Positive Psychology promises a better understanding of what a vigorous, meaningful life may consist of.

  • Biomedical Ethics

    Biomedical Ethics is a brief philosophical introduction to the most important ethical questions and arguments in six areas of biomedicine: the patient-doctor relationship; medical research on humans; reproductive rights and technologies; genetics; medical decisions at the end of life; and the allocation of scarce medical resources. The topics cover both perennial ethical issues in medicine, such as doctors' duties to patients, and recent and emerging ethical issues in scientific innovation, such as gene therapy and cloning. The scope of the book captures the historical, contemporary, and future-oriented flavor of these areas in a concise and accessible way, and is ideal for courses in contemporary moral problems, introduction to ethics, and introduction to bioethics.

  • Building Trust: In Business, Politics, Relationships, and Life

    In business, politics, marriage, indeed in any significant relationship, trust is the essential precondition upon which all real success depends. But what, precisely, is trust? How can it be achieved and sustained? And, most importantly, how can it be regained once it has been broken? In Building Trust, Robert C. Solomon and Fernando Flores offer compelling answers to these questions. They argue that trust is not something that simply exists from the beginning, something we can assume or take for granted; that it is not a static quality or "social glue." Instead, they assert that trust is an emotional skill, an active and dynamic part of our lives that we build and sustain with our promises and commitments, our emotions and integrity. In looking closely at the effects of mistrust, such as insidious office politics that can sabotage a company's efficiency, Solomon and Flores demonstrate how to move from naive trust that is easily shattered to an authentic trust that is sophisticated, reflective, and possible to renew. As the global economy makes us more and more reliant on "strangers," and as our political and personal interactions become more complex, Building Trust offers invaluable insight into a vital aspect of human relationships.

  • Criminal Law (Oxford Introductions to U.S. Law)

    Many controversies in American criminal law reflect the tension between older and newer conceptions of the purposes of punishment. The English common law of crimes was centrally concerned with suppressing vengeance and asserting royal authority. Thus it enforced a royal peace by conditioning punishment on unauthorized force and harm to particular victims. The development of American criminal law has been the story of the emergence of this utilitarianism of criminal offending as the imposition of risk or the violation of consent, combined with culpability. This conception is reflected in the Model Penal Code and many state codes. Yet understanding contemporary criminal law requires that we also remember the model of offending as trespass against sovereignty out of which it emerged. In The Oxford Introductions to U.S. Law: Criminal Law, Guyora Binder reviews the development of American criminal law and explains its key concepts and persistent controversies in light of its history. These key concepts include retribution and prevention as purposes of punishment; the requirements of a criminal act and a culpable mental state; criteria of causal responsibility; modes of violating consent; doctrines of attribution of liability for incomplete offenses, including attempt, conspiracy and complicity; and defenses of justification and excuse.

  • Bach's Works for Solo Violin: Style, Structure, Performance

    J. S. Bach's sonatas and partitas for solo violin have been central to the violin repertoire since the mid-eighteenth century. This engaging volume is the first comprehensive exploration of the place of these works within Bach's music: it focuses on their structural and stylistic features as they have been perceived since their creation. Joel Lester, a highly regarded scholar, teacher, violinist, and administrator, combines an analytical study, a full historical guide, and an insightful introduction to Bach's style. Individual movements are related to comparable movements by Bach in other media and are differentiated from superficially similar works from later eras. Lester employs descriptions of historical and contemporary recordings, as well as accounts of nineteenth-century performances and commentaries on historical editions, to explore these works as they evolved through the centuries. Wherever possible, he uses analytic tools culled from eighteenth-century ideas, key notions originally developed for the specific purpose of describing the repertoire under consideration. Beginning with an overview of the solo violin music's place within Bach's oeuvre, this study takes the Sonata No. 1 in G minor as the paradigm of Bach's compositional strategy, examining each movement in detail before enlarging the discussion to cover parallel and contrasting features of the A-minor and C-minor sonatas. Next, a chapter is devoted to the three partitas and their roots in various dance-music traditions. The book concludes with a summary of form, style, and rhetoric in Bach's music, in which Lester muses on these masterpieces with an overall command of the music, criticism, and history of the 1700s that is quite rare among scholars. A novel and unprecedented investigation of a particular portion of Bach's accomplishment and a particular aspect of his universal appeal, Bach's Works for Solo Violin will help violinists, students, scholars, and other listeners develop a deeper personal involvement with these wonderful pieces.

  • Central Works in Technical Communication

    Bringing together forty seminal works in technical communication, this collection provides a unique overview of the field. The essays are organized into conceptual categories including history, rhetorical perspectives, philosophies and theories, ethical issues, workplace studies, research methods, and computers. The volume is enhanced by brief updates by the contributors and commentaries by central figures in the field, who describe how one or more of the essays has positively influenced their work.

  • Women Who Fly: Goddesses, Witches, Mystics, and other Airborne Females

    From the asparas of Hindu myth to the swan maidens of European fairy tales, tales of flying women-some with wings, others with clouds, rainbows, floating scarves, or flying horses-reveal both fascination with and ambivalence about female power and sexuality. In Women Who Fly, Serinity Young examines the motif of flying women as it appears in a wide variety of cultures and historical periods, expressed in legends, myths, rituals, sacred narratives, and artistic productions. She covers a wide range of themes, including supernatural women, like the Valkyries, who transport men to immortality; winged goddesses like Iris and the Greek goddess Nike; figures of terror like the Furies, witches, and succubi; the relationship of marriage and freedom; the connections between women, death, and rebirth; dreams about flying and shamanistic journeys; airborne Christian mystics; and wayward women like Lilith and Morgan le Fay. Young also looks at the mythology surrounding real-life female aviators like Amelia Earhart and Hanna Reitsch. Throughout these examples of flying women, Young demonstrates that female power has been inextricably linked with female sexuality and that the desire to control it was and continues to be a pervasive theme in these stories. The relationship between sex and power is most vividly portrayed in the 12th-century Niebelungenlied, in which the proud warrior-queen Brunnhilde loses her great physical strength when she is tricked into losing her virginity. But even in the 20th century the same idea is reflected in the exploits of the comic book character Wonder Woman, who, posits Young, retains her physical strength only because her love for fellow aviator Steve Trevor goes unrequited. The first book to systematically chronicle the figure of the flying woman in myth, literature, and art, Women Who Fly sheds new light on the ways in which women have both influenced and been understood by society and religious traditions around the world.

  • Effective Practices for Children with Autism: Educational and behavior support interventions that work

    With contributors from a variety of disciplines this book presents a critical appraisal of current practice, emphasizing evidence-based procedures. By bringing together a diverse group of authors, the editors have ensured that the vast range of information on interventions for children with autism is thoroughly examined, and that no topic has gone untouched. The book is an essential framework for evaluating educational and treatment procedures, selecting those that are most effective, and their evaluating outcome.

  • What the Face Reveals: Basic and Applied Studies of Spontaneous Expression Using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS)

    While we have known for centuries that facial expressions can reveal what people are thinking and feeling, it is only recently that the face has been studied scientifically for what it can tell us about internal states, social behavior, and psychopathology. Today's widely available, sophisticated measuring systems have allowed us to conduct a wealth of new research on facial behavior that has contributed enormously to our understanding of the relationship between facial expression and human psychology. The chapters in this volume present the state-of-the-art in this research. They address key topics and questions, such as the dynamic and morphological differences between voluntary and involuntary expressions, the relationship between what people show on their faces and what they say they feel, whether it is possible to use facial behavior to draw distinctions among psychiatric populations, and how far research on automating facial measurement has progressed. The book also includes follow-up commentary on all of the original research presented and a concluding integration and critique of all the contributions made by Paul Ekman. As an essential reference for all those working in the area of facial analysis and expression, this volume will be indispensable for a wide range of professionals and students in the fields of psychology, psychiatry, and behavioral medicine.

  • Wrestling with God: Jewish Theological Responses during and after the Holocaust

    This volume presents a wide-ranging selection of Jewish theological responses to the Holocaust. It will be the most complete anthology of its sort, bringing together for the first time: (1) a large sample of ultra-orthodox writings, translated from the Hebrew and Yiddish; (2) a substantial selection of essays by Israeli authors, also translated from the Hebrew; (3) a broad sampling of works written in English by American and European authors. These diverse selections represent virtually every significant theological position that has been articulated by a Jewish thinker in response to the Holocaust. Included are rarely studied responses that were written while the Holocaust was happening.

  • Television and American Culture

    To understand American popular culture, we need to come to grips with the enormous role that television has played in shaping that culture over the past sixty years. In this timely and provocative book, Jason Mittell provides students with a uniquely thorough look at the medium of television. Exploring television at once as a technological medium, an economic system, a facet of democracy, and a part of everyday life, this landmark text uses numerous sidebars and case studies to demonstrate the past, immediate, and far-reaching effects of American culture on television--and television's influence on American culture. Arranged topically, the book provides a broad historical overview of television while also honing in on such finer points as the formal attributes of its various genres and its role in gender and racial identity formation. Replete with examples, this pedagogically rich text includes many end-of-chapter case studies and narratives with suggestions for further reading--and, appropriately, viewing. Illustrations and photographs--primarily DVD grabs--contextualize historical footage and older television programs that may not be familiar to younger students. A multi-disciplinary approach to American television, Television and American Culture is ideal for an array of intermediate undergraduate- and beginning graduate-level courses, including: * Television Criticism * Television & American Culture * Television & Society * Introduction to Media Studies * American Popular Culture * Radio & TV * History of Mass Communication * Broadcasting & Broadcast Programming For more information about this book, including updates, corrections, links, videos, and teaching resources, visit the companion website at http://tvamericanculture.net.

  • Evidence-Based Public Health

    Public health decisions are often based on short-term demands rather than long-term study, and policies and programs are sometimes developed from anecdotal evidence. To enhance evidence-based practice, this book provides practical guidance on how to choose, carry out, and evaluate evidence-based programs and policies in public health settings.

  • Mendelssohn: A Life in Music

    An extraordinary prodigy of Mozartean abilities, Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy was a distinguished composer and conductor, a legendary pianist and organist, and an accomplished painter and classicist. Lionized in his lifetime, he is best remembered today for several staples of the concert hall and for such popular music as "The Wedding March" and "Hark, the Herald Angels Sing." Now, in the first major Mendelssohn biography to appear in decades, R. Larry Todd offers a remarkably fresh account of this musical giant, based upon painstaking research in autograph manuscripts, correspondence, diaries, and paintings. Rejecting the view of the composer as a craftsman of felicitous but sentimental, saccharine works (termed by one critic "moonlight with sugar water"), Todd reexamines the composer's entire oeuvre, including many unpublished and little known works. Here are engaging analyses of Mendelssohn's distinctive masterpieces--the zestful Octet, puckish Midsummer Night's Dream, haunting Hebrides Overtures, and elegiac Violin Concerto in E minor. Todd describes how the composer excelled in understatement and nuance, in subtle, coloristic orchestrations that lent his scores an undeniable freshness and vividness. He also explores Mendelssohn's changing awareness of his religious heritage, Wagner's virulent anti-Semitic attack on Mendelssohn's music, the composer's complex relationship with his sister Fanny Hensel, herself a child prodigy and prolific composer, his avocation as a painter and draughtsman, and his remarkable, polylingual correspondence with the cultural elite of his time. Mendelssohn: A Life offers a masterful blend of biography and musical analysis. Readers will discover many new facets of the familiar but misunderstood composer and gain new perspectives on one of the most formidable musical geniuses of all time.

  • Elements of Electromagnetics: International Edition

    A good understanding of electromagnetics is vital to anyone working with electrical currents. Electromagnetics, electrostatics and magnetostatics are the foundation for microwaves, biomedical imaging and circuit design. Understanding this foundation well is the basis for a successful career in electronics-related fields. Sadiku's Elements of Electromagnetics is designed for the introductory course in electromagnetics for electrical and computer engineering undergraduates. Taking a vectors-first approach, sadiku explains electrostatics, magnetostatics, fields and waves, as well as applications like transmission lines, wave guides and antennas. it provides a balanced presentation of time-varying fields and static fields, preparing students for employment in today's industrial and manufacturing sectors. The text is oriented to student learning. Thoroughly worked-out examples followed by practice exercises in every chapter show students how to use the theory, and how to confirm that they understand it. Numerical methods, including MATLAB programming, and a rigorous understanding of vectro analysis are included in the text so students can analyse situations they encounter in real life and industry. Essential formulas are boxed, and students are encouraged to derive other formulas rather than memorising excessively. it encorporates many helpful pedagogical features including chapter introductions and summaries, and multiple-choice review questions. It motivates student learnign with more than 100 illustrative examples and over 400 figures. This book is accompanied by an Instructor's Solutions Manual and PowerPoint slides of all the figures, for adopters only.

  • The Urban Experience: Economics, Society, and Public Policy

    The Urban Experience provides a fresh approach to the study of metropolitan areas by combining economic principles, social insight, and political realities with an appreciation of public policy to understand how U.S. cities and suburbs function in the 21st century. The book is grounded in the real life experiences of students and their families on the premise that there is a fascination about one's own surroundings. It uses a great deal of historical and comparative data to explore the wide variation in how we experience urban and suburban communities. It addresses the changing role and function of U.S. metropolitan areas in an age of growing global competition and focuses on key contemporary problems facing cities and suburbs. The book introduces analyses from economics, sociology, and political science as useful tools to understand the evolution and current status of the nation's urban areas. It is the hope of the authors that after students have taken a one-semester course using this text they will have a much greater appreciation and understanding of cities and suburbs, allowing them to participate more fully in the communities where they work and live.

  • Hollywood Cartoons: American Animation in Its Golden Age

    In Hollywood Cartoons, Michael Barrier takes us on a glorious guided tour of American animation in the 1930s, '40s, and '50s, to meet the legendary artists and entrepreneurs who created Bugs Bunny, Betty Boop, Mickey Mouse, Wile E. Coyote, Donald Duck, Tom and Jerry, and many other cartoon favorites. Beginning with black-and-white silent cartoons, Barrier offers an insightful account, taking us inside early New York studios and such Hollywood giants as Disney, Warner Bros., and MGM. Barrier excels at illuminating the creative side of animation--revealing how stories are put together, how animators develop a character, how technical innovations enhance the "realism" of cartoons. Here too are colorful portraits of the giants of the field, from Walt and Roy Disney and their animators, to Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera. Based on hundreds of interviews with veteran animators, Hollywood Cartoons gives us the definitive inside look at this colorful era and at the creative process behind these marvelous cartoons. "This definitive depiction of our most American medium will leave all but the most hardened Disnophobe shouting Yabba-Dabba-Doo!"--The Boston Book Review

  • An Introduction to Middle English

    This authoritative survey offers a concise description of Middle English, the language of Chaucer, during the period from 1100 to 1500. Middle English is discussed in relation to both earlier and later stages in the history of English and in regard to other languages with which it came into contact. The book covers the principal features of Middle English spelling, pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary and also introduces Middle English textual studies.

  • Kurt Gödel: Collected Works: Volume III: Unpublished Essays and Lectures

    Kurt Godel (1906 - 1978) was the most outstanding logician of the twentieth century, famous for his hallmark works on the completeness of logic, the incompleteness of number theory, and the consistency of the axiom of choice and the continuum hypothesis. He is also noted for his work on constructivity, the decision problem, and the foundations of computability theory, as well as for the strong individuality of his writings on the philosophy of mathematics. He is less well known for his discovery of unusual cosmological models for Einstein's equations, in theory permitting time travel into the past. The Collected Works is a landmark resource that draws together a lifetime of creative thought and accomplishment. The first two volumes were devoted to Godel's publications in full (both in original and translation), and the third volume featured a wide selection of unpublished articles and lecture texts found in Godel's Nachlass. These long-awaited final two volumes contain Godel's correspondence of logical, philosophical, and scientific interest. Volume IV covers A to G, with H to Z in volume V; in addition, Volume V contains a full inventory of Godel's Nachlass. All volumes include introductory notes that provide extensive explanatory and historical commentary on each body of work, English translations of material originally written in German (some transcribed from the Gabelsberger shorthand), and a complete bibliography of all works cited. Kurt Godel: Collected Works is designed to be useful and accessible to as wide an audience as possible without sacrificing scientific or historical accuracy. The only comprehensive edition of Godel's work available, it will be an essential part of the working library of professionals and students in logic, mathematics, philosophy, history of science, and computer science and all others who wish to be acquainted with one of the great minds of the twentieth century.

  • Advanced Mechanics of Materials

    This is an advanced mechanics of materials textbook dedicated to upper level undergraduate or postgraduate students in mechanical, civil and aeronautical engineering departments. The text covers subject matter generally referred to as advanced mechanics of materials or advanced strength of materials. Unique features include introduction to modern topics such as fracture mechanics and viscoelasticity. Unlike the competition, the text introduces more applications to contemporary practice, as well as modern computer tools (MATLAB).

  • Data Analysis for Chemistry: An Introductory Guide for Students and Laboratory Scientists

    Chemical data analysis, with aspects of metrology in chemistry and chemometrics, is an evolving discipline where new and better ways of doing things are constantly being developed. This book makes data analysis simple by demystifying the language and whenever possible giving unambiguous ways of doing things. Based on author D. Brynn Hibberts lectures on data analysis to undergraduates and graduate students, Data Analysis for Chemistry covers topics including measurements, means and confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and calibration models. The end result is a compromise between recipes of how to perform different aspects of data analysis, and basic information on the background principles behind the recipes to be performed. An entry level book targeted at learning and teaching undergraduate data analysis, Data Analysis for Chemistry makes it easy for readers to find the information they are seeking to perform the data analysis they think they need.

  • Creative Collaboration

    In Creative Collaboration, Vera John-Steiner offers rare and fascinating glimpses into the dynamic alliances from which some of our most important scholarly ideas, scientific theories and art forms are born. Within these pages we witness the creative process unfolding in the intimate relationships of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, Henry Miller and Anais Nin, Marie and Pierre Curie, Martha Graham and Erick Hawkins, and Georgia O'Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz; the productive partnerships of Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, Albert Einstein and Marcel Grossman, Aaron Copland and Leonard Bernstein, and Freeman Dyson and Richard Feynman; the familial collaborations of Thomas and Heinrich Mann, Hubert and Stuart Dreyfus, and Margaret Mead, Gregory Bateson and Mary Catherine Bateson; and the larger ensembles of The Guarneri String Quartet, Lee Strasburg, Harold Clurman and The Group Theatre, and such feminist groups as The Stone Center and the authors of Women's Ways of Knowing. Many of these collaborators complemented each other, meshing different backgrounds and forms into fresh styles, while others completely transformed their fields. Here is a unique cultural and historical perspective on the creative process. Indeed, by delving into these complex collaborations, John-Steiner illustrates that the mind - rather than thriving on solitude - is clearly dependent upon the reflections, renewal and trust inherent in sustained human relationships.

  • Trouble Next Door: What to Do with Your Neighbor

    Good fences may make good neighbors, but do you have the right to put up the fence if it obstructs your neighbor's view? This handy almanac addresses all the thorny issues that arise when people live in proximity to one another. Topics include boundary disputes, common areas and shared responsibilities, view obstruction, liability for property damage, abandoned and unkempt property, dangerous pets, and home-based businesses and zoning ordinances. For those issues that cannot be resolved otherwise, this almanac also covers dispute mediation, and as a last resort, taking your neighbor to small claims court. Topics covered include the rights and responsibilities of neighbors, common conflicts, and how to resolve a dispute before it escalates into a costly lawsuit or violence. This almanac also explores dispute mediation, and small claims court. The Appendix provides applicable statutes, resource directories, and other pertinent information and data , such as a warning letter, condominium fine policy, noise ordinance, and an agreement to mediate dispute. The Legal Almanac series consists of over 75 handy guides for the lay person on all aspects of the law. Each volume includes an overview of the topic followed by chapters on the major issues in that subject. Each volume contains an Appendix containing several primary source documents as well as practical forms and checklists. A Glossary defines any technical terms used in the text.

  • Divine Mirrors: The Virgin Mary in the Visual Arts

    Through a unique and stunning collection of paintings, sculpture, rare books, and works on paper, Divine Mirrors examines the complex relationship between sacred imagery and secular identity in the art of the Madonna. This magnificent work--born from a multi-year project that included a museum exhibition, scholarly symposium, and reinstallation of a segment of the permanent collection of the Davis Museum and Cultural Center at Wellesley College--features the work of such renowned artists as Il Pintoricchio, Mantegna, Munch, and Leger, alongside fresh, undiscovered masters and little-known works of art. The book's fifty catalogue entries range from a rare thirteenth-century panel painting to a specially commissioned artwork exploring the intersection of religion and modern life. This volume investigates everything from non-Western perceptions of European religious practices to the Virgin Mary's voice in musical composition. In the opening essay "The Many Names of the Mother of God" noted scholar Robert A. Orsi considers why images of Mary offer contemporary Americans such a powerful visual experience. Unlike paintings and sculptures created solely for aesthetic contemplation, Orsi writes, images of Mary are more than just artistic representations--they become for us an embodiment of the Virgin Mother herself. Then, moving into the historical realm, editor Melissa R. Katz guides us on a twenty-century chronological tour that explores the intersection of art history and world history in representations of Mary. Katz's essay "Regarding Mary: Women's Lives Reflected in the Virgin's Image" takes the elements of Marian iconography most relevant to the study of art and weaves them together to provide a guide for modern audiences to engage with the religious origins of our common artistic legacy. Filled with fascinating information, this important work requires no particular background in art history, religion, or the Bible. Readers of all levels will be rewarded with an in-depth encounter with a remarkable and complex figure."

  • A Practical Guide to Recovery-Oriented Practice

    This book takes a lofty vision of "recovery" and of "a life in the community" for every adult with a serious mental illness promised by the U.S. President's 2003 New Freedom Commission on Mental Health and shows the reader what is entailed in making this vision a reality. Beginning with the historical context of the recovery movement and its recent emergence on the center stage of mental health policy around the world, the authors then clarify various definitions of mental health recovery and address the most common misconceptiosn of recovery held by skeptical practitioners and wroried families. With this framework in place, the authors suggest fundamental principles for recovery-oreinted care, a set of concrete practice guidelines developed in and for the field, a recovery guide model of practice as an alternative to clinical case management, and tools to self-assess the recovery orientation of practices and practitioners. In doing so, this volume represents the first book to go beyond the rhetoric of recovery to its implementation in everyday practice. Much of this work was developed with the State of Connecticut's Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, helping the state to win a #1 ranking in the recent NAMI report card on state mental health authorities. Since initial development of these principles, guidelines, and tools in Connecticut, the authors have become increasingly involved in refining and tailoring this approach for other systems of care around the globe as more and more governments, ministry leaders, system managers, practitioners, and people with serious mental illnesses nad their families embrace the need to transform mental health services to promote recovery and community inclusion. If you've wondered what all of the recent to-do has been about with the notion of "recovery" in mental health, this book explains it. In addition, it gives you an insider's view of the challenges and strategies involved in transforming to recovery and a road map to follow on the first few steps down this exciting, promising, and perhaps long overdue path.

  • The Setting of the Pearl: Vienna under Hitler

    When Adolf Hitler seized Vienna in the Anschluss of 1938, he called the city "a pearl to which he would give a proper setting." But the setting he left behind seven years later was one of ruin and destruction--a physical, spiritual, and intellectual wasteland. Here is a grippingly narrated and heartbreaking account of the debasement of one of Europe's great cities. Thomas Weyr shows how Hitler turned Vienna from a vibrant metropolis that was the cradle of modernism into a drab provincial town. In this riveting narrative, we meet Austrian traitors like Arthur Seyss-Inquart and mass murderers like Odilo Globocnik; proconsuls like Joseph Buerckel, who hacked Austria into seven pieces, and Baldur von Schirach, who dreamed of making Vienna into a Nazi capital on the Danube--and failed miserably. More painfully, Weyr chronicles the swift destruction of a rich Jewish culture and the removal of the city's 200,000 Jews through murder, exile, and deportation. Vienna never regained the global role the city had once played. Today, Weyr concludes, only the monuments remain--beautiful but lifeless. This is not only the story of Nazi leaders but of how the Viennese themselves lived and died: those who embraced Hitler, those who resisted, and the many who merely, in the local phrase, "ran after the rabbit." The author draws on his own experiences as a child in Vienna under Nazi rule in 1938, and those of his parents and friends, plus extensive documentary research, to craft a vivid historical narrative that chillingly captures how a once-great city lost its soul under Hitler.

  • Religion and Emotion: Approaches and Interpretations

    Over the past decade the academic study of emotion has developed very substantially across a number of disciplines, including religious studies. This anthology is the first collection of recent papers addressing the topic of religion and emotion. The selected pieces-each a foundational essay in this rapidly evolving field-examine attitudes toward and expressions of emotion in a wide range of religious traditions and periods. Among the themes considered are the relation of emotion to moral or religious norms, the role of emotion in faith, religious emotion as a performance of feeling in ritual contexts, and the relation of emotion to religious language. Specific topics examined range from filial emotions and filial values in medieval Korean Buddhism to weeping and spirituality in 16th-century Jewish mysticism. This volume is designed to provide an introduction to recent work in the field and should appeal to both scholars and students of comparative religion, anthropology, and psychology.

  • Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898

    To European explorers, it was Eden, a paradise of waist-high grasses, towering stands of walnut, maple, chestnut, and oak, and forests that teemed with bears, wolves, racoons, beavers, otters, and foxes. Today it is the city of Broadway and Wall Street, the Empire State Building and the Statue of Liberty, and the home of millions of people, who have come from every corner of the nation and the globe. In "Gotham", Edwin G. Burrows and Mike Wallace have produced a monumental work of history,on ethat ranges from the Indian tribes that settled in and around the island of Manna-hata, to the consolidation of the five boroughs into Greater New York in 1898. Readers will relive the tumultuous early years of New Amsterdam under the Dutch West India Company, Peter Stuyvesant's despotic regime, Indian wars, slave resistance and revolt, the Revolutionary War and the defeat of Washington's army on Brooklyn Heoghts, the destructive seven years of British occupation, New York as the nation's first capital, the duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, the Erie Canal and the coming of the railroads, the growth of the city as a port and financial centre, the infamous draft riots of the Civil War, the great flood of immigrants, the rise of mass entertainment such as vaudeville and Coney Island, the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the birth of the skyscraper. Here too is a cast of thousands - the rebel Jacob Leisler and the reformer Joanna Bethune; Clement Moore, who saved Greenwich village from the city's grid street plan; Herman Melville, who painted disillusioned portraits of city life; and Walt Whitman, who hapily celebrated that same life. We meet Boss Tweed and his nemesis, cartoonist Thomas Nast; Emma Goldman and Nellie Bly; Jacob Riis and Horace Greely; police commissioner Theodore Roosevelt; Colonel Waring and his "white angels"(who revolutionised the sanitation department); millionaires John Jacob Astor, Cornelius Vanderbilt, August Belmont and William Randolph Hearst; and hundreds more who left their mark on this great city. The events and people who crowd these pages guarantee that this is no mere local history. It is in fact a portrait of the heart and soul of America, and a book that will mesmerise everyone interested in the peaks and valleys of American life as found in the greatest city on earth.

  • The Oxford Guide to The Book of Common Prayer: A Worldwide Survey

    Here, for the first time, is a comprehensive survey of the history of the original Book of Common Prayer and all of its descendants throughout the world. The Oxford Guide to the Book of Common Prayer shows how a classic text for worship and devotion has become the progenitor of an entire family of religious resources that have had an influence far beyond their use in Anglican churches. The tale begins with the creation of the first Prayer Book in 1549. The Guide surveys how the Prayer Book developed and took root in English culture. The story then describes how Anglican missionaries and others brought the Prayer Book to far corners of the British Empire. In the twentieth century, Anglican churches throughout the world began to develop their own, unique versions of the Prayer Book to serve the needs of their local communities. The Guide describes the development of indigenous Prayer Books in Africa, the nations of the Pacific, Asia, North and South America, and Europe. It explains how, in the dozens of Prayer Books in current use, the same basic texts - Daily Prayers, the Eucharist, Marriage and Funerals, and many others - resemble each other, and differ from each other. Finally, a brief look at the future of "electronic Prayer Books" offers a glimpse at how this story of development and adaptation may continue. John Donne, Samuel Johnson, Jane Austen, T. S. Eliot, W. H. Auden, C. S. Lewis, Dorothy Sayers, and P. D. James, among many others, worshiped from the Prayer Book, giving it immense literary influence. The Prayer Book family has created worship language that remains within Anglican tradition, while adapting to very different cultural contexts. Prayer Books in New Zealand, for example, incorporate Maori elements, and ones in Myanmar use Buddhist prayer forms - just a few of the fascinating facts in this rich and varied history. In this Guide any reader, Anglican or not, can learn why The Book of Common Prayer is a classic of liturgy and literature.

  • Ecologies of Grace: Environmental Ethics and Christian Theology

    Only recently have theologians begun to think and write about the ecological crisis in a focused manner. It is clear, however, that people of faith must come to grips with that crisis and find a way of thinking about it in the context of their beliefs. In this book, Willis Jenkins offers an introduction to Christian environemntal ethics. Following observations of lived environmental theologies, he argues that they often draw on concepts and metaphors of grace, thus placing environmental issues within Christian experiences of salvation. Jenkins therefore surveys major strategies of Christian environmental ethics by mapping them onto major traditions of grace and uses this new map to explore afresh the ecological dimensions of three distinctive theologies of grace.

  • Holy Men and Hunger Artists: Fasting and Asceticism in Rabbinic Culture

    The existence of ascetic elements within rabbinic Judaism has generally been either overlooked or actually denied. This is in part because asceticism is not commonly identified with celibacy, whereas the rabbis emphasized sexuality as a positive good. In addition, argues Eliezer Diamond, it serves the theological agendas of both Jewish and Christian scholars to characterise Judaism as non- or anti-ascetic. In fact, however, Diamond shows that rabbinic asceticism does indeed exist. This asceticism is secondary, rather than primary, in that the rabbis place no value on self-denial in and of itself, but rather require themselves the virtual abandonment of familial, social, and economic life in favour of an absolute commitment to the study of the Torah. It is an asceticism of neglect, rather than negation. One form of asceticism in particular - fasting - became increasingly popular in the wake of the destruction of the second temple. He traces this to the need to mourn the temple's devastation but also to the cessation of temple -related rituals. Diamond shows that fasting was seen as a substitute for these rituals when the Temple was destroyed.

  • Secrets, Gossip, and Gods: The Transformation of Brazilian Candomblé

    In this wide-ranging book Paul Christopher Johnson explores the changing, hidden face of the Afro-Brazilian indigenous religion of Candomble. Despite its importance in Brazilian society, Candomble has received far less attention than its sister religions Vodou and Santeria. Johnson seeks to fill this void by offering a comprehensive look at the development, beliefs, and practices of Candomble and exploring its transformation from a secret society of slaves--hidden, persecuted, and marginalized--to a public religion that is very much a part of Brazilian culture. Johnson traces this historical shift and locates the turning point in the creation of Brazilian national identity and a public sphere in the first half of the twentieth century. His major focus is on the ritual practice of secrecy in Candomble. Like Vodou and Santeria and the African Yoruba religion from which they are descended, Candomble features a hierarchic series of initiations, with increasing access to secret knowledge at each level. As Johnson shows, the nature and uses of secrecy evolved with the religion. First, secrecy was essential to a society that had to remain hidden from authorities. Later, when Candomble became known and actively persecuted, its secrecy became a form of resistance as well as an exotic hidden power desired by elites. Finally, as Candomble became a public religion and a vital part of Brazilian culture, the debate increasingly turned away from the secrets themselves and toward their possessors. It is speech about secrets, and not the content of those secrets, that is now most important in building status, legitimacy and power in Candomble. Offering many first hand accounts of the rites and rituals of contemporary Candomble, this book provides insight into this influential but little-studied group, while at the same time making a valuable contribution to our understanding of the relationship between religion and society.

  • On The Take: How Medicine's Complicity with Big Business Can Endanger Your Health

    We all know that doctors accept gifts from drug companies, ranging from pens and coffee mugs to free vacations at luxurious resorts. But as the former Editor-in-Chief of The New England Journal of Medicine reveals in this shocking expose, these innocuous-seeming gifts are just the tip of an iceberg that is distorting the practice of medicine and jeopardizing the health of millions of Americans today. In On the Take, Dr. Jerome Kassirer offers an unsettling look at the pervasive payoffs that physicians take from big drug companies and other medical suppliers, arguing that the billion-dollar onslaught of industry money has deflected many physicians' moral compasses and directly impacted the everyday care we receive from the doctors and institutions we trust most. Underscored by countless chilling untold stories, the book illuminates the financial connections between the wealthy companies that make drugs and the doctors who prescribe them. Kassirer details the shocking extent of these financial enticements and explains how they encourage bias, promote dangerously misleading medical information, raise the cost of medical care, and breed distrust. Among the questionable practices he describes are: the disturbing number of senior academic physicians who have financial arrangements with drug companies; the unregulated "front" organizations that advocate certain drugs; the creation of biased medical education materials by the drug companies themselves; and the use of financially conflicted physicians to write clinical practice guidelines or to testify before the FDA in support of a particular drug. A brilliant diagnosis of an epidemic of greed, On the Take offers insight into how we can cure the medical profession and restore our trust in doctors and hospitals.

  • The Oxford Dictionary of Difficult Words

    We all know what the words cat and dog and mother and tree mean. What we really need is a dictionary that helps us with the tough words, like elucubrate, or demesne, or cynosure. True, a standard dictionary can bail us out when we run across a tough word at home or in a library. But we often read elsewhere--in a doctor's waiting room or on a plane, or while on vacation. What do we do then? The Oxford Dictionary of Difficult Words is designed to meet this need. A portable, pocket-sized reference, it features more than 10,000 entries that focus exclusively on words that, while outside most people's working vocabulary, are often encountered in literature, in technical writings (such as computing or medical terminology), and in such diverse subject areas as law, philosophy, and art. Entries contain pronunciations, parts of speech, concise definitions, example sentences showing the word used in context, and etymologies when a word's history may shed light on its meaning. Special attention is given to easily confused or closely related words (such as efficacious, effective, effectual, and efficient, or cynical, sarcastic, sardonic, and ironic). Usage notes are provided to ensure that readers know how to integrate these words into their vocabularies for more precision and power in speech and writing. Produced by a team of experienced lexicographers, drawing on Oxford's exclusive 200-million-word database of contemporary English, this handy volume helps us with the words that lie just outside our vocabulary, words we just won't find in other pocket dictionaries.

  • No One Was Turned Away: The Role of Public Hospitals in New York City since 1900

    No One Was Turned Away is a book about the importance of public hospitals to New York City. At a time when less and less value seems to be placed on public institutions, argues author Sandra Opdycke, it is both useful and prudent to consider what this particular set of public institutions has meant to this particular city over the last hundred years, and to ponder what its loss might mean as well. Opdycke suggests that if these public hospitals close or convert to private management--as is currently being discussed--then a vital element of the civic life of New York City will be irretrievably lost. The story is told primarily through the history of Bellevue Hospital, the largest public hospital in the city and the oldest in the nation. Following Bellevue through the twentieth century, Opdycke meticulously charts the fluctuating fortunes of the city's public hospital system. Readers will learn how medical technology, urban politics, changing immigration patterns, economic booms and busts, labor unions, health insurance, Medicaid, and managed care have interacted to shape both the social and professional environments of New York's public hospitals. Having entered the twentieth century with high hopes for a grand expansion, Bellevue now faces financial and political pressures so acute that its very future is in doubt. In order to give context to the Bellevue experience, Opdycke also tracks the history of a private facility over the same century: New York Hospital. By noting the points at which the paths of these two mighty institutions have overlapped--as well as the ways in which they have diverged--this book clearly and persuasively highlights the significance of public hospitals to the city. No One Was Turned Away shows that private facilities like New York Hospital have generally provided superb care for their patients, but that in every era they have also excluded certain groups. This exclusion has occurred for various reasons, such as patients' diagnoses, their social characteristics, behavior, or financial status--or simply because of a lack of unoccupied beds. Fortunately, however, year in and year out, Bellevue and its fellow public facilities have acted as the city's medical safety net. Opdycke's book maintains that public hospitals will be as essential in the future as they have been in the past. This is a thoughtful and well-written study that will appeal to anyone interested in the history of medicine, public policy, urban affairs, or the City of New York.

  • Palliative Care Perspectives

    Dr. Hallenbeck has written a guide for clinicians who want an introduction to palliative care that addresses "big picture" issues as well as provides specific, practical advice. Topics addressed range from an overview of death and dying in the modern world to discussions of pain and symptom management, communication techniques and palliative care consults.

  • Do Penance or Perish: Magdalen Asylums in Ireland

    Frances Finnegan traces the development of Ireland's Magdalen Asylums - homes that were founded in the mid-nineteenth century for the detention of prostitutes undergoing reform. The inmates of these asylums were discouraged - and many forcibly prevented - from leaving,and sometimes were detained for life. Put to work without pay in adjoining laundries, these women were subject to penance, harsh discipline, enforced silence, and prayer. As the numbers of prostitutes began to dwindle, the church looked elsewhere for this free labor, targeting other 'fallen' women such as unwed mothers and wayward or abused girls. Some were incarcerated simply for being 'too beautiful', and therefore in danger of sin. Others were mentally retarded. Most of them were brought to the asylums by their families or priests, and many were forcibly prevented from leaving. Unbelievably, the last of these asylums was closed only in 1996. Drawing on hitherto unpublished material, Finnegan presents case histories of individual women and their experiences in Magdalen homes, which claimed some 30,000 women in all. Do Penance or Perish is the first study of this shameful episode in Irish history.

  • Divided by Faith: Evangelical Religion and the Problem of Race in America

    In recent years, the leaders of the American evangelical movement have brought their characteristic passion to the problem of race, notably in the Promise Keepers movement and in reconciliation theology. But the authors of this provocative new study reveal that despite their good intentions, evangelicals may actually be preserving America's racial chasm. In Divided by Faith, Michael O. Emerson and Christian Smith probe the grassroots of white evangelical America, through a nationwide telephone survey of 2,000 people, along with 200 face-to-face interviews. The results of their research are surprising. Most white evangelicals, they learned, see no systematic discrimination against blacks; indeed, they deny the existence of any ongoing racial problem in the United States. Many of their subjects blamed the continuing talk of racial conflict on the media, unscrupulous black leaders, and the inability of African Americans to forget the past. What lies behind this perception? Evangelicals, Emerson and Smith write, are not so much actively racist as committed to a theological view of the world that makes it difficult for them to see systematic injustice. The evangelical emphasis on individualism, free will, and personal relationships makes invisible the pervasive injustice that perpetuates inequality between the races. Most racial problems, they told the authors, can be solved by the repentance and conversion of the sinful individuals at fault. Combining a substantial body of evidence with sophisticated analysis and interpretation, Emerson and Smith throw sharp light on the oldest American dilemma. Despite the best intentions of evangelical leaders and some positive trends, the authors conclude that real racial reconciliation remains far over the horizon.

  • Comparative Mysticism: An Anthology of Original Sources

    This collection of primary texts introduces readers to the mystical literature of the world's great religious traditions. Beginning with an introduction by Steven T. Katz, a leading scholar of mysticism, the anthology comprises poetry, prayer, narrative, and other writings from Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, Taoist, Confucianist, and Native American traditions. This collection provides readers not only with the primary mystical texts from each religious tradition, but with an explanation of the context of the source and tradition. Comparative Mysticism shows how the great mystical traditions of the world are deeply rooted in the religious traditions from which they originated. The contextual methodological approach taken throughout the anthology also addresses the critical question of what these mystical traditions, at their highest level, have in common. Despite the prevailing view that mystical traditions throughout the world are essentially similar, the presentation of the sources in this volume suggests that, in fact, the various traditions have distinct teachings and different metaphysical goals. The writings collected in Comparative Mysticism address the most fundamental and important methodological, epistemological, and hermeneutical questions regarding the study and interpretation of mysticism and mystical sources across cultures. This anthology will be an invaluable resource to students and scholars of mystic tradition for years to come.

  • MEG: An Introduction to Methods

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is an exciting brain imaging technology that allows real-time tracking of neural activity, making it an invaluable tool for advancing our understanding of brain function. In this comprehensive introduction to MEG, Peter Hansen, Morten Kringelbach, and Riitta Salmelin have brought together the leading researchers to provide the basic tools for planning and executing MEG experiments, as well as analyzing and interpreting the resulting data. Chapters on the basics describe the fundamentals of MEG and its instrumentation, and provide guidelines for designing experiments and performing successful measurements. Chapters on data analysis present it in detail, from general concepts and assumptions to analysis of evoked responses and oscillatory background activity. Chapters on solutions propose potential solutions to the inverse problem using techniques such as minimum norm estimates, spatial filters and beamformers. Chapters on combinations elucidate how MEG can be used to complement other neuroimaging techniques. Chapters on applications provide practical examples of how to use MEG to study sensory processing and cognitive tasks, and how MEG can be used in a clinical setting. These chapters form a complete basic reference source for those interested in exploring or already using MEG that will hopefully inspire them to try to develop new, exciting approaches to designing and analyzing their own studies. This book will be a valuable resource for researchers from diverse fields, including neuroimaging, cognitive neuroscience, medical imaging, computer modelling, as well as for clinical practitioners.

  • Xenophon's Anabasis, or The Expedition of Cyrus

    Xenophon's Anabasis, or The Expedition of Cyrus, is one of the most exciting historical narratives--as well as the most important autobiographical work--to have survived from ancient Greece. It tells the story of Cyrus, a young and charismatic Persian prince, who in 401 BC enlisted more than ten thousand Greek mercenaries in an attempt to seize the vast Persian empire for himself. Cyrus was killed in a great battle, most of the Greek commanders subsequently fell victim to treachery, and an Athenian aristocrat by the name of Xenophon found himself in the unexpected position of taking charge and leading the Greeks from the vicinity of Babylon in modern Iraq back to the Greek cities in Turkey. This book both places the Anabasis in its historical and literary context and, by employing a variety of critical methods, opens up for the reader different ways of interpreting its major themes. Interrelated chapters investigate Xenophon's self-representation as a model leader, his possible didactic and apologetic purposes for writing, the generic expectations of his contemporary audience, the factual accuracy of the Anabasis, and the ways in which the gods are depicted as intervening in human affairs. This book unveils the literary artistry and narrative strategies that have gone into shaping one of the greatest survival stories of all time.

  • Black Culture and Black Consciousness: Afro-American Folk Thought from Slavery to Freedom

    When Black Culture and Black Consciousness first appeared thirty years ago, it marked a revolution in our understanding of African American history. Contrary to prevailing ideas at the time, which held that African culture disappeared quickly under slavery and that black Americans had little group pride, history, or cohesiveness, Levine uncovered a cultural treasure trove, illuminating a rich and complex African American oral tradition, including songs, proverbs, jokes, folktales, and long narrative poems called toasts--work that dated from before and after emancipation. The fact that these ideas and sources seem so commonplace now is in large part due this book and the scholarship that followed in its wake. A landmark work that was part of the "cultural turn" in American history, Black Culture and Black Consciousness profoundly influenced an entire generation of historians and continues to be read and taught. For this anniversary reissue, Levine wrote a new preface reflecting on the writing of the book and its place within intellectual trends in African American and American cultural history. "Must be read by all who would understand the Afro-American experience and American culture in general." --Eugene D. Genovese "Through an exhaustive investigation of black songs, folk tales, proverbs, aphorisms, verbal games and the long narrative oral poems known as 'toasts,' Levine argues that the value system of Afro-Americans can only be understood through an analysis of black culture.... His work ranks among the best books written on the Afro-American experience in recent years." --Al-Tony Gilmore, The Washington Post

  • The Nothing That Is: A Natural History of Zero

    A symbol for what is not there, an emptiness that increases any number it's added to, an inexhaustible and indispensable paradox. As we enter the year 2000, zero is once again making its presence felt. Nothing itself, it makes possible a myriad of calculations. Indeed, without zero mathematics as we know it would not exist. And without mathematics our understanding of the universe would be vastly impoverished. But where did this nothing, this hollow circle, come from? Who created it? And what, exactly, does it mean?
    Robert Kaplan's The Nothing That Is: A Natural History of Zero begins as a mystery story, taking us back to Sumerian times, and then to Greece and India, piecing together the way the idea of a symbol for nothing evolved. Kaplan shows us just how handicapped our ancestors were in trying to figure large sums without the aid of the zero. (Try multiplying CLXIV by XXIV). Remarkably, even the Greeks, mathematically brilliant as they were, didn't have a zero--or did they? We follow the trail to the East where, a millennium or two ago, Indian mathematicians took another crucial step. By treating zero for the first time like any other number, instead of a unique symbol, they allowed huge new leaps forward in computation, and also in our understanding of how mathematics itself works.
    In the Middle Ages, this mathematical knowledge swept across western Europe via Arab traders. At first it was called "dangerous Saracen magic" and considered the Devil's work, but it wasn't long before merchants and bankers saw how handy this magic was, and used it to develop tools like double-entry bookkeeping. Zero quickly became an essential part of increasingly sophisticated equations, and with the invention of calculus, one could say it was a linchpin of the scientific revolution. And now even deeper layers of this thing that is nothing are coming to light: our computers speak only in zeros and ones, and modern mathematics shows that zero alone can be made to generate everything.
    Robert Kaplan serves up all this history with immense zest and humor; his writing is full of anecdotes and asides, and quotations from Shakespeare to Wallace Stevens extend the book's context far beyond the scope of scientific specialists. For Kaplan, the history of zero is a lens for looking not only into the evolution of mathematics but into very nature of human thought. He points out how the history of mathematics is a process of recursive abstraction: how once a symbol is created to represent an idea, that symbol itself gives rise to new operations that in turn lead to new ideas. The beauty of mathematics is that even though we invent it, we seem to be discovering something that already exists.
    The joy of that discovery shines from Kaplan's pages, as he ranges from Archimedes to Einstein, making fascinating connections between mathematical insights from every age and culture. A tour de force of science history, The Nothing That Is takes us through the hollow circle that leads to infinity.

  • Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism

    Only one of the world's mythologies has remained essentially unrecognized--the mythology of Judaism. As Howard Schwartz reveals in Tree of Souls, the first anthology of Jewish mythology in English, this mythical tradition is as rich and as fascinating as any in the world. Drawing from the Bible, the Pseudepigrapha, the Talmud and Midrash, the kabbalistic literature, medieval folklore, Hasidic texts, and oral lore collected in the modern era, Schwartz has gathered together nearly 700 of the key Jewish myths. The myths themselves are marvelous. We read of Adam's diamond and the Land of Eretz (where it is always dark), the fall of Lucifer and the quarrel of the sun and the moon, the Treasury of Souls and the Divine Chariot. We discover new tales about the great figures of the Hebrew Bible, from Adam to Moses; stories about God's Bride, the Shekhinah, and the evil temptress, Lilith; plus many tales about angels and demons, spirits and vampires, giant beasts and the Golem. Equally important, Schwartz provides a wealth of additional information. For each myth, he includes extensive commentary, revealing the source of the myth and explaining how it relates to other Jewish myths as well as to world literature (for instance, comparing Eve's release of evil into the world with Pandora's). For ease of use, Schwartz divides the volume into ten books: Myths of God, Myths of Creation, Myths of Heaven, Myths of Hell, Myths of the Holy Word, Myths of the Holy Time, Myths of the Holy People, Myths of the Holy Land, Myths of Exile, and Myths of the Messiah. Schwartz, a renowned collector and teller of traditional Jewish tales, now illuminates the previously unexplored territory of Jewish mythology. This pioneering anthology is essential for anyone interested in the Hebrew Bible, Jewish faith and culture, and world mythology.

  • The New Grove Guide to Mozart and His Operas

    Each entry in the New Grove Guides series of composers and their operas is based on articles in The New Grove Dictionary of Opera, that feature information on the lives of individual composers, their works, their librettists and interpreters, and the places where they performed. These unique books compile the meticulously researched articles into organized narratives, designed to make finding information as easy as possible without sacrificing readability. Each volume is completely up-to-date, and includes a suggested listening guide and an eight-page glossy insert containing relevant illustrations. Each volume is a must-own for lovers of opera and classical music. One of the best known and most admired figures in European music was Wolfgang Amade Mozart. His short but colorful life is of enduring interest, and his works remain central to the repertories of classical music. This book gives a concise and scholarly account of Mozart's activities as a composer of operas. It includes a concise biography, orientated towards the operas; an essay on Mozart's operatic contribution and style, and the antecedents to his operas; a separate synopsis and historical account of each opera; and three essays which bind into narrative form the dictionary entries on librettists, interpreters, and venues. There is a new introduction, a glossary of relevant terms, a list of operatic roles, and a guide to listening.

  • Kyoto: A Cultural History

    Kyoto, the ancient former capital of Japan, breathes history and mystery. Its temples, gardens and palaces are testimony to many centuries of aristocratic and religious grandeur. Under the veneer of modernity, the city remains filled with countless reminders of a proud past. John Dougill explores this most venerable of Japanese cities, revealing the spirit of place and the individuals that have shaped its often dramatic history. Courtiers and courtesans, poets and priests, samurai and geisha people the pages of his account. Covering twelve centuries in all, the book not only provides a historical overview but also brings to life the cultural magnificence of the city of "Purple Hills and Crystal Streams."

  • The Swing Years

    In the 1930s swing music was everywhere--on radio, recordings, and in the great ballrooms, hotels, theatres, and clubs. Perhaps at no other time were drummers more central to the sound and spirit of jazz. Benny Goodman showcased Gene Krupa. Jimmy Dorsey featured Ray McKinley. Artie Shaw helped make Buddy Rich a star while Count Basie riffed with the innovative Jo Jones. Drummers were at the core of this music; as Jo Jones said, "The drummer is the key--the heartbeat of jazz." An oral history told by the drummers, other musicians, and industry figures, Drummin' Men is also Burt Korall's memoir of more than fifty years in jazz. Personal and moving, the book is a celebration of the music of the time and the men who made it. Meet Chick Webb, small, fragile-looking, a hunchback from childhood, whose explosive drumming style thrilled and amazed; Gene Krupa, the great showman and pacemaker; Ray McKinley, whose rhythmic charm, light touch, and musical approach provided a great example for countless others, and the many more that populate this story. Based on interviews with a collection of the most important jazzmen, Drummin' Men offers an inside view of the swing years that cannot be found anywhere else.

  • The New Unconscious

    Over the past two decades, a new picture of the cognitive unconscious has emerged from a variety of disciplines that are broadly part of cognitive science. According to this picture, unconscious processes seem to be capable of doing many things that were thought to require intention, deliberation, and conscious awareness. Moreover, they accomplish these things without the conflict and drama of the psychoanalytic unconscious. These processes range from complex information processing, through goal pursuit and emotions, to cognitive control and self-regulation. This collection of 20 original chapters by leading researchers examines the cognitive unconscious from social, cognitive, and neuroscientific viewpoints, presenting some of the most important developments at the heart of this new picture of the unconscious. The volume, the first book in the new Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience series, will be an important resource on the cognitive unconscious for researchers in cognitive psychology and neuroscience.

  • Dancing Revelations: Alvin Ailey's Embodiment of African American Culture

    In the early 1960s, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater was a small, multi-racial company of dancers that performed the works of its founding choreographer and other emerging artists. By the late 1960s, the company had become a well-known African American artistic group closely tied to the Civil Rights struggle. In Dancing Revelations, Thomas DeFrantz chronicles the troupe's journey from a small modern dance company to one of the premier institutions of African American culture. He not only charts this rise to national and international renown, but also contextualizes this progress within the civil rights, women's rights, and gay rights struggles of the late 20th century. DeFrantz examines the most celebrated Ailey dances, including Revelations, drawing on video recordings of Ailey's dances, published interviews, oral histories, and his own interviews with former Ailey company dancers. Through vivid descriptions and beautiful illustrations, DeFrantz reveals the relationship between Ailey's works and African American culture as a whole. He illuminates the dual achievement of Ailey as an artist and as an arts activist committed to developing an African American presence in dance. He also addresses concerns about how dance performance is documented, including issues around spectatorship and the display of sexuality, the relationship of Ailey's dances to civil rights activism, and the establishment and maintenance of a successful, large-scale Black Arts institution. Throughout Dancing Revelations, DeFrantz illustrates how Ailey combined elements of African dance with motifs adapted from blues, jazz, and Broadway to choreograph his dances. By re-interpreting these tropes of black culture in his original and well-received dances, DeFrantz argues that Ailey played a significant role in defining the African American cultural canon in the twentieth century. As the first book to examine the cultural sources and cultural impact of Ailey's work, Dancing Revelations is an important contribution to modern dance history and criticism as well as African-American studies.

  • Enhancing Sexuality: A Problem-Solving Approach to Treating Dysfunction

    At some point in life, almost all men and women have a problem with sexual functioning. If you are looking for solutions to sexual problems, this workbook can help. You may use it in conjunction with visits to a qualified mental health professional or on your own, with or without your partner. This workbook gives you correct information about sex and offers information, advice, and practical suggestions for common sexual problems. From this book, you will learn to improve and enjoy your sexual relations. Divided into three parts, this workbook presents a comprehensive program for solving sexual problems. Part I includes basic information that is helpful for understanding sexual problems and sexual functioning in general. Part II addresses specific sexual problems and provides information and strategies to alleviate and overcome them. Finally, Part III focuses on information and strategies to help you maintain the gains you've made. Exercises for couples, chapter review quizzes, and user-friendly worksheets can be found throughout the workbook and will help you increase your knowledge and understanding of sex and sexual relationships. The information presented is based on research and has helped thousands of people like you, and their partners, solve sexual problems and prevent them from occurring again.

  • Five to Rule Them All: The UN Security Council and the Making of the Modern World

    For over sixty years five nations have held a unique position in determining world affairs. But is the UN Security Council still fit for purpose?

  • Vanishing Voices: The Extinction of the World's Languages

    A dramatic account of the rate of language extinction, and how it endangers the future of biodiversity Few people know that nearly 100 native languages once spoken in what is now California are near extinction, or that most of Australia's 250 aboriginal languages have vanished. In fact, at least half of the world's languages may die out in the next century. What has happened to these voices? Should we be alarmed about the disappearance of linguistic diversity? The authors of Vanishing Voices assert that this trend is far more than simply disturbing. Making explicit the link between language survival and environmental issues, they argue that the extinction of languages is part of the larger picture of near-total collapse of the worldwide ecosystem. Indeed, the authors contend that the struggle to preserve precious environmental resources-such as the rainforest-cannot be separated from the struggle to maintain diverse cultures, and that the causes of language death, like that of ecological destruction, lie at the intersection of ecology and politics. And while Nettle and Romaine defend the world's endangered languages, they also pay homage to the last speakers of dying tongues, such as Red Thundercloud, a Native American in South Carolina, Ned Mandrell, with whom the Manx language passed away in 1974, and Arthur Bennett, an Australian, the last person to know more than a few words of Mbabaram. In our languages lies the accumulated knowledge of humanity. Indeed, each language is a unique window on experience. Vanishing Voices is a call to preserve this resource, before it is too late.

  • America Transformed: Globalization, Inequality, and Power

    In this book, a key question is discussed: what is the effect of globalization on societal level inequality? Intended for undergraduates, the book investigates the links between global processes and shifting patterns of stratification, inequality, and social mobility. Most books directed at undergraduates tend to separate discussions of micro-level processes (finding work, e.g.), or macro-level processes (shifting economic structures, e.g.), or global inequality (between societies) without making concrete the connections between the different levels. This book will integrate discussions of both literature and provide sociology students with analytical and conceptual tools to define, understand, and assess the assumptions and positions within the globalization debate. In addition, the book will illustrate how global processes are linked to stratification and inequality in general, but particularly in the United States. Policy issues raised by globalization will be discussed, with an eye towards identifying innovative and effective community-based responses to social inequality.

  • Death and Money in the Afternoon: A History of the Spanish Bullfight

    Bullfighting has long been perceived as an antiquated, barbarous legacy from Spain's medieval past. In fact, many of that country's best poets, philosophers, and intellectuals have accepted the corrida as the embodiment of Spain's rejection of the modern world. In his brilliant new interpretation of bullfighting, Adrian Shubert maintains that this view is both the product of myth and a complete misunderstanding of the real roots of the contemporary bullfight. While references to a form of bullfighting date back to the Poem of the Cid (1040), the modern bullfight did not emerge until the early 18th century. And when it did emerge, it was far from being an archaic remnant of the past--it was a precursor of the 20th-century mass leisure industry. Indeed, before today's multimillion-dollar athletes with wide-spread commercial appeal, there was Francisco Romero, born in 1700, whose unique form of bullfighting netted him unprecedented fame and wealth, and Manuel Rodriguez Manolete, hailed as Spain's greatest matador by the New York Times after a fatal goring in 1947. The bullfight was replete with promoters, agents, journalists, and, of course, hugely-paid bullfighters who were exploited to promote wine, cigarettes, and other products. Shubert analyzes the business of the sport, and explores the bullfighters' world: their social and geographic origins, careers, and social status. Here also are surprising revelations about the sport, such as the presence of women bullfighters--and the larger gender issues that this provoked. From the political use of bullfighting in royal and imperial pageants to the nationalistic "great patriotic bullfights" of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, this is both a fascinating portrait of bullfighting and a vivid recreation of two centuries of Spanish history. Based on extensive research and engagingly written, Death and Money in the Afternoon vividly examines the evolution of Spanish culture and society through the prism of one of the West's first--and perhaps its most spectacular--spectator sports.

  • Integrated Practice: Coordination, Rhythm & Sound

    To be a musician is to "speak music." When you have something to say and you know how to say it, your gestures and sounds become both expressive and free. Offering an innovative, comprehensive approach to musicians' health and well-being, Integrated Practice gives you the tools to combine total-body awareness with a deep and practical understanding of the rhythmic structure of the musical language, so that you can "speak music" fluently, healthfully, and effectively. The key to mastering the language of music is rhythm. Integrated Practice contains an in-depth study of rhythm in music and in coordination, with dozens of exercises to help you infuse your gestures and musical phrases with rhythmic energy. The balance between structure and inventiveness is also essential to your well-being. Music is based on predictable grids of chords, scales, and time signatures, and yet your music-making ought to be unpredictable and fluid. Integrated Practice shows you how to establish an imaginative dialogue between the relatively inflexible structure of music and your own individual style as a singer, instrumentalist, or conductor. Integrated Practice covers the harmonic series in detail and includes novel approaches to improvisation, with exercises that you can apply to daily practice, rehearsing, and performing across the entire repertory. The book is accompanied by a dedicated website with dozens of video and audio clips that demonstrate the book's exercise.

  • Leading Issues in Economic Development

    Since 1964, Leading Issues in Economic Development has been a market leading undergraduate development textbook. Reviewers praise the new edition for its explanation of theories and its wide range of references to authors, international organisations and web sites.

  • Rethinking Risk Assessment: The MacArthur Study of Mental Disorder and Violence

    Rethinking Risk Assessment tells the story of a pioneering investigation that challenges preconceptions about the frequency and nature of violence among persons with mental disorders, and suggests an innovative approach to predicting its occurrence.

  • Anger: The Seven Deadly Sins

    Heated words, cool malice, deadly feuds, the furious rush of adrenaline-anger is clearly the most destructive of the seven deadly sins. It can ruin families, wreck one's health, destroy peace of mind and, at its worst, lead to murder, genocide, and war. In Anger, Robert A. F. Thurman, best-selling author and one of America's leading authorities on Buddhism and Eastern philosophy, offers an illuminating look at this deadliest of sins. In the West, Thurman points out, anger is seen as an inevitable part of life, an evil to be borne, not overcome. There is the tradition of the wrathful God, of Jesus driving the money-changers from the temple. If God can be angry, how can men rid themselves of this destructive emotion? Thurman shows that Eastern philosophy sees anger differently. Certainly, it is a dreadful evil, one of the "three poisons" that underlie all human suffering. But Buddhism teaches that anger can be overcome. Indeed, the defeat of anger is not only possible, but also the only thing worth doing in a lifetime. Thurman shows how to recognize the destructiveness of anger and understand its workings, and how we can go from being a slave to anger to becoming "a knight of patience." We discover finally that when this deadliest emotion is transmuted by wisdom, it can become the most powerful force in freeing us from human suffering. Drawing on the time-tested wisdom of Buddhism, Robert A. F. Thurman ranges from the individual struggle with anger to global crises spurred by dogmatic ideologies, religious fanaticism, and racial prejudice. He offers a path of calm understanding in a time of terrorism and war.

  • Burr, Hamilton, and Jefferson: A Study in Character

    This book restores Aaron Burr to his place as a central figure in the founding of the American Republic. Abolitionist, proto-feminist, friend to such Indian leaders as Joseph Brant, Burr was personally acquainted with a wider range of Americans, and of the American continent, than any other Founder except George Washington. He contested for power with Hamilton and then with Jefferson on a continental scale. The book does not sentimentalize any of its three protagonists, neither does it derogate their extraordinary qualities. They were all great men, all flawed, and all three failed to achieve their full aspirations. But their struggles make for an epic tale. Written from the perspective of a historian and administrator who, over nearly fifty years in public life, has served six presidents, this book penetrates into the personal qualities of its three central figures. In telling the tale of their shifting power relationships and their antipathies, it reassesses their policies and the consequences of their successes and failures. Fresh information about the careers of Hamilton and Burr is derived from newly-discovered sources, and a supporting cast of secondary figures emerges to give depth and irony to the principal narrative. This is a book for people who know how political life is lived, and who refuse to be confined within preconceptions and prejudices until they have weighed all the evidence, to reach their own conclusions both as to events and character. This is a controversial book, but not a confrontational one, for it is written with sympathy for men of high aspirations, who were disappointed in much, but who succeeded, in all three cases, to a degree not hitherto fully understood.

  • The Baroque Clarinet

    The Baroque Clarinet is a sourcebook for the historical study of the European clarinet during the first half of the eighteenth century. The book is based on a comprehensive study of the theoretical, musical, and iconographical evidence, and many conclusions are presented here for the first time.

  • Ethics and Values in Social Work: An Integrated Approach for a Comprehensive Curriculum

    In a unique and student-friendly package, Ethics and Values in Social Work offers a series of learning modules that will ensure graduates receive a comprehensive ethics and values education. Designed to be easily incorporated into any curriculum, each module helps students integrate the knowledge, skills, self-awareness, and critical thinking abilities required for dealing with ethical issues. From applying basic ethical standards of practice to managing complex ethical dilemmas, this textbook equips readers with a range of tools and strategies for responding to ethical questions and concerns. Traditional ethics textbooks provide students with a model for ethical decision making. This breakthrough textbook goes beyond ethical decision making by providing students with a strategic framework for managing ethical issues that includes guidelines for engaging others in ethical discussions and using conflict resolution theory to promote collaborative solutions. Some textbooks introduce students to ethical theories, such as deontology, teleology, and virtue ethics. This textbook goes beyond describing these theories by providing students with opportunities to apply, compare, and contrast these approaches as they relate to various contexts of social work practice. A wealth of case scenarios, discussion questions, and role-play exercises make this an engaging, thought-provoking teaching and learning tool. At a basic level, this textbook teaches students the essential principles and standards that define ethical practice. At a more profound level, Ethics and Values in Social Work inspires students to reach for the highest values of profession: service, dignity and worth of the person, human relationships, integrity, competence, social justice, human rights, and scientific inquiry. BL Format and contents help social work programs meet and exceed CSWE accreditation standards, providing a clear structure for integrating ethics and values content throughout foundation and advanced courses. BL The six-stage framework for managing ethical issues provides a range of tools and strategies for identifying, analyzing, and responding to ethical problems, dilemmas, and breaches. BL A developmental approach to learning ethics supports students in engaging in higher levels of understanding, abstraction, application, and synthesis of ethics material. BL Experiential exercises prepare students for managing the ethical and values issues that may arise in field placements. BL Fun, engaging activities encourage students to reflect, question, and apply theory to practice. BL Thought-provoking and reality-based case examples illustrate thorny ethical issues that professionals may encounter, ranging from end-of-life decision making to boundary crossings to rationing resources during a national crisis.

  • A Time for Listening and Caring: Spirituality and the Care of the Chronically Ill and Dying

    This book is a thoughtful, informative, and practical guide for anyone involved in caring for the seriously and chronically ill or dying. The connection between spirituality and medicine has been receiving a lot of attention in both the scientific and lay presses recently, but research and anecdotal evidence all indicate that spirituality is central to the care of the chronically ill and dying. It is therefore critical that healthcare providers who interact with seriously ill patients know how to address their spiritual needs. This book presents current thinking on how spiritual care can be integrated into traditional caregiving. Part one discusses aspects of spirituality, such as presence, ethics, and relationships. Part two delves into a number of specific religious and theological traditions. Part three offers practical applications and tools, including storytelling, psychotherapy, dance, music, and the arts. Part four focuses on patients' stories and reflections. The book concludes with appendices that have sample advance directives for Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, and Muslim patients. Volume editor Christina Puchalski is the director of the George Washington Institute of Spirituality and Health. She is also an associate professor of medicine at the George Washington University Medical Center and an active practicing physician and medical educator. Dr. Puchalski is nationally and internationally recognised as a pioneer in the integration of spirituality and healthcare. Chapters are authored by an impressive group of medical and religious experts, and patients' stories also appear throughout, offering real-world examples. The book features a foreword by the Dalai Lama.

  • From Artefacts to Atoms: The BIPM and the Search for Ultimate Measurement Standards

    The International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) is currently implementing the greatest change ever in the world's system of weights and measures -- it is redefining the kilogram, the final artefact standard, and reorganizing the system of international units. This book tells the inside story of what led to these changes, from the events surrounding the founding of the BIPM in 1875 -- a landmark in the history of international cooperation -- to the present. It traces not only the evolution of the science, but also the story of the key individuals and events. The BIPM was the first international scientific laboratory. Founded in 1875 by the Metre Convention, its original tasks were to conserve the new international standards of the metre and the kilogram, to carry out calibrations for Member States and undertake research to advance measurement science. The book is based on the substantial archive of the BIPM which, from the very beginning, recounts the many discussions and arguments first as to whether and how such an institute should be created and in due course, how over the next one hundred and thirty years it should develop. Despite many national and personal rivalries, the institute actually created was admirably suited to its declared tasks. In the years and decades that followed, the scientific work of the small group of men who made up its first staff was of a very high order. One of the early Directors received the Nobel Prize for physics in 1920 for his discovery of invar. The international governing Board of the institute, the International Committee of Weights and Measures, has guided the institute from one charged with the conservation of the prototype artefacts to one now at the centre of world metrology and preparing for the redefinition of the last remaining artifact, the kilogram, in terms of a fixed value for one of the fundamental constants of physics, the Planck constant

  • Write Like a Chemist: A Textbook and Resource

    Meant as a companion to The ACS Style Guide, not a competitor, this book is an extraordinary resource for upper-level chemistry majors as well as graduate students faced with writing a journal article, a conference abstract, or a thesis. Full of prepared research projects and exercises, Write Like a Chemist provides expert instruction ideal for students from diverse backgrounds, including both native and nonnative speakers of English. It is specifically designed to help students transition from the writing skills required in undergraduate lecture and laboratory classes to writing skills required by career chemists: a journal article, a scientific poster, and a research proposal. Each of these types of writing is directed toward a different audience, and writing for a journal requires a different writing style than writing a research proposal for the National Science Foundation. Thus to write like a chemist requires that one learns to write for different audiences. This book assists young scientists in developing that essential writing skill.

  • A Field Guide to Plants of Costa Rica

    At the biological crossroads of the Americas, Costa Rica hosts one of the widest varieties of plants in the world, with habitats ranging from tidal mangrove swamps, and lowland rainforests, to dry tropical evergreen and deciduous forests. Field Guide to Plants of Costa Rica is a must-have reference guide for beginner and expert naturalists alike. It provides a thorough survey of more than 850 plant species, each entry accompanied by color photos and a concise yet detailed narrative description. Plants are conveniently grouped by the different types of vegetation: palms, tall trees, shrubs, woody vines, herbaceous vines, herbs, grasses and ferns. Along with 1400 color photographs, the guide also includes an illustrated glossary of plant parts, five maps of Costa Rica, and laminated covers for durability in the field. With so much readily accessible information, this book is essential for exploring Costa Rica's common and conspicuous flora from the plants growing along the roadside to the best natural parks.

  • The Science of Real-Time Data Capture: Self-reports in health research

    The set of techniques known collectively as real-time data capture (RTDC) is becoming increasingly important in medical research. Based on the collection of data in people's typical environments, RTDC is primarily used with self-reported data, such as medical symptoms and psychological states. Now, its guiding principles and supporting technologies also provide a framework for scientists to monitor physiological information such as heart rate, blood pressure, and skin conductance. This volume gives the most complete view yet of the state of RTDC science and its potential for use across the health and behavioural sciences.

  • The Revised Standard Version Catholic Bible, Compact Edition, Zipper Duradera

    The Revised Standard Version dramatically shaped the course of English Bible translation work in the latter half of the Twentieth Century. It is still the translation used in official Church pronouncements, and serves as the basis for the scriptural text used in the Catechism of the Catholic Church. The Oxford RSV Catholic Bible features a Presentation Section, the Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation (Dei Verbum), a section of Prayers and Devotions of the Catholic Faith and a table of Weights and Measures in the Bible. This beautiful compact bible is available at a surprisingly affordable price. The Compact Edition is perfect for travelers, students and hospital visitors, and readers on the go.

  • Oxford Latin Course

    Designed for North American students, this special version of the Oxford Latin Course combines the best features of both modern and traditional methods of Latin teaching, providing an exciting, stimulating introduction and approach to Latin based on the reading of original texts.
    In this four-volume North American edition, the order of declensions corresponds to customary U.S. usage, and the spelling has been Americanized. In addition, it offers full-color illustrations and photographs throughout Parts I and II and an expanded Teacher's Book with translations for each part. Parts I-III (now available in hardcover editions) are built around a narrative detailing the life of Horace, now based more closely on historical sources, which helps students to get to know real Romans--with their daily activities, concerns, and habits--and to develop an understanding of Roman civilization during the time of Cicero and Augustus. Part IV (paperback) is a reader consisting of extracts from Caesar, Cicero, Catullus, Virgil, Livy, and Ovid.
    The second edition of the Oxford Latin Course has been carefully designed to maximize student interest, understanding, and competence. It features a clearer presentation of grammar, revised narrative passages, new background sections, more emphasis on daily life and on the role of women, a greater number and variety of exercises, and review chapters and tests. Each chapter opens with a set of cartoons with Latin captions that illustrate new grammar points. A Latin reading follows, with new vocabulary highlighted in the margins and follow-up exercises that focus on reading comprehension and grammatical analysis. A background essay in English concludes each chapter. Covering a variety of topics--from history to food, from slavery to travel, these engaging essays present a well-rounded picture of Augustan Rome.
    The Oxford Latin Course, Second Edition offers today's students and teachers an exceptionally engaging and attractive introduction to the language, literature, and culture of Rome--one that builds skills effectively and is exciting to use.

  • The Reagan Revolution: A Very Short Introduction

    "They called it the Reagan revolution," Ronald Reagan noted in his Farewell Address. "Well, I'll accept that, but for me it always seemed more like the great rediscovery, a rediscovery of our values and our common sense." Nearly two decades after that 1989 speech, debate continues to rage over just how revolutionary those Reagan years were. The Reagan Revolution: A Very Short Introduction identifies and tackles some of the controversies and historical mysteries that continue to swirl around Reagan and his legacy, while providing an illuminating look at some of the era's defining personalities, ideas, and accomplishments. Gil Troy, a well-known historian who is a frequent commentator on contemporary politics, sheds much light on the phenomenon known as the Reagan Revolution, situating the reception of Reagan's actions within the contemporary liberal and conservative political scene. While most conservatives refuse to countenance any criticism of their hero, an articulate minority laments that he did not go far enough. And while some liberals continue to mourn just how far he went in changing America, others continue to mock him as a disengaged, do-nothing dunce. Nevertheless, as Troy shows, two and a half decades after Reagan's 1981 inauguration, his legacy continues to shape American politics, diplomacy, culture, and economics. Both Bill Clinton and George W. Bush modeled much of their presidential leadership styles on Reagan's example, while many of the debates of the '80s about the budget, tax cutting, defense-spending, and American values still rage. Love him or hate him, Ronald Reagan remains the most influential president since Franklin D. Roosevelt, and one of the most controversial. This marvelous book places the Reagan Revolution in the broader context of postwar politics, highlighting the legacies of these years on subsequent presidents and on American life today. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

  • The End of Days: Fundamentalism and the Struggle for the Temple Mount

    In this provocative work, seasoned journalist Gershom Gorenberg portrays a deadly mix of religious extremism, violence, and Mideast politics, as expressed in the struggle for the sacred center of Jerusalem. Known to Jews and Christians as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary, this thirty-five-acre enclosure at the southeast corner of Jerusalem's Old City is the most contested piece of real estate on earth. Here nationalism combines with fundamentalist faith in a volatile brew. Members of the world's three major monotheistic faiths--Judaism, Christianity, and Islam--hold this spot to be the key to salvation as they await the end of the world, and struggle to fulfill conflicting religious prophecies with dangerous political consequences. Adroitly portraying American radio evangelists of the End, radical Palestinian sheikhs, and Israeli ex-terrorists, Gorenberg explains why believers hope for the End, and why prominent American fundamentalists provide hard-line support for Israel while looking forward to the apocalypse. He makes sense of the messianic fervor that has driven some Israeli settlers to oppose peace. And he describes the Islamic apocalyptic visions that cast Israel's actions in Jerusalem as diabolic plots. The End of Days shows how conflict over Jerusalem and the fiery belief in apocalypse continue to have a potent impact on world politics and why a lasting peace in the Middle East continues to prove elusive.

  • Halloween: From Pagan Ritual to Party Night

    Boasting a rich, complex history rooted in Celtic and Christian ritual, Halloween has evolved from ethnic celebration to a blend of street festival, fright night, and vast commercial enterprise. In this colorful history, Nicholas Rogers takes a lively, entertaining look at the cultural origins and development of one of the most popular holidays of the year. Drawing on a fascinating array of sources, from classical history to Hollywood films, Rogers traces Halloween as it emerged from the Celtic festival of Samhain (summer's end), picked up elements of the Christian Hallowtide (All Saint's Day and All Soul's Day), arrived in North America as an Irish and Scottish festival, and evolved into an unofficial but large-scale holiday by the early 20th century. He examines the 1970s and '80s phenomena of Halloween sadism (razor blades in apples) and inner-city violence (arson in Detroit), as well as the immense influence of the horror film genre on the reinvention of Halloween as a terror-fest. Throughout his vivid account, Rogers shows how Halloween remains, at its core, a night of inversion, when social norms are turned upside down, and a temporary freedom of expression reigns supreme. He examines how this very license has prompted censure by the religious Right, occasional outrage from law enforcement officials, and appropriation by Left-leaning political groups. Engagingly written and based on extensive research, Halloween is the definitive history of the most bewitching day of the year, illuminating the intricate history and shifting cultural forces behind this enduring trick-or-treat holiday.

  • The Word as Scalpel: A History of Medical Sociology

    Medical Sociology is now an established subdiscipline in both medicine and sociology. This book traces the intellectual and institutional evolution of the field in relation to antecedents of the past 2000 years and developments in American sociology and medicine since the turn of the century. Drawing on his own experience as a participant and witness as well as from diverse fields, Samuel W. Bloom provides an engaging account of the ongoing search for knowledge about the relationship between illness, medicine, and society.

  • The Guardian of Every Other Right: A Constitutional History of Property Rights

    The Guardian of Every Other Right chronicles the pivotal role of property rights in fashioning the American constitutional order from the colonial era to the current controversies over eminent domain and land use controls. The book emphasizes the interplay of law, ideology, politics, and economic change in shaping constitutional thought and provides a historical perspective on the contemporary debate about property rights. Since publication of the original edition of this work, both academic and popular interest in the constitutional rights of property owners has markedly increased. Now in its third edition, this text has been revised to incorporate a full treatment of important judicial decisions, notable legislation, and scholarship since the second edition appeared in 1997. In particular, Ely provides helpful background and context for understanding the controversial Kelo decision relating to the exercise of eminent domain power for "public use." Covering the entire history of property rights in the United States, this new edition continues to fill a major gap in the literature of constitutional history and is an ideal text for students of legal and constitutional history.

  • A Casebook on Roman Family Law

    The Roman household (familia) was in many respects dramatically different from the modern family. From the early Roman Empire (30 B.C. to about A.D. 250) there survive many legal sources that describe Roman households, often in the most intimate detail. The subject matter of these ancient sources includes marriage and divorce, the property aspects of marriage, the pattern of authority within households, the transmission of property between generations, and the supervision of Roman orphans. This casebook presents 235 representative texts drawn largely from Roman legal sources, especially Justinian's Digest. These cases and the discussion questions that follow provide a good introduction to the basic legal problems associated with the ordinary families of Roman citizens. The arrangement of materials conveys to students an understanding of the basic rules of Roman family law while also providing them with the means to question these rules and explore the broader legal principles that underlie them. Included cases invite the reader to wrestle with actual Roman legal problems, as well as to think about Roman solutions in relation to modern law. In the process, the reader should gain confidence in handling fundamental forms of legal thinking, which have persisted virtually unchanged from Roman times until the present. This volume also contains a glossary of technical terms, biographies of the jurists, basic bibliographies of useful secondary literature, and a detailed introduction to the scholarly topics associated with Roman family law. A course based on this casebook should be of interest to anyone who wishes to understand better Roman social history, either as part of a larger Classical Civilization curriculum or as a preparation for law school.

  • Native American Music in Eastern North America: Includes CD

    Native American Music in Eastern North America is one of many case-study volumes that can be used along with Thinking Musically, the core book in the Global Music Series. Thinking Musically incorporates music from many diverse cultures and establishes the framework for exploring the practice of music around the world. It sets the stage for an array of case-study volumes, each of which focuses on a single area of the world. Each case study uses the contemporary musical situation as a point of departure, covering historical information and traditions as they relate to the present. Visit www.oup.com/us/globalmusic for a list of case studies in the Global Music Series. The website also includes instructional materials to accompany each study. Native American Music in Eastern North America is one of the first books to explore the contemporary musical landscape of indigenous North Americans in the north and east. It shows how performance traditions of Native North Americans have been influenced by traditional social values and cultural histories, as well as by encounters and exchanges with other indigenous groups and with newcomers from Europe and Africa. Drawing on her extensive fieldwork and on case studies from several communities--including the Iroquois, the Algonquian-speaking nations of the Atlantic seaboard, and the Inuit of the far north--author Beverley Diamond discusses intertribal celebrations, popular music projects, dance, art, and film. She also considers how technology has mediated present-day cultural communication and how traditional ideas about social roles and gender identities have been negotiated through music. Enhanced by accounts of local performances, interviews with tribal elders and First Nations performers, vivid illustrations, and hands-on listening activities, Native American Music in Eastern North America provides a captivating introduction to this under-examined topic. It is packaged with an 80-minute audio CD containing twenty-six examples of the music discussed in the book, including several rare recordings. The author has also provided a list of eighteen songs representing a wide variety of styles--from traditional Native American chants to an Inuit collaboration with Bjork--that are referenced in the book and available as an iMix at www.oup.com/us/globalmusic.

  • Science, Technology, and Society: An Encyclopedia

    Emphasizing an interdisciplinary and international coverage of the functions and effects of science and technology in society and culture, Science, Technology, and Society contains over 130 A to Z signed articles written by major scholars and experts from academic and scientific institutions and institutes worldwide. Each article is accompanied by a selected bibliography. Other features include extensive cross referencing throughout, a directory of contributors, and an extensive topical index.

  • Scandal and Civility: Journalism and the Birth of American Democracy

    A new breed of journalists came to the fore in post-revolutionary America--fiercely partisan, highly ideological, and possessed of a bold sense of vocation and purpose as they entered the fray of political debate. Often condemned by latter-day historians and widely seen in their own time as a threat to public and personal civility, these colorful figures emerge in this provocative new book as the era's most important agents of political democracy. Through incisive portraits of the most influential journalists of the 1790s--William Cobbett, Benjamin Franklin Bache, Philip Freneau, Noah Webster, John Fenno, and William Duane--Scandal and Civility moves beyond the usual cast of "revolutionary brothers" and "founding fathers" to offer a fresh perspective on a seemingly familiar story. Marcus Daniel demonstrates how partisan journalists, both Federalist and Democratic-Republican, were instrumental in igniting and expanding vital debates over the character of political leaders, the nature of representative government, and, ultimately, the role of the free press itself. Their rejection of civility and self-restraint--not even icons like George Washington were spared their satirical skewerings--earned these men the label "peddlers of scurrility." Yet, as Daniel shows, by breaking with earlier conceptions of "impartial" journalism, they challenged the elite dominance of political discourse and helped fuel the enormous political creativity of the early republic. Daniel's nuanced and penetrating narrative captures this key period of American history in all its contentious complexity. And in today's climate, when many decry media "excesses" and the relentlessly partisan and personal character of political debate, his book is a timely reminder that discord and difference were essential to the very creation of our political culture.

  • The George Gershwin Reader

    George Gershwin is one of the giants of American music, unique in that he was both a brilliant writer of popular songs and of more serious music. Here, music lovers are reated to a spectacular celebration of this great American composer. The Reader offers a kaleidoscopic collection of writings by Gershwin, as well as those about Gershwin, written by a who's who of famous commentators. More than eighty pieces of superb variety, color, and depth include the critical debate over Gershwin's concert pieces, especially "Rhapsody in Blue" and "An American in Paris." There is a complete section devoted to the controversies over "Porgy and Bess," including correspondence between Gershwin and DuBose Hayward, the opera's librettist, plus unique interviews with the original Porgy and Bess--Todd Duncan and Anne Brown. Sprinkled throughout the book are excerpts from Gershwin's own letters, which offer unique insight into this fascinating and charming man. Along with a detailed chronology of the composer's life, the editors provide informative introductions to each entry. Here is a book for anyone interested in American music. Scholars, performers, and Gershwin's legions of fans will find it an irresistible feast.

  • Music in North India: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture

    Designed for undergraduates with little or no background in world music, Music in North India is one of several volumes that can be used along with Thinking Musically, the main book in the Global Music Series, in any introductory world music or ethnomusicology course. Music in North India provides an overview of the many styles of North Indian music, from the chants of the ancient Vedas to modern devotional singing; from the serious and meditative rendering of raga to the concert-hall excitement of the modern sitar, sarod, and tabla. The text is framed around three central topics: the devotional component of North Indian music, the idea of fixity and spontaneity in the various styles of Indian music, and the importance of the verbal syllable to the expression of the musical aesthetic in North India. Featuring vivid eyewitness accounts of performances and interviews with performers, this unique volume describes the form, structure, and expression of North Indian music while also illuminating its pronounced religious and cultural significance. It is packaged with a 70-minute CD that includes examples of the music discussed in the text.

  • The Sacred Willow: Four Generations in the Life of a Vietnamese Family

    A finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, Duong Van Mai Elliott's The Sacred Willow illuminates recent Vietnamese history by weaving together the stories of the lives of four generations of her family. Beginning with her great-grandfather, who rose from rural poverty to become an influential landowner, and continuing to the present, Mai Elliott traces her family's journey through an era of tumultuous change. She tells us of childhood hours in her grandmother's silk shop, and of hiding while French troops torched her village, watching while blossoms torn by fire from the trees flutter "like hundreds of butterflies" overhead. She makes clear the agonizing choices that split Vietnamese families: her eldest sister left her staunchly anti-communist home to join the Viet Minh, and spent months sleeping in jungle camps with her infant son, fearing air raids by day and tigers by night. And she follows several family members through the last, desperate hours of the fall of Saigon-including one nephew who tried to escape by grabbing the skid of a departing American helicopter. Based on family papers, dozens of interviews, and a wealth of other research, this is not only a memorable family saga but a record of how the Vietnamese themselves have experienced their times.

  • Organizational Change in 100 Days: A Fast Forward Guide

    In an age of rapidly changing technology, shifting global opportunities, and activist shareholders, executives are expected to respond quickly. These executives are seeking tools that will allow them to keep a step ahead of changes in the business environment, because they are critically aware of the fact that slow change equals slow death.Organizational Change in 100 Days: A Fast Forward Guide is one such tool. Developed to be used as a companion to Fast Forward: Organizational Change in 100 Days, this book provides exercises and worksheets that will allow the reader to develop and implement a plan for organizational change. This guide's flexible format can be used either in groups or by individuals, and will be especially useful to facilitators, trainers, and consultants who work with companies on change strategies.

  • Prolonged Exposure Therapy for PTSD

    This guide gives clinicians the information they need to treat clients who exhibit the symptoms of PTSD. It is based on the principles of Prolonged Exposure Therapy, the most scientifically-tested and proven treatment that has been used to effectively treat victims of all types of trauma. Whether your client is a veteran of combat, a victim of a physical or sexual assault, or a casualty of a motor vehicle accident, the techniques and strategies outlined in this book will help. In this treatment clients are exposed to imagery of their traumatic memories, as well as real-life situations related to the traumatic event in a step-by-step, controllable way. Through these exposures, your client will learn to confront the trauma and begin to think differently about it, leading to a marked decrease in levels of anxiety and other PTSD symptoms. Clients are provided education about PTSD and other common reactions to traumatic events. Breathing retraining is taught as a method for helping the client manage anxiety in daily life. Designed to be used in conjunction with the corresponding client workbook, this therapist guide includes all the tools necessary to effectively implement the prolonged exposure program including assessment measures, session outlines, case studies, sample dialogues, and homework assignments. This comprehensive resource is an exceptional treatment manual that is sure to help you help your clients reclaim their lives from PTSD.

  • Becoming Hebrew: The Creation of a Jewish National Culture in Ottoman Palestine

    'If the Jews wish to become a nation of Jewish Culture,' Eliezer Ben-Yehuda wrote in 1904, 'they must first become truly a nation.' Throughout the subsequent decade, he and other Zionist activists in Palestine--with the help of others elsewhere--attempted to transform what they perceived to be a dispersed and divided mass into the seeds of a modern nation. In this book, Arieh Bruce Saposnik tells the story of how they did it. While there has been a great deal of study of Zionist ideas of this period, Saposnik turns his focus elsewhere, showing how thee ideas were put into practice by Zionist activists in Palestine. The period from 1903-1914, he argues, was critical to the building of the infrastructure of national culture. Moreover, he shows, these activists did not attempt to build a traditional Jewish culture in a new place, but sought to effect a dramatic revolution in all aspects of Jewish life--a revolution with a complex relationship to traditional Jewish discourses, practices, and liturgy. Their view of 'culture' was expansive, involving all aspects of life, and both high culture and popular culture. Their revolution changed everything from the way they dressed to the art they created, from the holidays they celebrated to the language they spoke and the accent with which they spoke it. It also included politics, economics, medicine, and much more. Saposnik attempts to recapture this comprehensive view of culture and to show how images and ideas were translated into concrete cultural institutions, new art, rituals, language, and more.

  • Green Chemistry Using Liquid and Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    There has been much research on the potential of liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide for environmentally safe applications. This edited volume will cover the various applications of using these forms of carbon dioxide. The three main areas of focus are catalysis and chemical synthesis in CO2, polymers in CO2, and industrial processes and applications utilizing CO2. The book is aimed at researchers in academia and industry, and the contributors are all experts in the field.

  • Legislating Morality: Pluralism and Religious Identity in Lawmaking

    A recurring issue in American political life is the role that religion plays in public law making. While many believe that religious voices have been unjustly suppressed in public life and should be accorded a more prominent role in the making of public policy, others argue that religion (Christianity in particular) is already such an institutionalised part of American public life that religious minorities can sometimes be made to feel like outsiders. In this thorough and thoughtful book, Lucinda Peach sheds new light on this discussion by proposing a fresh and pragmatic alternative: recognising the value of liberal arguments about the importance of religious diversity, on the one hand, she gives equal weight to communitarian concerns about the centrality of religion to moral and political identity, on the other. Defending compromise, she proposes that lawmakers incorporate different viewpoints into the process of forging crucial legislative decisions. But Legislating Morality's most original quality lies in the feminist perspective with which it addresses the general issue of how conflicts between religious identity and constitutional rights can be resolved in lawmaking. Groundbreaking and comprehensive, this book will be recognised across disciplines as a significant contribution to public policy, religious ethics and the law.

  • The Old Testament: A Very Short Introduction

    Eminent biblical scholar Michael D. Coogan offers here a wide-ranging and stimulating exploration of the Old Testament, illuminating its importance as history, literature, and sacred text. Coogan explains the differences between the Bible of Jewish tradition (the "Hebrew Bible") and the Old Testament of Christianity, and also examines the different contents of the Bibles used by Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox Christians, and Protestants. He looks at the rise of modern biblical scholarship as well as the recovery of ancient Near Eastern literatures and their significance for biblical interpretation. One particularly interesting section examines three principal characters of the Old Testament--Abraham, Deborah, and David--illuminating important themes connected with them, such as Abraham and covenant and David as poet and warrior. Coogan explores the use of invented dialogue and historical fiction in the Old Testament, the presence of mythic elements in apparently historical accounts, and the relationship of ancient Israelite myths to those of their neighbors. The book considers the Old Testament's idea of divine justice, especially in Ecclesiastes and Job, and looks at notions of the afterlife in the ancient Near East and in ancient Israel. Coogan highlights the significance of the history and literature of the Old Testament and describes how non-biblical evidence, such as archaeological data and texts, has placed the Old Testament in a larger and more illuminating context. The book also discusses law and ritual in the Bible as well as the biblical understandings of prophecy. Here then is a marvelous overview of one of the great pillars of Western religion and culture, a book whose significance has endured for thousands of years and which remains vitally important today for Jews, Christians, and Muslims worldwide. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

  • Hoofprint of the Ox: Principles of the Chan Buddhist Path as Taught by a Modern Chinese Master

    Revered by Buddhists in the United States and China, Master Sheng-yen shares his wisdom and teachings in this first comprehensive English primer of Chan, the Chinese tradition of Buddhism that inspired Japanese Zen. Often mistunderstood as a system of mind games, the Chan path leads to enlightenment through apparent contradiction. while demanding the mental and physical discipline of traditional Buddhist doctrine, it asserts that wisdom (Buddha-nature) is innate and immediate in all living beings, and thus not to be achieved through devotion to the strictures of religious practice. You arrive without departing. Master Sheng-yen provides an unprecedented understanding of Chan, its precepts, and its practice. Beginning with a basic overview of Buddhism and meditation, 'Hoofprint of the Ox' detials the progressive mental exercises traditionally followed by all Buddhists. Known as the Three Disciplines, these procedures develop moral purity, meditiative concentration, and enlightening insight through the 'stilling' of the mind. Master Sheng-yen then expounds Chan Buddhism, recounting its centuries-old history in China and illuminating its fundamental tenets. He contemplates the nature of Buddhahood, specifies the physical and mental prerequisites for beginning Chan practice, and humbly considers what it means to be an enlightened Chan master. Drawing its title from a famous series of pictures that symbolizes the Chan path as the search of an ox-herd for his wayward ox, 'Hoofprint of the Ox' is an inspirational guide to self-discovery through mental transformation. A profound contribution to Western understanding of Chan and Zen, this book is intended for practicing Buddhists as well as anyone interested in learning about the Buddhist path.

  • Minds on Trial: Great cases in law and psychology

    Everyday, in courtrooms everywhere, people's lives are touched and shaped by judgments and verdicts influenced by the testimony of psychologists and other mental health experts. This casebook details 20 high-profile court cases that turned, at least in part, on the expertise of forensic psychologists and psychiatrists and involved such psychological issues as insanity, criminal profiling, capital punishment, competence to stand trial, infanticide, domestic violence, false confessions, and psychological autopsies. The defendents in these cases range from household names such as Woodly Allen, Mike Tyson, Patty Hearst, and Jeffrey Dahmer to others whose brief brush with infamy has long been forgotten. But regardless of their notoriety or celebrity status, each of these carefully selected cases teaches important lessons about the role that psychology and the other behavioral sciences play in our legal system.

  • Textbook of Palliative Nursing

    Originally published in 2001, the Textbook of Palliative Nursing has become the standard text for the field of hospice and palliative care nursing. In this new edition, the authors and editors have updated each chapter to ensure that the content is evidence-based and current references are included. They also have retained the important focus on case studies throughout the text and practical, clinically-relevant tables, figures, and other resources. Like the previous edition, this text has an introductory section of the general principles of palliative care followed by a comprehensive section on symptom assessment and management encompassing twenty-one different symptoms. Other key sections include psychosocial support and spiritual care, providing a holistic perspective on care of patients facing advanced disease. The text also includes an innovative section on special populations addressing those most in need of palliative care. The textbook is a useful resource for all nurses with the excellent section on end-of-life care across settings. In this new edition, the paediatric palliative care section has been greatly expanded and includes seven separate chapters on paediatric care. It includes a section on "special issues" addressing topics such as ethical considerations, nursing research, and public policy perspectives and concludes with a section presenting models of excellence including six international models. This edition also offers a narrative on dying based on a spouse's perspective. The text includes an appendix with an extensive list of resources for nurses in the field.

  • Mastery of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Client Workbook: A cognitive-behavioral approach

    This workbook will help clients recognize symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder and develop and put into practice a program of exercises to reduce these symptoms.

  • Women's Lives, Women's Rituals in the Hindu Tradition

    In this book, eleven leading scholars of Hinduism will explore the complex relationship between Hindu women's ritual activities and their lives beyond ritual.

  • Real Enemies: Conspiracy Theories and American Democracy, World War I to 9/11

    Many Americans believe that their own government is guilty of shocking crimes. Government agents shot the president. They faked the moon landing. They stood by and allowed the murders of 2,400 servicemen in Hawaii--or 3,000 civilians in New York. In their zeal to cover up their crimes, they killed witnesses, faked evidence, and stole into secure offices to snatch incriminating documents from the files. Although the paranoid style has been a feature of the American scene since the birth of the Republic, in Real Enemies, Kathryn Olmsted shows that it is only in the twentieth century that strange and unlikely conspiracy theories have become central to American politics. While Americans had worried about bankers, Jews, and Catholics for decades, Olmsted sees World War I as a critical turning point for conspiracy theories. As the federal government expanded, Americans grew more fearful of the government itself--the military, the intelligence community, and even the President. Perhaps more important, Olmsted examines why so many Americans believe that their government conspires against them, why more people believe these theories over time, and how real conspiracies by government officials--such as the infamous Northwoods plan--have fueled our paranoia about the government. She analyzes Pearl Harbor, Cold War and anticommunist plots, the JFK assassination, Watergate, and 9/11. Along the way, she introduces readers to a lively cast of characters, from the Nobel prize-winning scientist who became a leading conspiracist to a housewife who believed she could unlock the secrets of the JFK assassination. Polls show that thirty-six percent of Americans think that George W. Bush knew in advance of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Real Enemies, an engaging work on a timely, important topic, sheds light on such theories, revealing how the rampant fear of conspiracy at once invigorates and undermines American democracy.

  • Child Protection in America: Past, Present, and Future

    Child abuse and neglect are intractable problems exacting a terrible toll on children and rending the very fabric of our society. What can be done to reduce the suffering? If there were simple solutions to abuse and neglect they would have been discovered long ago. There are no easy answers, but in this vivid history of child protection in America, John E.B. Myers introduces realistic policies that will reduce maltreatment and strengthen the system that protects our children. Before it is possible to design viable improvements in today's system, it is necessary to understand how it evolved. The sweeping, beautifully written account of child protection in America traces its growth from colonial days to the present--from the rise and gradual disappearance of orphanages, the growth of foster care, the birth of organized child protection in 1874, and the rise of private societies to prevent cruelty, to the twentieth-century transition to government-operated child protection. Myers goes on to describe the principal causes of child maltreatment, including intergenerational transmission of violence, poverty, substance abuse, cultural violence, excessive corporal punishment, sexual deviance, evolution, mental illness, and domestic violence. Once the causes of maltreatment are clear, it is possible to create solutions. Some of the proposals outlined have been in play for more than a century, while others are new. Policies to combat poverty, expand nurse home visiting programs, increase access to day care, strengthen a sense of community, outlaw corporal punishment, rethink our attitude toward alcohol, and lower the toxicity in popular culture are rooted in a deep understanding of the cycle of violence and challenge traditional ways of thinking. Since it will never be possible to prevent all maltreatment, it is critical to strengthen the existing child protection system. Attainable reforms such as dealing with the lingering effects of racism in the child welfare, reworking funding mechanisms, refocusing leadership, creating a less adversarial system, strengthening foster care, and reinventing the juvenile court point to flaws in our system but demonstrate that progress is possible. This provocative book will challenge all those concerned with children's welfare to move toward real solutions that will make life better for America's most vulnerable children.

  • Thomas Mann's The Magic Mountain: A Casebook

    This collection seeks to illustrate the ways in which Thomas Mann's 1924 novel, The Magic Mountain, has been newly construed by some of today's most astute readers in the field of Mann studies. The essays, many of which were written expressly for this volume, comment on some of the familiar and inescapable topics of Magic Mountain scholarship, including the questions of genre and ideology, the philosophy of time, and the ominous subjects of disease and medical practice. Moreover, this volume offers fresh approaches to the novels underlying notions of masculinity, to its embodiment of the cultural code of anti-Semitism, and to its precarious relationship to the rival media of photography, cinema, and recorded sound.

  • Orson Welles's Citizen Kane: A Casebook

    Citizen Kane is arguable the most admired and significant film since the advent of talking pictures. To study it even briefly is to learn a great deal about American history, motion-picture style, and the literary aspects of motion-picture scripts. This volume will represent the essential writings on Kane. It gives the reader a lively set of critical interpretations, together with the necessary production information, historical background, and technical understanding to comprehend the film's larger cultural significance.

  • From Jim Crow to Civil Rights: The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality

    A monumental investigation of the Supreme Court's rulings on race, From Jim Crow To Civil Rights spells out in compelling detail the political and social context within which the Supreme Court Justices operate and the consequences of their decisions for American race relations. In a highly provocative interpretation of the decision's connection to the civil rights movement, Klarman argues that Brown was more important for mobilizing southern white opposition to racial change than for encouraging direct-action protest. Brown unquestioningly had a significant impact--it brought race issues to public attention and it mobilized supporters of the ruling. It also, however, energized the opposition. In this authoritative account of constitutional law concerning race, Michael Klarman details, in the richest and most thorough discussion to date, how and whether Supreme Court decisions do, in fact, matter.

  • Polio: An American Story

    All who lived in the early 1950s remember the fear of polio and the elation felt when a successful vaccine was found. Now David Oshinsky tells the gripping story of the polio terror and of the intense effort to find a cure, from the March of Dimes to the discovery of the Salk and Sabin vaccines--and beyond. Here is a remarkable portrait of America in the early 1950s, using the widespread panic over polio to shed light on our national obsessions and fears. Drawing on newly available papers of Jonas Salk, Albert Sabin and other key players, Oshinsky paints a suspenseful portrait of the race for the cure, weaving a dramatic tale centered on the furious rivalry between Salk and Sabin. Indeed, the competition was marked by a deep-seated ill will among the researchers that remained with them until their deaths. The author also tells the story of Isabel Morgan, perhaps the most talented of all polio researchers, who might have beaten Salk to the prize if she had not retired to raise a family. As backdrop to this feverish research, Oshinsky offers an insightful look at the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, which was founded in the 1930s by FDR and Basil O'Connor. The National Foundation revolutionized fundraising and the perception of disease in America, using "poster children" and the famous March of Dimes to raise hundreds of millions of dollars from a vast army of contributors (instead of a few well-heeled benefactors), creating the largest research and rehabilitation network in the history of medicine. The polio experience also revolutionized the way in which the government licensed and tested new drugs before allowing them on the market, and the way in which the legal system dealt with manufacturers' liability for unsafe products. Finally, and perhaps most tellingly, Oshinsky reveals that polio was never the raging epidemic portrayed by the media, but in truth a relatively uncommon disease. But in baby-booming America--increasingly suburban, family-oriented, and hygiene-obsessed--the specter of polio, like the specter of the atomic bomb, soon became a cloud of terror over daily life. Both a gripping scientific suspense story and a provocative social and cultural history, Polio opens a fresh window onto postwar America.

  • The End of Early Music: A Period Performer's History of Music for the Twenty-First Century

    Part history, part explanation of early music, this book also plays devil's advocate, criticizing current practices and urging experimentation. Haynes, a veteran of the movement, describes a vision of the future that involves improvisation, rhetorical expression, and composition. Written for musicians and non-musicians alike.

  • Theory of Machines and Mechanisms

    Theory of Machines and Mechanisms, Third Edition, is a comprehensive study of rigid-body mechanical systems and provides background for continued study in stress, strength, fatigue, life, modes of failure, lubrication and other advanced aspects of the design of mechanical systems. This third edition provides the background, notation, and nomenclature essential for students to understand the various and independent technical approaches that exist in the field of mechanisms, kinematics, and dynamics of machines. The authors employ all methods of analysis and development, with balanced use of graphical and analytic methods. New material includes an introduction of kinematic coefficients, which clearly separates kinematic (geometric) effects from speed or dynamic dependence. At the suggestion of users, the authors have included no written computer programs, allowing professors and students to write their own and ensuring that the book does not become obsolete as computers and programming languages change. Part I introduces theory, nomenclature, notation, and methods of analysis. It describes all aspects of a mechanism (its nature, function, classification, and limitations) and covers kinematic analyses (position, velocity, and acceleration). Part II shows the engineering applications involved in the selection, specification, design, and sizing of mechanisms that accomplish specific motion objectives. It includes chapters on cam systems, gears, gear trains, synthesis of linkages, spatial mechanisms, and robotics. Part III presents the dynamics of machines and the consequences of the proposed mechanism design specifications. New dynamic devices whose functions cannot be explained or understood without dynamic analysis are included. This third edition incorporates entirely new chapters on the analysis and design of flywheels, governors, and gyroscopes.

  • The Winning Brief

    Good writing wins court cases- The Winning Brief is proof. Now, Bryan Garner brings us a revised and updated version of his modern classic. In 100 concise, practical, easy-to-use sections, legal writing guru Bryan A. Garner goes step-by-step through the art of effective legal writing. He covers it all - from the rules for planning and organizing a brief to openers that can capture a judge's attention from the first few words. "Never write a sentence that you couldn't easily speak" Garner warns - and he shows how to do that. He gives masterly advice on building sound paragraphs, drafting crisp sentences, choosing the best words ("Strike pursuant to from your vocabulary."), quoting authority, citing sources, and designing a document that looks as impressive as it reads. Throughout, he shows how to edit for maximal impact, using vivid before-and-after examples that apply the basics of rhetoric to persuasive writing. Filled with examples of good and bad writing from actual briefs filed in courts of all types, the book also covers the new appellate rules for preparing federal briefs. Including new sections on the ever-changing rules of acceptable legal writing, Garner's new edition keeps lawyers on their toes and writing the briefs that win cases. An invaluable resource for attorneys, law clerks, judges, paralegals, and law students and their teachers. The Winning Brief has the qualities that make Garner's book so successful: authority, accessibility, and page after page of tips and techniques that work.

  • Envy: The Seven Deadly Sins

    Part of a series of highly entertaining books on the history of sinning. While each of the other six deadly sins area a guilty pleasure, 'the green-eyed monster', as it is often called, is no fun. Jacob Epstein considers what the experts have written about envy, schadenfreude, and resentment, and how it operates under different political systems. Why is it so powerful that it can so easily overpower sense and caution? Could it ever be wiped from the map of humankind's nastier emotions? The author bravely offers his own experiences of envy, and his prescription for removing it from one's psychic economy. This is a refreshingly honest and very entertaining account of a very old sin.

  • Elements of Quantum Mechanics

    This is a textbook in Quantum Mechanics designed for courses taught in Chemistry, Physics, Chemical Engineering, and Materials Science. The course is commonly taken by advanced undergraduate and first year graduate students. The book is intended to be taught in one semester or in one quarter or extended lectures, and is designed to treat the major topics in some depth. The text is challenging and includes exercises aimed to encourage thought and provide a solid grounding in the fundamentals of many aspects of quantum mechanics. It's emphasis is on a general approach that does not focus mainly on the Schrodinger representation of quantum theory, as well as a more extensive consideration of time dependent problems that is usually provided in a first graduate course. Throughout the book, a sufficient amount of mathematical detail and classical mechanics background is provided to enable readers to follow the quantum mechanical developments and analysis of physical phenomena. The book will provide a solid grounding in the fundamentals of quantum mechanics, and it explicates a variety of physical problems that are key components to understanding broad areas of physical science. This book will bring readers to the point where they can focus their future efforts on more specialized topics in quantum theory.

  • The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past

    What is history and why should we study it? Is there such a thing as historical truth? Is history a science? One of the most accomplished historians at work today, John Lewis Gaddis, answers these and other questions in this short, witty, and humane book. The Landscape of History provides a searching look at the historian's craft, as well as a strong argument for why a historical consciousness should matter to us today. Gaddis points out that while the historical method is more sophisticated than most historians realize, it doesn't require unintelligible prose to explain. Like cartographers mapping landscapes, historians represent what they can never replicate. In doing so, they combine the techniques of artists, geologists, paleontologists, and evolutionary biologists. Their approaches parallel, in intriguing ways, the new sciences of chaos, complexity, and criticality. They don't much resemble what happens in the social sciences, where the pursuit of independent variables functioning with static systems seems increasingly divorced from the world as we know it. So who's really being scientific and who isn't? This question too is one Gaddis explores, in ways that are certain to spark interdisciplinary controversy. Written in the tradition of Marc Bloch and E.H. Carr, The Landscape of History is at once an engaging introduction to the historical method for beginners, a powerful reaffirmation of it for practitioners, a startling challenge to social scientists, and an effective skewering of post-modernist claims that we can't know anything at all about the past. It will be essential reading for anyone who reads, writes, teaches, or cares about history.

  • The World's Greatest Fix: A History of Nitrogen and Agriculture

    The World's Greatest Fix: A History of Nitrogen and Agriculture tells the story of how humans have used their ingenuity throughout history to maintain soil fertility, and to avoid famine through productive agriculture. It starts with a layman's guide to the relevant chemistry of nitrogen and shows how the development of towns and fixed settlements meant that methods had to be found to maintain the fertility of fields exploited year after year. The way this was done, in purely empirical fashion, is described for the Chinese, the Incas, the Mayas, and the Romans. Author G. J. Leigh then examines the development of agriculture in England, including the use of field rotations. The gradual evolution of more sophisticated methods of land management is covered, emphasizing the use of fertilizers, the early development of chemistry with the realization of the modern concepts of elements and the contributions of plants and animals, and the establishment of agricultural science by Davy and Von Liebig. Leigh explains how we have arrived at our current understanding of biological nitrogen fixation through the efforts of generations of dedicated farmers and researchers. Later chapters deal with the birth of the nitrogen fixation industry and the political and economic consequences of it in Europe (First World War) and South America (guano and nitrate). The World's Greatest Fix shows how industrial fixation has developed from a laboratory process newly discovered at the beginning of the twentieth century into the impressive and sophisticated procedure in use today. Finally, the value of industrial nitrate to help feed the current world population and the environmental consequences of nitrate pollution in waters is discussed.

  • Harsh Justice: Criminal Punishment and the Widening Divide between America and Europe

    Criminal punishment in America is harsh and degrading--more so than anywhere else in the liberal west. Executions and long prison terms are commonplace in America. Countries like France and Germany, by contrast, are systematically mild. European offenders are rarely sent to prison, and when they are, they serve far shorter terms than their American counterparts. Why is America so comparatively harsh? In this novel work of comparative legal history, James Whitman argues that the answer lies in America's triumphant embrace of a non-hierarchical social system and distrust of state power which have contributed to a law of punishment that is more willing to degrade offenders.

  • Death of a Generation: How the Assassinations of Diem and JFK Prolonged the Vietnam War

    When John F. Kennedy was shot, millions were left to wonder how America, and the world, would have been different had he lived to fulfill the enormous promise of his presidency. For many historians and political observers, what Kennedy would and would not have done in Vietnam has been a source of enduring controversy. Now, based on convincing new evidence--including a startling revelation about the Kennedy administration's involvement in the assassination of Premier Diem--Howard Jones argues that Kennedy intended to withdraw the great bulk of American soldiers and pursue a diplomatic solution to the crisis in Vietnam. Drawing upon recently declassified hearings by the Church Committee on the U.S. role in assassinations, newly released tapes of Kennedy White House discussions, and interviews with John Kenneth Galbraith, Robert McNamara, Dean Rusk, and others from the president's inner circle, Jones shows that Kennedy firmly believed that the outcome of the war depended on the South Vietnamese. In the spring of 1962, he instructed Secretary of Defense McNamara to draft a withdrawal plan aimed at having all special military forces home by the end of 1965. The "Comprehensive Plan for South Vietnam" was ready for approval in early May 1963, but then the Buddhist revolt erupted and postponed the program. Convinced that the war was not winnable under Diem's leadership, President Kennedy made his most critical mistake--promoting a coup as a means for facilitating a U.S. withdrawal. In the cruelest of ironies, the coup resulted in Diem's death followed by a state of turmoil in Vietnam that further obstructed disengagement. Still, these events only confirmed Kennedy's view about South Vietnam's inability to win the war and therefore did not lessen his resolve to reduce the U.S. commitment. By the end of November, however, the president was dead and Lyndon Johnson began his campaign of escalation. Jones argues forcefully that if Kennedy had not been assassinated, his withdrawal plan would have spared the lives of 58,000 Americans and countless Vietnamese. Written with vivid immediacy, supported with authoritative research, Death of a Generation answers one of the most profoundly important questions left hanging in the aftermath of John F. Kennedy's death.

  • The Heart and the Fountain: An Anthology of Jewish Mystical Experiences

    Joseph Dan is one of the world's leading authorities on Jewish mysticism. In this superb anthology, Dan not only presents illuminating excerpts from the most important mystical texts, but also delves into the very meaning of mysticism itself. Dan takes readers through the historical development of Jewish mysticism, from late antiquity to the modern period. He explores the Kabbalah, the esoteric tradition that delves into the secrets delivered by God to Moses on Mount Sinai, the emergence of Hasidism, and much more. He presents the great texts, from Hekhalot Rabbati, "The Greater Book of Divine Palaces," set in the temple in Jerusalem; to the apocalyptic vision of Abraham Abulafia in the thirteenth century; to the Zohar, perhaps the best-known volume of all. For each piece, he offers an extended introduction that deftly places the work in the context of its time and its antecedents. "Mysticism is that which cannot be expressed in words, period," Dan writes. In this remarkable volume, he guides us through that seemingly impenetrable barrier to show how the inexpressible has been expressed in some of the most profound and challenging writing in existence.

  • Games and Decision Making

    Games and Decision Making, Second Edition, is a unique blend of decision theory and game theory. From classical optimization to modern game theory, authors Charalambos D. Aliprantis and Subir K. Chakrabarti show the importance of mathematical knowledge in understanding and analyzing issues in decision making. Through an imaginative selection of topics, Aliprantis and Chakrabarti treat decision and game theory as part of one body of knowledge. They move from problems involving the individual decision-maker to progressively more complex problems such as sequential rationality, auctions, and bargaining. By building each chapter on material presented earlier, the authors offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of these topics. Successfully class-tested in an advanced undergraduate course at the Krannert School of Management and in a graduate course in economics at Indiana University, Games and Decision Making, Second Edition, is an essential text for advanced undergraduates and graduate students of decision theory and game theory. The book is accessible to students who have a good basic understanding of elementary calculus and probability theory. New to this Edition * Chapter 2 includes new sections on two-person games, best-response strategies, mixed strategies, and incomplete information * Chapter 4 has been expanded to provide new material on behavior strategies and applications * The chapter on auctions (5) includes a new section on revenue equivalence * Offers two new chapters, on repeated games (7) and existence results (9) * New applications have been added to all the chapters

  • Electric Machinery and Transformers

    This is a revision of Guru/Hiziroglu: Electric Machinery and Transformers, 2/E. The text is designed for the standard third or fourth year (junior/senior) course in electrical engineering commonly called electric machinery or electromechanical energy conversion. This text discusses the principles behind building the primary infrastructure for the generation of electricity (such as hydroelectric dams, turbines, etc.) that supplies the energy needs of people throughout the world. In addition to power generation, the book covers the basics of various types of electric motors, from large electric train motors, to those in hair dryers and smaller devices. The largest markets for a book such as this will be found in countries with developing infrastructures. The text is best known for its accuracy, pedagogy, and clear writing style. This revision should make Electric Machinery and Transformers the most up-to-date text on the market. Electric Machinery and Transformers continues its strong pedagogical tradition with a wealth of examples, new exercises, review questions, and effective chapter summaries. Electric Machinery and Transformers begins with a review of the basics of circuit theory and electromagnetics. Chapter 3 begins the heart of the course with the principles of electromehcanical energy conversion; Chapter 4 covers transformers; Chapters 5 & 6 cover direct current generators and motors; Chapters 7 & 8 cover synchronous generators and motors. Chapters 9 and 10 round out the motors coverage with an introduction to polyphase induction motors and single-phase motors. Finally, Chapter 11 deals with dynamics of electrics machines and Chapter 12 covers special purpoe machines. This revised second edition features updated examples for modern applications, new problems, and additional material on power electronics. An instructor's manual will accompany the main text and will be available free to adopters.

  • Political Keywords: Using Language that Uses Us

    The Declaration of Independence states that all men are created equal in the United States, but that statement does not hold true for words. Some words carry more weight than others--they seem to work harder, get more done, and demand more respect. Political Keywords: Using Language that Uses Us looks at eight dominant words that are crucial to American political discourse, and how they have been employed during the last fifty years. Based on an analysis of eleven separate studies of political language, Political Keywords helps readers to understand what these terms mean and how they are used. For example, the book tracks what politics now means to modern commentators, how schoolteacher impress certain values upon the nation's children by invoking the office of the president, and why an innocent word like government sometimes makes people so upset. It details how the people are referenced in political talk and how the media portray themselves. The book also considers the work done by political parties, political promises, and political consultants because, together, they shed special light on modern elections. Combining social science with subtle forms of cultural interpretation, Political Keywords: Using Language that Uses Us provides a fresh look at both American politics and American language. It is an ideal text for undergraduate and graduate courses in political communication, political language, political campaigns, media and politics, political psychology, public opinion, rhetorical criticism, contemporary public address, and presidential rhetoric.

  • The Naked Voice: A Wholistic Approach to Singing

    In The Naked Voice, W. Stephen Smith invites all singers to improve their vocal technique through his renowned and time-tested wholistic method. Focusing not only on the most important technical, but also on the often overlooked psychological and spiritual elements of learning to sing, his book allows readers to develop their own full and individual identities as singers. With philosophies and techniques drawn from a lifetime of teaching voice, Smith demonstrates how one can reveal the true unique sound of one's own voice by singing with the whole self. The master's method, presented in concrete and comprehensible terms with helpful illustrations, is enhanced by a CD containing exercises performed by singers from Smith's own studio-singers whose talent and training bring them across the USA and around the world. The clear and easy style of The Naked Voice welcomes the reader into Smith's teaching studio, and into conversation with Smith himself as he presents the six simple and elegant exercises that form the core of his method. These exercises provide a foundation for free singing, and lead singers through the step-by-step process of mastering the technique. Throughout, Smith speaks sympathetically and encouragingly to the singer in search of an unencumbered and effective approach to the art. The Naked Voice is a must-read for all singers, giving teachers and students, amateurs and professionals, access to the methods and concepts that have earned Smith his reputation as one of the most highly-sought-after vocal instructors in the international arena today.

  • The American Dream and the Public Schools

    The American Dream and the Public Schools examines issues that have excited and divided Americans for years, including desegregation, school funding, testing, vouchers, bilingual education, and ability grouping. While these are all separate problems, much of the contention over them comes down to the same thing--an apparent conflict between policies designed to promote each student's ability to succeed and those designed to insure the good of all students or the nation as a whole. The authors show how policies to promote individual success too often benefit only those already privileged by race or class, and often conflict with policies that are intended to benefit everyone. They propose a framework that builds on our nation's rapidly changing population in order to help Americans get past acrimonious debates about schooling. Their goal is to make public education work better so that all children can succeed.

  • Happiness: Classic and Contemporary Readings in Philosophy

    Happiness has long been a focus of attention for philosophers as well as psychologists. This volume, the only collection devoted to the subject from the standpoint of philosophy, offers twenty-seven classic and contemporary readings exploring the nature of happiness. Part I, a survey of the ways happiness has been treated throughout the history of ethics, includes writings by Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Seneca, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas Hobbes, Joseph Butler, David Hume, Jeremy Bentham, Immanuel Kant, Arthur Schopenhauer, John Stuart Mill, Henry Sidgwick, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Jean-Paul Sartre. Part II explores the work of contemporary ethical theorists, including Julia Annas, John Kekes, Richard Kraut, Robert Nozick, and Richard Taylor. The book also includes an introduction by psychologist Daniel Nettle, headnotes for each selection, and essays by the editors. Ideal for ethics courses, Happiness: Classic and Contemporary Readings can also be used in courses in introductory philosophy and positive psychology.

  • Brown v. Board of Education: A Civil Rights Milestone and Its Troubled Legacy

    Many people were elated when Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren delivered Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka in May 1954, the ruling that struck down state-sponsored racial segregation in America's public schools. Thurgood Marshall, chief attorney for the black families that launched the litigation, exclaimed later, "I was so happy, I was numb." The novelist Ralph Ellison wrote, "another battle of the Civil War has been won. The rest is up to us and I'm very glad. What a wonderful world of possibilities are unfolded for the children!" Here, in a concise, compelling narrative, Bancroft Prize-winning historian James T. Patterson takes readers through the dramatic case and its fifty-year aftermath. A wide range of characters animates the story, from the little-known African-Americans who dared to challenge Jim Crow with lawsuits (at great personal cost); to Thurgood Marshall, who later became a Justice himself; to Earl Warren, who shepherded a fractured Court to a unanimous decision. Others include segregationist politicians like Governor Orval Faubus of Arkansas; Presidents Eisenhower, Johnson, and Nixon; and controversial Supreme Court justices such as William Rehnquist and Clarence Thomas. Most Americans still see Brown as a triumph--but was it? Patterson shrewdly explores the provocative questions that still swirl around the case. Could the Court--or President Eisenhower--have done more to ensure compliance with Brown? Did the decision touch off the modern civil rights movement? How useful are court-ordered busing and affirmative action against racial segregation? To what extent has racial mixing affected the academic achievement of black children? Where indeed do we go from here to realize the expectations of Marshall, Ellison, and others in 1954?

  • The Moment of Proof: Mathematical Epiphanies

    When Archimedes, while bathing, suddenly hit upon the principle of buoyancy, he ran wildly through the streets of Syracuse, stark naked, crying "eureka!" In The Moment of Proof, Donald Benson attempts to convey to general readers the feeling of eureka--the joy of discovery--that mathematicians feel when they first encounter an elegant proof. This is not an introduction to mathematics so much as an introduction to the pleasures of mathematical thinking. And indeed the delights of this book are many and varied. The book is packed with intriguing conundrums--Loyd's Fifteen Puzzle, the Petersburg Paradox, the Chaos Game, the Monty Hall Problem, the Prisoners' Dilemma--as well as many mathematical curiosities. We learn how to perform the arithmetical proof called "casting out nines" and are introduced to Russian peasant multiplication, a bizarre way to multiply numbers that actually works. The book shows us how to calculate the number of ways a chef can combine ten or fewer spices to flavor his soup (1,024) and how many people we would have to gather in a room to have a 50-50 chance of two having the same birthday (23 people). But most important, Benson takes us step by step through these many mathematical wonders, so that we arrive at the solution much the way a working scientist would--and with much the same feeling of surprise. Every fan of mathematical puzzles will be enthralled by The Moment of Proof. Indeed, anyone interested in mathematics or in scientific discovery in general will want to own this book.

  • The Sun, The Genome, and The Internet: Tools of Scientific Revolution

    In this visionary look into the future, Freeman Dyson argues that technological changes fundamentally alter our ethical and social arrangements and that three rapidly advancing new technologies -- solar energy, genetic engineering, and worldwide communication -- together have the potential to create a more equal distribution of the world's wealth. Dyson begins by rejecting the idea that scientific revolutions are primarily concept driven. He shows rather that new tools are more often the sparks that ignite scientific discovery. Such tool-driven revolutions have profound social consequences: the invention of the telescope turning the medieval view of the world upside down, the widespread use of household appliances in the 1950s replacing servants, to cite just two examples. In looking ahead, Dyson suggests that solar energy, genetics, and the Internet will have similarly transformative effects, with the potential to produce a more just and equitable society. Solar power could bring electricity to even the poorest, most remote areas of third-world nations, allowing everyone access to the vast stores of information on the Internet and effectively ending the cultural isolation of the poorest countries. Similarly, breakthroughs in genetics may well enable us to give our children healthier lives and grow more efficient crops, thus restoring the economic and human vitality of village cultures devalued and dislocated by the global market. Written with passionate conviction about the ethical uses of science, The Sun, The Genome, and The Internet is both a brilliant reinterpretation of the scientific process and a challenge to use new technologies to close, rather than widen, the gap between rich and poor.

  • Clinical Epidemiology: The study of the outcome of illness

    Examining the principles and methods of research on the evaluation of factors affecting the outcome of illness, this book emphasizes diagnostic and therapeutic interventions - the factors most readily modified by health care providers. It discusses the various ways of structuring observations on patient groups, and appraises the nature and strength of inferences drawn from those observations. It also demonstrates how the results of this type of research, clinical epidemiologic research, can be incorporated into the decision-making process utilized in clinical medicine. The book contains a concise account of topics such as the assessment of the use of diagnostics and screening tests and their role in improving the outcome of illness, the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy through experimental and nonexperimental studies, and a particularly useful chapter on assessment of therapeutic safety. It is an essential reference and guide to the quantitative assessment of the consequences of illness for clinicians in training or in practice. This new edition features a greatly expanded chapter on randomized control trials, and includes a new chapter on meta-analysis, authored by Peter Cummings. Meta-analysis, the statistical synthesis of data from comparable studies, was unheard of 30 years ago, but with the advent of increased computer technology, the method has been steadily growing in importance in the epidemiology community.

  • The Dream Endures: California Enters the 1940s

    The fifth volume in Starr's classic history of California, The Dream Endures shows how Californians rebounded from the Great Depression to emerge in the 1930s into what is now known as "the good life." Starr illustrates the ways the good life prospered in California--in film, fiction, leisure, and architecture. Starr looks at the newly important places where Californians lived out this sunny lifestyle: areas like Los Angeles (where Hollywood lived), Palm Springs (where Hollywood vacationed), San Diego (where the Navy went), the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena (where Einstein changed his view of the universe), and college towns like Berkeley. "In this, more than any other of Starr's monumental California histories, we see the stirrings of uniqueness in the social and cultural evolution of California. Starr's theme is relevant to all of America and the national destiny."--Neil Morgan, San Diego Union-Tribune "Enormously sensitive and moving. Social and cultural history doesn't get any better."--San Francisco Chronicle "In his monumental continuing study of California, Kevin Starr belongs in the company of the best."--Herbert Gold, Los Angeles Times Book Review

  • Rockne of Notre Dame: The Making of a Football Legend

    In a mere twelve years, Rockne's "Fighting Irish" won 105 games, including five astonishing undefeated seasons. But Rockne was more than the sum of his victories--he was an icon who, more than anyone, made football an American obsession. The book gives us colorful descriptions of such Rockne teams as the undefeated 1924 eleven led by the illustrious Four Horsemen, and the 1930 squad, Rockne's last and greatest. A renowned motivator whose "Win one for the Gipper" is the most famous locker-room speech ever, Rockne was also football's most brilliant innovator, a pioneer of the forward pass, a master of the psychological ploy, and an early advocate of conditioning. In this balanced account, Rockne emerges as an exemplary and complex figure: a fierce competitor who was generous in victory and defeat; an inspiring father figure to his players; and a man so revered nationwide that when he died in a plane crash in 1931, at the height of his career, he was mourned by the entire country. "A solid portrait of one of football's most solid figures."--The New York Times Book Review

  • The Strengths Model: Case Management with People with Psychiatric Disabilities

    Much has occurred since the publication of the first edition of this classic textbook. Recovery from psychiatric disabilities has become the new vision for mental health services. It has placed a new eminence on consumer resiliency, self-determination, shared decision-making, and empowerment. The implementation of evidence-based services has become a major focus of service system reform internationally. The Strenghts Model, Second Edition firmly grounds the strengths model of case management within the recovery paradigm and offers evidence-based guidelines for practice. In clear language the authors describe the conceptual underpinnings, theory, empirical support, principles and practice methods that comprise the strengths model of case management. A chapter on the organisational structure and management methods necessary for successful implementation of the model make this a valuable tool for trainers, supervisors and quality assurance personnel. This edition reflects the dynamic nature of the strengths model. Practice methods have been added and refined, and more detailed descriptions provided. Practice tools have been improved and new ones, like the Strengths Model Fidelity Instrument, added. New case vignettes have been added to give the reader a vivd picture of the methods in actual practice.

  • Constitutional Interpretation: The Basic Questions

    Ronald Dworkin famously argued that fidelity in interpreting the Constitution as written calls for a fusion of constitutional law and moral philosophy. Barber and Fleming take up that call, arguing for a philosophic approach to constitutional interpretation. In doing so, they systematically critique the competing approaches - textualism, consensualism, originalism, structuralism, doctrinalism, minimalism, and pragmatism - that aim and claim to avoid a philosophic approach. Constitutional Interpretation: The Basic Questions illustrates that these approaches cannot avoid philosophic reflection and choice in interpreting the Constitution. Barber and Fleming contend that fidelity in constitutional interpretation requires a fusion of philosophic and other approaches, properly understood. Within such a fusion, interpreters would begin to think of text, consensus, intentions, structures, and doctrines not as alternatives to, but as sites of philosophic reflection about the best understanding of our constitutional commitments. Constitutional Interpretation: The Basic Questions examines the fundamental inquiries that arise in interpreting constitutional law. In doing so, the authors survey the controversial and intriguing questions that have stirred constitutional debate in the United States for over two centuries, such as: how and for what ends should governmental institutions and powers be arranged; what does the Constitution mean under general circumstances and how should it be interpreted during concrete controversies; and finally how do we decide what our constitution means and who ultimately decides its meaning.

  • Natives and Newcomers: The Cultural Origins of North America

    In the past thirty years, historians have come to realize that the shape and temper of early America were determined as much by its Indian natives as by its European colonizers. No one has done more to discover and tell this new story than James Axtell, one of our premiere ethnohistorians. In Natives and Newcomers, a selection of his best essays, Axtell describes in accessible and often witty prose the major encounters between Indians and Europeans -- first contacts, communications, epidemics, trade and gift-giving, social and sexual mingling, work, conversions, military clashes -- and probes their short- and long-term consequences for both cultures. Every essay is based on original research in a wide variety of primary sources, including maps, museum artifacts, archaeological sites, pictures (many of which are reproduced), traders' account books, and oral traditions. The end result is a book which shows how encounters between Indians and Europeans ultimately shaped a distinctly American identity.

  • Nonequilibrium Statistical Mechanics

    This book presents the main principles and methods of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, a topic studied by both chemists and physicists. It is written for graduate students and scientists who already have knowledge of basic equilibrium statistical mechanics and who are interested in the more complex field of time-dependent nonequilibrium statistical mechanics.

  • The Allure of Toxic Leaders: Why We Follow Destructive Bosses and Corrupt Politicians--and How We Can Survive Them

    Toxic leaders, both political, like Slobodan Milosevic, and corporate, like Enron's Ken Lay, have always been with us, and many books have been written to explain what makes them tick. Here leadership scholar Jean Lipman-Blumen explains what makes the followers tick, exploring why people will tolerate--and remain loyal to--leaders who are destructive to their organizations, their employees, or their nations. Why do we knowingly follow, seldom unseat, frequently prefer, and sometimes even create toxic leaders? Lipman-Blumen argues that these leaders appeal to our deepest needs, playing on our anxieties and fears, on our yearnings for security, high self-esteem, and significance, and on our desire for noble enterprises and immortality. She also explores how followers inadvertently keep themselves in line by a set of insidious control myths that they internalize. For example, the belief that the leader must necessarily be in a position to "know more" than the followers often stills their objections. In addition, outside forces--such as economic depressions, political upheavals, or a crisis in a company--can increase our anxiety and our longing for charismatic leaders. Lipman-Blumen shows how followers can learn critical lessons for the future and survive in the meantime. She discusses how to confront, reform, undermine, blow the whistle on, or oust a toxic leader. And she suggests how we can diminish our need for strong leaders, identify "reluctant leaders" among competent followers, and even nurture the leader within ourselves. Toxic leaders charm, manipulate, mistreat, weaken, and ultimately devastate their followers. The Allure of Toxic Leaders tells us how to recognize these leaders before it's too late.

  • Louis Armstrong, In His Own Words: Selected Writings

    Louis Armstrong has been the subject of countless biographies and music histories. Yet scant attention has been paid to the remarkable array of writings he left behind. Louis Armstrong: In His Own Words introduces readers to a little-known facet of this master trumpeter, band leader, and entertainer. Based on extensive research through the Armstrong archives, this important volume includes some of his earliest letters, personal correspondence with one of his first biographers in 1943-44, autobiographical writings, magazine articles, and essays. Here are Armstrong's own thoughts on his life and career--from poverty in New Orleans to playing in the famous cafes, cabarets, and saloons of Storyville, from his big break in 1922 with the King Oliver band to his storming of New York, from his breaking of color barriers in Hollywood to the infamous King of the Zulus incident in 1949, and finally, to his last days in Queens, New York. Along the way Armstrong recorded touching portraits of his times and offered candid, often controversial, opinions about racism, marijuana, bebop, and other jazz artists such as Jelly Roll Morton and Coleman Hawkins. Indeed, these writings provide a balanced portrait of his life as a musician, entertainer, civil rights activist, and cultural icon. Armstrong's idiosyncratic use of language and punctuation have been preserved to give the reader an unvarnished portrayal of this compelling artist. This volume also includes introductions to the writings, as well as an annotated index of names and places significant to Armstrong's life.

  • Decision Making and Rationality in the Modern World

    In Decision Making and Rationality in the Modern World, Keith E. Stanovich demonstrates how work in the cognitive psychology of decision making has implications for the large and theoretically contentious debates about the nature of human rationality. Written specifically for undergraduate psychology students, the book presents a very practical approach to decision making, which is too often perceived by students as an artificial set of skills used only in academia and not in the real world. Instead, Stanovich shows how good decision-making procedures support rational behavior that enables people to act most efficiently to fulfill their goals. He explains how the concept of rationality is understood in cognitive science in terms of good decision making and judgment. Books in the Fundamentals of Cognition series serve as ideal instructional resources for advanced courses in cognitive psychology. They provide an up-to-date, well-organized survey of our current understanding of the major theories of cognitive psychology. The books are concise, which allows instructors to incorporate the latest original research and readings into their courses without overburdening their students. Focused without being too advanced--and comprehensive without being too broad--these books are the perfect resource for both students and instructors.

  • Compulsive Hoarding and Acquiring: Therapist Guide

    The problem of compulsive hoarding and acquiring is more widespread than commonly believed. It often goes undiagnosed, either because sufferers are ashamed of their compulsions or because they don't believe it is a problem that merits professional attention. However, compulsive hoarding can be an emotionally exhausting, uncontrollable, and sometimes dangerous problem. Written by the developers of this groundbreaking treatment, this Therapist Guide is the first to present an empirically supported and effective CBT program for treating compulsive hoarding and acquiring. It gives clinicians the information to understand hoarding and proven tools to help clients overcome their compulsive behaviours. It teaches individuals how to recognise errors in thinking and uses both imagined and real exposures to teach them the skills they need to manage their problem. Home visits by the clinician are a part of the treatment, as well as consultations with other professionals who might assist if necessary. Homework exercises include behavioual experiments to test personal beliefs about possessions, developing an organisation plan and filing system, and sorting and organising items room-by-room. Designed to be used in conjunction with the corresponding Workbook, the Therapist Guide provides numerous assessment and intervention forms to help clients use the methods described in this program. Complete with case examples and strategies for dealing with problems, this user-friendly guide is a dependable resource that no clinician can do without.

  • The Lives and Times of the Great Composers

    A grand and panoramic biograhical history of the giants of classical music, The Lives and Times of Great Composers is a new, unique, and lovingly constructed modern reference--and a beguiling read which you will return to again and again.

    Interlinked yet self-contained, each chapter distills the life of one or more composers, set against the social, political, musical, and cultural background of the time. Read the story of Bach, the respectable burgher, much of whose vast output was composed amidst petty turf disputes in Luteran Leipzig; or the ugly, argumentative Beethoven, obsessed by his laundry; or Mozart, the over-exploited infant prodigy whose untimely death was shrouded in rumor; or the ghastly death of Donizetti and Smetana. Read about Verdi, who composed against the background of the Italian Risorgimento, or about the family life of the Wagners; and Brahms, who rose from the slums of Hamburg to become a devotee of beer and coffee in fin-de-siecle Vienna, a cultural capital bent on destroying Mahler.

    Michael Steen paints a vivid portrait of the tumultuous times in which these brilliant, yet flawed, human beings labored--a tour of 350 years of European history. From Handel's London and the speculative financial frenzy of the "South Sea bubble"; to the courts of petty German princelings and the ornate and sleazy Dresden; to the astonishingly creative Vienna of Beethoven and Schubert; to the opera in 19th-century Paris and Bizet in the Franco-Prussian War and the Commune; to the Majorca of Chopin, to the Russia of Tchaikovsky and the Siege of Leningrad, just one of the many horrors which Shostakovich had to survive. We encounter, too, painters such as Renoir and Manet, literary figures like Zola, Proust, and Dostoyevsky, and religious leaders such as Pope Pius IX and Cardinal Newman. Great Composers paints in broad brushstrokes the culture of a continent far wider than music.

  • Cognition, Evolution, and Behavior

    How do animals perceive the world, learn, remember, search for food or mates, communicate, and find their way around? Do any nonhuman animals count, imitate one another, use a language, or have a culture? What are the uses of cognition in nature and how might it have evolved? What is the current status of Darwin's claim that other species share the same "mental powers" as humans, but to different degrees? In this completely revised second edition of Cognition, Evolution, and Behavior, Sara Shettleworth addresses these questions, among others, by integrating findings from psychology, behavioral ecology, and ethology in a unique and wide-ranging synthesis of theory and research on animal cognition, in the broadest sense-from species-specific adaptations of vision in fish and associative learning in rats to discussions of theory of mind in chimpanzees, dogs, and ravens. She reviews the latest research on topics such as episodic memory, metacognition, and cooperation and other-regarding behavior in animals, as well as recent theories about what makes human cognition unique. In every part of this new edition, Shettleworth incorporates findings and theoretical approaches that have emerged since the first edition was published in 1998. The chapters are now organized into three sections: Fundamental Mechanisms (perception, learning, categorization, memory), Physical Cognition (space, time, number, physical causation), and Social Cognition (social knowledge, social learning, communication). Shettleworth has also added new chapters on evolution and the brain and on numerical cognition, and a new chapter on physical causation that integrates theories of instrumental behavior with discussions of foraging, planning, and tool using.

  • Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800

    It was a contest of titans: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, two heroes of the Revolutionary era, once intimate friends, now icy antagonists locked in a fierce battle for the future of the United States. The election of 1800 was a thunderous clash of a campaign that climaxed in a deadlock in the Electoral College and led to a crisis in which the young republic teetered on the edge of collapse. Adams vs. Jefferson is a gripping account of a true turning point in American history, a dramatic struggle between two parties with profoundly different visions of how the nation should be governed. Adams led the Federalists, conservatives who favored a strong central government, and Jefferson led the Republicans, egalitarians who felt the Federalists had betrayed the Revolution of 1776 and were backsliding toward monarchy. The campaign itself was a barroom brawl every bit as ruthless as any modern contest, with mud-slinging--Federalists called Jefferson "a howling atheist"--scare tactics, and backstabbing. The low point came when Alexander Hamilton printed a devastating attack on Adams, the head of his own party, in "fifty-four pages of unremitting vilification." The election ended in a stalemate in the Electoral College that dragged on for days and nights and through dozens of ballots. Tensions ran so high that the Republicans threatened civil war if the Federalists denied Jefferson the presidency. Finally a secret deal that changed a single vote gave Jefferson the White House. A devastated Adams left Washington before dawn on Inauguration Day, too embittered even to shake his rival's hand. Jefferson's election, John Ferling concludes, consummated the American Revolution, assuring the democratization of the United States and its true separation from Britain. With magisterial command, Ferling brings to life both the outsize personalities and the hotly contested political questions at stake. He shows not just why this moment was a milestone in U.S. history, but how strongly the issues--and the passions--of 1800 resonate with our own time.

  • American Popular Music: The Rock Years

    Rock, country, pop, soul, funk, punk, folk, hip-hop, techno, grunge--it's all here. In American Popular Music: The Rock Years, Larry Starr and Christopher Waterman take readers on a fascinating journey through the rich historical and stylistic landscape of American rock. An abridged version of the authors' acclaimed American Popular Music: From Minstrelsy to MTV, this volume includes chapters 8-14 of the longer book along with new introductory and concluding chapters. American Popular Music: The Rock Years traces the development of rock from its roots in the mid-1940s to its current state in the twenty-first century, integrating in-depth discussions of the music itself with solid coverage of the attendant historical, social, and cultural circumstances. It strikes a balance between musical analysis and social context, showing how rock and American culture have continuously influenced each other over time. Using well-chosen examples, insightful commentaries, and an engaging writing style, the authors highlight the contributions of diverse groups to the development of rock music, explain the effects of advancements in recording technology, and chronicle the growth of rock music as an industry. The book is enhanced by a rich illustration program; boxed inserts on significant individuals, recordings, and intriguing topics; and well-organized listening charts for recordings that are discussed in detail in the text. Remarkably accessible, American Popular Music: The Rock Years is ideal for introductory courses in the history of rock and roll and will encourage readers to become more critically aware listeners of rock music.

  • Fat Politics: The Real Story behind America's Obesity Epidemic

    Over the past twenty years, obesity has risen in the United States to epidemic proportions. Today, over sixty percent of Americans are overweight, and over one in four is obese. This book examines the cultural contradictions that underlie this massive transformation. Oliver's highly readable yet carefully documented book addresses the meaning of obesity in American life. At one level, the book outlines very straightforward issues such as controversies over the sources of obesity, its economic and social consequences, and its prospects for resolution. At another level, the book examines fatism, the last bastion of acceptable discrimination in the United States, particularly as it applies to women. Finally, the book makes a deeper argument about how obesity reflects a serious contradiction in American life. At no other time in human history has food been so easily available and survival so physically un-taxing. But rather than giving us greater freedom, our affluence has disempowered us. Most Americans continue to gain weight and fight a losing struggle to reduce their body sizes, and increasingly, the overweight are derided for their moral failure. As more people become obese, this cultural paradox will grow. In the book's conclusion, Oliver outlines how the contradiction surrounding America's obesity epidemic may be resolved and where the battle lines in the coming fat wars are likely to be drawn.

  • English Standard Version Bible with Apocrypha

    The English Standard Version Bible captures as far as possible the precise wording of the original biblical text and the personal style of each Bible writer, while taking into account differences of grammar, syntax, and idiom between current literary English and the original languages. The ESV thus provides an accurate rendering of the original texts that is in readable, high quality English prose and poetry. This Bible has been growing in popularity among students in biblical studies, mainline Christian scholars and clergy, and Evangelical Christians of all denominations. Along with that growth comes the need for the books of the Apocrypha to be included in ESV Bibles, both for denominations that use those books in liturgical readings and for students who need them for historical purposes. More Evangelicals are also beginning to be interested in the Apocrypha, even though they don't consider it God's Word. The English Standard Version Bible with the Apocrypha, for which the Apocrypha has been commissioned by Oxford University Press, employs the same methods and guidelines used by the original translators of the ESV, to produce for the first time an ESV Apocrypha. This will be the only ESV with Apocrypha available anywhere, and it includes all of the books and parts of books in the Protestant Apocrypha, the Catholic Old Testament, and the Old Testament as used in Orthodox Christian churches. It will have a lovely pre-printed case binding, and will include a full-color map section, a table of weights and measures used in the Bible, and many other attractive features. The English Standard Version Bible with Apocrypha is certain to become the preferred Bible in more conservative divinity schools and seminaries, where the Apocrypha is studied from an academic perspective. And it answers the need of conservative Christians in general for a more literal version of these books.

  • Fabrication Engineering at the Micro and Nanoscale

    Designed for advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate courses in semiconductor or microelectronic fabrication, the third edition of Fabrication Engineering at the Micro and Nanoscale provides a thorough and accessible introduction to all fields of micro and nano fabrication. Completely revised and updated, the text covers the entire basic unit processes used to fabricate integrated circuits and other devices. It includes more worked examples, illustrations, and expands coverage of the frontiers of fabrication processes. The physics and chemistry of each process are introduced along with descriptions of the equipment used to carry out the processes. The text uses a popular commercial process simulation suite--the Silvaco Athena(R) set of codes--to provide meaningful examples of many of the basic processes including diffusion, oxidation, lithography, and deposition. The book goes on to discuss the integration of these basic unit processes into various technologies, concentrating on CMOS transistors. The text breaks down the material into treatments on the concepts of process modules, thermal budget, advanced architectures, and the use of channel strain for improved performance.

  • The Oxford Book of American Poetry

    Here is the eagerly awaited new edition of The Oxford Book of American Poetry brought completely up to date and dramatically expanded by poet David Lehman. It is a rich, capacious volume, featuring the work of more than 200 poets-almost three times as many as the 1976 edition. With a succinct and often witty head note introducing each author, it is certain to become the definitive anthology of American poetry for our time.

    Lehman has gathered together all the works one would expect to find in a landmark collection of American poetry, from Whitman's Crossing Brooklyn Ferry to Stevens's The Idea of Order at Key West, and from Eliot's The Waste Land to Ashbery's Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror. But equally important, the editor has significantly expanded the range of the anthology. The book includes not only writers born since the previous edition, but also many fine poets overlooked in earlier editions or little known in the past but highly deserving of attention. The anthology confers legitimacy on the Objectivist poets; the so-called Proletariat poets of the 1930s; famous poets who fell into neglect or were the victims of critical backlash (Edna St. Vincent Millay); poets whose true worth has only become clear with the passing of time (Weldon Kees). Among poets missing from Richard Ellmann's 1976 volume but published here are W. H. Auden, Charles Bukowski, Donald Justice, Carolyn Kizer, Kenneth Koch, Stanley Kunitz, Emma Lazarus, Mina Loy, Howard Moss, Lorine Niedecker, George Oppen, James Schuyler, Elinor Wylie, and Louis Zukosky. Many more women are represented: outstanding poets such as Josephine Jacobsen, Josephine Miles, May Swenson. Numerous African-American poets receive their due, and unexpected figures such as the musicians Bob Dylan, Patti Smith and Robert Johnson have a place in this important work.

    This stunning collection redefines the great canon of American poetry from its origins in the 17th century right up to the present. It is a must-have anthology for anyone interested in American literature and a book that is sure to be consulted, debated, and treasured for years to come.

  • North American Indians: A Very Short Introduction

    When Europeans first arrived in North America, between five and eight million indigenous people were already living there. But how did they come to be here? What were their agricultural, spiritual, and hunting practices? How did their societies evolve and what challenges do they face today? Eminent historians Theda Perdue and Michael Green begin by describing how nomadic bands of hunter-gatherers followed the bison and woolly mammoth over the Bering land mass between Asia and what is now Alaska between 25,000 and 15,000 years ago, settling throughout North America. They describe hunting practices among different tribes, how some made the gradual transition to more settled, agricultural ways of life, the role of kinship and cooperation in Native societies, their varied burial rites and spiritual practices, and many other features of Native American life. Throughout the book, Perdue and Green stress the great diversity of indigenous peoples in America, who spoke more than 400 different languages before the arrival of Europeans and whose ways of life varied according to the environments they settled in and adapted to so successfully. Most importantly, the authors stress how Native Americans have struggled to maintain their sovereignty--first with European powers and then with the United States--in order to retain their lands, govern themselves, support their people, and pursue practices that have made their lives meaningful. Going beyond the stereotypes that so often distort our views of Native Americans, this Very Short Introduction offers an historically accurate, deeply engaging, and often inspiring account of the wide array of Native peoples in America. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

  • Epilepsy in Our View: Stories from Friends and Family of People Living with Epilepsy

    Epilepsy in our View is a collection of personal stories from friends, family members, and co-workers of people with epilepsy, in which they describe their observations and feelings about witnessing seizures and about the person with epilepsy. It helps to shed light on the social consequences of epilepsy while increasing understanding of what's happening when a person has a seizure. ABOUT THE SERIES: With the Brainstorms series, one of the world's leading authorities on epilepsy, Dr Steven C. Schachter, has gathered together the personal testimonies of patients, family members, and caregivers to create a poignant and gripping series of books on this misunderstood and often devastating disorder.

  • The Western Esoteric Traditions: A Historical Introduction

    Western esotericism has now emerged as an academic study in its own right, combining spirituality with an empirical observation of the natural world while also relating the humanity to the universe through a harmonious celestial order. This introduction to the Western esoteric traditions offers a concise overview of their historical development. Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke explores these traditions, from their roots in Hermeticism, Neo-Platonism, and Gnosticism in the early Christian era up to their reverberations in today's scientific paradigms. While the study of Western esotericism is usually confined to the history of ideas, Goodrick-Clarke examines the phenomenon much more broadly. He demonstrates that, far from being a strictly intellectual movement, the spread of esotericism owes a great deal to geopolitics and globalization. In Hellenistic culture, for example, the empire of Alexander the Great, which stretched across Egypt and Western Asia to provinces in India, facilitated a mixing of Eastern and Western cultures. As the Greeks absorbed ideas from Egypt, Babylon, Assyria, and Persia, they gave rise to the first esoteric movements. From the late sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries, post-Reformation spirituality found expression in theosophy, Rosicrucianism and Freemasonry. Similarly, in the modern era, dissatisfaction with the hegemony of science in Western culture and a lack of faith in traditional Christianity led thinkers like Madame Blavatsky to look East for spiritual inspiration. Goodrick-Clarke further examines Modern esoteric thought the light of new scientific and medical paradigms along with the analytical psychology of Carl Gustav Jung. This book traces the complete history of these movements and is the definitive account of Western esotericism.

  • The Ghost of Freedom: A History of the Caucasus

    The Caucasus mountains rise at the intersection of Europe, Russia, and the Middle East. A land of astonishing natural beauty and a dizzying array of ancient cultures, the Caucasus has often been the object of imperial ambition. South of the mountains, Persia and Ottoman Turkey vied for control of the lowland shepherds abd upland khans who inhabited the zone; to the north, the Russian empire wasged a war for mastery of the higlnads that lasted th better part of the nineteenth century. For most of the twentieth century, the entire Caucasus lay inside the Soviet Union, before movements of national liberation created newly independent countries and sparked the devastating war in Chechnya. The Ghost of Freedom is the first general history of the modern Caucasus, from the beginning of Russian imperial exapnsion up to rise of new countries after the Societ Union's collapse. Combining riveting storytelling with insightful essay-writing, the book provides an indispensible guide to the complicated histories, politics, and cultures of this intriguing frontier. Based on new research in multiple languages, it shows how the struggle for freedom in the mountains, hills, and plains of the Caucasus has been a perennial theme over the last two hundred years - a struggle which has led to liberation as well as to new forms of captivity. In evocative and accessible prose, Charles King reveals how tsars, highlanders, revolutionaries, and adventures have contributed to the fascinating history of this borderland. Ranging from the salons of Russian writers to the circus sideshows of America, from the offices of European diplomats to the village of Muslim mountaineers, The Ghost of Freedom paints a rich portrait of one the world's most volatile and least understood regions.

  • Caring for Patients at the End of Life: Facing an Uncertain Future Together

    This book uses easily accessible clinical stories about severely ill patients and their families to illustrate and explore the challenge and potential of end-of-life care, including: 1) the values that underlie medical humanism, 2) communication issues for clinicians, patients and families, and 3) challenging clinical and ethical issues.

  • The Art of Teaching Science: Inquiry and Innovation in Middle School and High School

    The Art of Teaching Science focuses on the preparation of science teachers as professional artists. This text emphasizes a humanistic, experiential, and constructivist approach to teaching and learning, integrating a wide variety of pedagogical learning tools. These tools involve inquiry, experimentation, reflection, writing, discussion, and interaction. Becoming a science teacher is a creative process, and this innovative textbook encourages students to construct ideas about science teaching through their interactions with peers, professionals, and instructors, and through hands-on, minds-on activities designed to foster a collaborative, thoughtful learning environment. The Art of Teaching Science is a science-teaching handbook designed for the professional development of middle- and high-school science teachers. The experiential tools in the book make it useful for both pre- and in-service teacher education environments, easily adapted to any classroom setting. Profound changes in our understanding of the goals of science teaching-as evidenced by the emphasis on inquiry-based activities advocated by the National Science Education Standards-underscore the need to equip a new cadre of educators with the proper tools to encourage innovation and science literacy in the classroom. Providing meaningful learning experiences and connections with the most recent research and understanding of science teaching, The Art of Teaching Science sets the standard for the future of science education.

  • The Complete Musician Student Workbook: An Integrated Approach to Tonal Theory, Analysis, and Listening: Volume I

    This Student Workbook accompanies The Complete Musician: An Integrated Approach to Tonal Theory, Analysis, and Listening, Second Edition. The first of two volumes, it provides 144 separate assignments that accompany chapters 1-23 of the textbook. The second edition features a new layout: exercises are now structured in a consistent format of discrete assignments (four to eight assignments per chapter) that usually fit on one or two sheets of paper for ease in handing in to the instructor. Each assignment contains a variety of exercises, crafted for students with a wide range of abilities. Supplementary exercises are also included for further practice. The Complete Musician, Second Edition, is enhanced and supplemented by five music DVDs--two packaged with the text, two with this Student Workbook, and one with Student Workbook II. These DVDs contain a total of more than sixteen hours of high-quality recorded examples--from solo piano to full orchestra--of the examples and exercises in the text and workbooks, performed by soloists and ensembles from the Eastman School of Music and the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. In addition, examples and exercises are included on the DVDs in downloadable MP3 format.

  • Inborn Errors of Development: The molecular basis of clinical disorders of morphogenesis

    Inborn Errors of Development is the definitive work on genetically caused abnormalities of human development. Despite the explosion in genetic advances, the causes of two-thirds of all birth defects remain unknown. However, we are on the brink of a revolution in this area, and this book is at the forefront. It is the first book to connect the disease-causing gene to its biochemical pathway and to the structural/functional disorder. Mutations of the gene, the clinical picture, genetic counselling and prognosis, and any known treatments are discussed.

  • Body & Soul: Notebooks of an Apprentice Boxer

    When French sociologist Loic Wacquant signed up at a boxing gym in a black neighborhood of Chicago's South Side, he had never contemplated getting close to a ring, let alone climbing into it. Yet for three years he immersed himself among local fighters, amateur and professional. He learned the Sweet science of bruising, participating in all phases of the pugilist's strenuous preparation, from shadow-boxing drills to sparring to fighting in the Golden Gloves tournament. In this experimental ethnography of incandescent intensity, the scholar-turned-boxer dissects the making of prizefighters and supplies a model for a "carnal sociology" capable of capturing "the taste and ache of action." Body & Soul marries the analytic rigor of the sociologist with the stylistic grace of the novelist to offer a compelling portrait of a bodily craft and of life and labor in the black American ghetto at century's end, but also a revealing tale of self transformation and social transcendence. And, by fleshing out Pierre Bourdieu's signal concept of habitus, it deepens our theoretical grasp of human practice.

  • The Artful Mind: Cognitive Science and the Riddle of Human Creativity

    All normal human beings alive in the last fifty thousand years appear to have possessed, in Mark Turner's phrase, "irrepressibly artful minds." Cognitively modern minds produced a staggering list of behavioral singularities--science, religion, mathematics, language, advanced tool use, decorative dress, dance, culture, art--that seems to indicate a mysterious and unexplained discontinuity between us and all other living things. This brute fact gives rise to some tantalizing questions: How did the artful mind emerge? What are the basic mental operations that make art possible for us now, and how do they operate? These are the questions that occupy the distinguished contributors to this volume, which emerged from a year-long Getty-funded research project hosted by the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. These scholars bring to bear a range of disciplinary and cross-disciplinary perspectives on the relationship between art (broadly conceived), the mind, and the brain. Together they hope to provide directions for a new field of research that can play a significant role in answering the great riddle of human singularity.

  • Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State

    Through a sweeping analytical narrative, from the Great Depression of the 1930s to the Great Recession of today, Caring for America shows how law and social policy shaped home care into a low-wage job, stigmatized as part of public welfare, primarily funded through Medicaid, and relegated to the bottom of the medical hierarchy. Care work became a job for African American and immigrant women that kept them in poverty, while providing independence from institutionalization for needy elderly and disabled people. But while the state organized home care, it did not do so without eliciting contestation and confrontation from the citizens themselves who gave and received it. Authors Eileen Boris and Jennifer Klein trace the intertwined, sometimes conflicting search of care providers and receivers for dignity, self-determination, security, and personal and social worth. This book highlights social movements of senior citizens for disability rights and independent living, the civil rights organizing of women on welfare and domestic workers, the battles of public sector unions, and the unionization of health and service workers. It rethinks the history of the American welfare state from the perspective of care work, all the while re-examining the strategies of the U.S. labor movement in terms of a growing care work economy. An unprecedented study, Caring for America serves as a definitive historical account of how public policy has impacted major modern movements and trends in class, race, and gender politics in the United States.

  • Study Guide to Accompany Many Worlds of Logic, 2/e

    In this accompanying study guide to The Many Worlds of Logic, 2/e, author Paul Herrick opens each chapter with a summary of its content and the skills that students will learn or master at its end. To avoid repetition, the Selected Answers section from the back of the main text--consisting of approximately one-third of the book's problems--is not presented in this study guide. Instead, students have access to the answers to most of the remaining problems. The author has purposely left some questions unanswered in both the textbook and this study guide so that they can be assigned as homework assignments.

  • Dilemmas in Economic Theory: Persisting Foundational Problems of Microeconomics

    By examining the development of economics in the 20th century, this book argues that the breakthroughs of post-World War II general equilibrium theory and its rejection of utilitarianism and marginal productivity have been misunderstood. Mandler maintains that although earlier neoclassicism deserved criticism, current theory does not adequately address the problems the discarded concepts were designed to solve, and that intractable dilemmas therefore appear.

  • Robert Bresson: A Passion for Film

    The films of the late French filmmaker Robert Bresson, once thought formidable both because of the somberness of their subject matter and the austerity of the filmmaker's style, have in the last decade found a new audience. In part, this is owing to the rarely acknowledged but profound influence his style has had on later filmmakers-from Chantal Akerman to Michael Haeneke. This book looks at Bresson's body of work not only by coming to terms with its thematic preoccupations and the development of its unique authorial style, but also in terms of the ouvre's seminal place in the history of film. The filmic rhetoric that Bresson pursued was nothing less than an effort to create an exemplary form of film narrative, throwing off the conventions of the theater and acting that still dominate mainstream filmmaking. In this respect, Bresson's films are no less ground-breaking than those of D.W. Griffith and Sergei Eisenstein. In addition, while few who have written about Bresson would deny the highly personal and idiosyncratic nature of his work, its autobiographical dimension has never been fully explored. This constitutes a rich vein for investigation and the films-in both their subject matter and style-mirror and trace the aesthetic and psychological dispositions of the filmmaker. What one discovers in these explorations is a deeper relationship between the filmmaker and his literary models-especially the novelists Georges Bernanos and Fyodor Dostoevsky. With both, he also shares convictions about the "fallen?nature of humanity, an attitude of mourning for the loss of childhood innocence, a strong preoccupation with Christian theology, and the role evil and sexuality play in our lives. In this book Bresson's sources, style, and biography are explored via a chronological investigation of his films, yielding a dense analysis worthy of this master filmmaker.

  • The Illustrated Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era

    Winner of the 1988 Pulitzer Prize for History and a New York Times Bestseller, Battle Cry of Freedom is universally recognized as the definitive account of the Civil War. It was hailed in The New York Times as "historical writing of the highest order." The Washington Post called it "the finest single volume on the war and its background." And The Los Angeles Times wrote that "of the 50,000 books written on the Civil War, it is the finest compression of that national paroxysm ever fitted between two covers."
    Now available in a splendid new edition is The Illustrated Battle Cry of Freedom. Boasting some seven hundred pictures, including a hundred and fifty color images and twenty-four full-color maps, here is the ultimate gift book for everyone interested in American history. McPherson has selected all the illustrations, including rare contemporary photographs, period cartoons, etchings, woodcuts, and paintings, carefully choosing those that best illuminate the narrative. More important, he has written extensive captions (some 35,000 words in all, virtually a book in themselves), many of which offer genuinely new information and interpretations that significantly enhance the text. The text itself, streamlined by McPherson, remains a fast-paced narrative that brilliantly captures two decades of contentious American history, from the Mexican War to Lee's surrender at Appomattox. The reader will find a truly masterful chronicle of the war itself--the battles, the strategic maneuvering on both sides, the politics, and the personalities--as well as McPherson's thoughtful commentary on such matters as the slavery expansion issue in the 1850s, the origins of the Republican Party, the causes of secession, internal dissent and anti-war opposition in the North and the South, and the reasons for the Union's victory.
    A must-have purchase for the legions of Civil War buffs, The Illustrated Battle Cry of Freedom is both a spectacularly beautiful volume and the definitive account of the most important conflict in our nation's history.

  • Music in West Africa: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture

    This book introduces the musical traditions of West Africa and discusses the diversity, motifs, and structure of West African music within the larger patterns of the region's culture. Drawing upon the author's extensive fieldwork, it explores how the music's complex rhythmic combinations in fast-paced patterns and quick, tightly orchestrated movements influence how West Africans understand themselves and their culture.

  • Mulliken and Young's Vascular Anomalies: Hemangiomas and Malformations

    The field of vascular anomalies has grown rapidly in last 25 years. Molecular genetics has led to discovery of genes that cause vascular anomalies. Interventional radiology has become a major contributor to accurate diagnosis and management of previously untreatable disorders. New pharmacologic therapies are under investigation and surgical protocols have been established. Vascular Anomalies: Hemangiomas and Malformations is a comprehensive and interdisciplinary textbook ideal for dermatologists, interventional radiologists, surgical specialists, ophthalmologists, pathologists, geneticists, paediatricians, hematologic-oncologists, and vascular biologists. With a central motif of the biologic dichotomy of vascular tumors and vascular malformations, this book is organized into chapters which address clinical presentation, diagnostic imaging, molecular genetics, pathogenesis, histopathology, and management of vascular anomalies. Generous, full-colour images compliment this extensive volume written by three colleagues and their teammates from Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, with leading specialists from other centers.

  • Viruses, Plagues, and History: Past, Present and Future

    The story of viruses and humanity is a story of fear and ignorance, of grief and heartbreak, and of great bravery and sacrifice. Michael Oldstone tells all these stories as he illuminates the history of the devastating diseases that have tormented humanity, focusing mostly on the most famous viruses. Oldstone begins with smallpox, polio, and measles. Nearly 300 million people were killed by smallpox in this century alone and the author presents a vivid account of the long campaign to eradicate this lethal killer. Oldstone then describes the fascinating viruses that have captured headlines in more recent years: Ebola, Hantavirus, mad cow disease (a frightening illness made worse by government mishandling and secrecy), and, of course, AIDS. And he tells us of the many scientists watching and waiting even now for the next great plague, monitoring influenza strains to see whether the deadly variant from 1918--a viral strain that killed over 20 million people in 1918-1919--will make a comeback. For this revised edition, Oldstone includes discussions of new viruses like SARS, bird flu, virally caused cancers, chronic wasting disease, and West Nile, and fully updates the original text with new findings on particular viruses. Viruses, Plagues, and History paints a sweeping portrait of humanity's long-standing conflict with our unseen viral enemies. Oldstone's book is a vivid history of a fascinating field, and a highly reliable dispatch from an eminent researcher on the front line of this ongoing campaign.

  • Green Phoenix: Restoring the Tropical Forests of Guanacaste, Costa Rica

    Can we prevent the destruction of the world's tropical forests? In the fire-scarred hills of Costa Rica, award-winning science writer William Allen found a remarkable answer: we can not only prevent their destruction--we can bring them back to their former glory. In Green Phoenix, Allen tells the gripping story of a large group of Costa Rican and American scientists and volunteers who set out to save the tropical forests in the northwestern section of the country. It was an area badly damaged by the fires of ranchers and small farmers; in many places a few strands of forest strung across a charred landscape. Despite the widely held belief that tropical forests, once lost, are lost forever, the team led by the dynamic Daniel Janzen from the University of Pennsylvania moved relentlessly ahead, taking a broad array of political, ecological, and social steps necessary for restoration. They began with 39 square miles and, by 2000, they had stitched together and revived some 463 square miles of land and another 290 of marine area. Today this region is known as the Guanacaste Conservation Area, a fabulously rich landscape of dry forest, cloud forest, and rain forest that gives life to some 235,000 species of plants and animals. It may be the greatest environmental success of our time, a prime example of how extensive devastation can be halted and reversed. This is an inspiring story, and in recounting it, Allen writes with vivid power. He creates lasting images of pristine beaches and dense forest and captures the heroics and skill of the scientific teams, especially the larger-than-life personality of the maverick ecologist Daniel Janzen. It is a book everyone concerned about the environment will want to own.

  • In Discordance with the Scriptures: American Protestant Battles Over Translating the Bible

    The story of the translation of the Bible in America begins with the King James Version. In fact, many Americans thought of the KJV as the foundational text of the Republic, rather than a cultural inheritance from Anglican Britain. In the nineteenth century, however, as new editions of the Greek New Testament appeared, scholars increasingly recognized significant errors and inconsistencies in the KJV. This soon 1ed to the Bible revision movement, whose goal was the uniting of all English-speaking Protestants behind one new, improved version of the Bible. Ironically, as Peter Thuesen shows in this fascinating history, the revision movement in fact resulted in a vast proliferation of English scripture editions and an enduring polarization of American Christians over versions of Holy Writ. The recurrent controversies over Bible translations, he argues, tell us less about the linguistic issues dividing conservatives and liberals than about the theological assumptions they have long held in common.

  • The Many Worlds of Logic

    With clear explanations and many examples drawn right out of day-to-day life, Paul Herrick untangles the complexities of logical theory in The Many Worlds of Logic. This new edition adds new chapters on informal logic and critical thinking. It also breaks out longer chapters from the previous edition into shorter, more focused chapters. Herrick has added many new explanations and examples; in in each chapter, he covers the fundamentals completely before moving on to more challenging areas. Features * Difficult terms are highlighted and explained carefully * End-of-chapter glossaries help students remember important terms * Hundreds of examples demonstrate the application of concepts * Hundreds of excercises help students learn logic by actually doing it * Truth-trees in an appendix help students go beyond the basics

  • Natural-Born Cyborgs: Minds, Technologies, and the Future of Human Intelligence

    From Robocop to the Terminator to Eve 8, no image better captures our deepest fears about technology than the cyborg, the person who is both flesh and metal, brain and electronics. But philosopher and cognitive scientist Andy Clark sees it differently. Cyborgs, he writes, are not something to be feared-we already are cyborgs. In Natural-Born Cyborgs, Clark argues that what makes humans so different from other species is our capacity to fully incorporate tools and supporting cultural practices into our existence. Technology as simple as writing on a sketchpad, as familiar as Google or a cellular phone, and as potentially revolutionary as mind-extending neural implants-all exploit our brains' astonishingly plastic nature. Our minds are primed to seek out and incorporate non-biological resources, so that we actually think and feel through our best technologies. Drawing on his expertise in cognitive science, Clark demonstrates that our sense of self and of physical presence can be expanded to a remarkable extent, placing the long-existing telephone and the emerging technology of telepresence on the same continuum. He explores ways in which we have adapted our lives to make use of technology (the measurement of time, for example, has wrought enormous changes in human existence), as well as ways in which increasingly fluid technologies can adapt to individual users during normal use. Bio-technological unions, Clark argues, are evolving with a speed never seen before in history. As we enter an age of wearable computers, sensory augmentation, wireless devices, intelligent environments, thought-controlled prosthetics, and rapid-fire information search and retrieval, the line between the user and her tools grows thinner day by day. "This double whammy of plastic brains and increasingly responsive and well-fitted tools creates an unprecedented opportunity for ever-closer kinds of human-machine merger," he writes, arguing that such a merger is entirely natural. A stunning new look at the human brain and the human self, Natural Born Cyborgs reveals how our technology is indeed inseparable from who we are and how we think.

  • World Architecture: A Cross-Cultural History

    Spiro Kostof's groundbreaking work, A History of Architecture: Settings and Rituals, helped to reshape the study of architectural history. His book extended beyond the discussion of great monuments to find connections with ordinary dwellings, urbanism, and different cultures from around the world. World Architecture: A Cross-Cultural History is an entirely new, student-friendly text by Richard Ingersoll. Building on Kostof's global vision and social context, Ingersoll integrates extensive coverage of world and contemporary architecture in order to provide the most comprehensive survey in the field. Presented chronologically, each chapter now focuses on three unique architectural cultures, which gives instructors the flexibility to choose which traditions are the most relevant to their courses. The text also provides students with numerous pedagogical tools, including timelines, comparative maps, a glossary, and text boxes devoted to social factors and specific issues in technology and philosophy. The result is a comprehensive method for understanding and appreciating the history, cultural significance, and beauty of architecture from around the world. FEATURES * Stunning full-color visuals: More than 750 color photographs, hundreds of original graphics, drawings, and maps, and meticulous diagrams demonstrate how classic buildings were created * Helpful learning and study tools: New timelines, chapter introductions, text boxes with fascinating case studies, bibliographies, review questions, and a glossary help students identify key information and better prepare them for exams and class assignments * Free companion website resources (www.oup.com/us/ingersoll): Chapter summaries, review questions, self-exams, and Google Earth maps with the location of key structures further enhance the text

  • Zagreb: A Cultural History

    For most of its history, Zagreb was a small town to which big things happened. It has been ruled by Hungary and the Habsburg Monarchy, threatened by the Ottomans, and absorbed into Yugoslavia. Today it is the capital city of the newly independent Croatia.
    In Zagreb: A Cultural History, Celia Hawkesworth guides us through a modern city that reflects all the important trends in Central European culture, architecture, and fashion. We visit the city's center, a beautiful "green horseshoe," graced with trees and public gardens, and lined with imposing buildings. Hawkesworth explores this central core and the atmospheric old town on a rise above it, finding a mix of old and modern buildings, a rich cultural tradition, and a vibrant outdoor caf� life. She describes the many statues in the streets and squares, commemorating those who have contributed to the city's unique inner life. She also examines the legacy of outside invasion, fire, earthquakes, and political strife, pointing to the street names that reflect Zagreb's turbulent past. Zagreb illuminates the artistic side of the city, discussing the sculpture of Ivan Mestrovic, the unique collections of paintings in the Strossmayer and Modern Galleries, and the novels and plays of Miroslav Krleza.
    A perfect book for armchair travelers, Zagreb takes us on a captivating tour of one of Eastern Europe's leading cities.

  • The Biographical Encyclopedia of Jazz

    Do you want to know when Duke Ellington was king of The Cotton Club? Have you ever wondered how old Miles Davis was when he got his first trumpet? From birth dates to gig dates and from recordings to television specials, Leonard Feather and Ira Gitler have left no stone unturned in their quest for accurate, detailed information on the careers of 3.300 jazz musicians from around the world. We learn that Duke Ellington worked his magic at The Cotton Club from 1927 to 1931, and that on Miles Davis's thirteenth birthday, his father gave him his first trumpet. Jazz is fast moving, and this edition clearly and concisely maps out an often dizzying web of professional associations. We find, for instance, that when Miles Davis was a St. Louis teenager he encountered Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie for the first time. This meeting proved fateful, and by 1945 a nineteen-year-old Davis had left Juilliard to play with Parker on 52nd Street. Knowledge of these professional alliances, along with the countless others chronicled in this book, are central to tracing the development of significant jazz movements, such as the "cool jazz" that became one of Miles Davis's hallmarks. Arranged alphabetically according to last name, each entry of this book chronologically lists the highlights of every jazz musician's career. Highly accessible and vigorously researched, The Biographical Encyclopedia of Jazz is, quite simply, the most comprehensive jazz encyclopedia available.

  • How to Start Your Own Business

    Many people at one time or another dream of owning their own business. In especially unpredictable economic times, record numbers of people, either by choice or necessity, decide to use their skills and knowledge to start up their own businesses. This practical volume addresses all the major aspects of establishing and managing a small business, including choosing a business, how to legally structure your business, financing, recruiting employees, small business insurance, keeping business records, marketing your business, and more. All the major aspects of establishing and managing a small business are covered here, including choosing a business, how to legally structure your business, financing, recruiting employees, small business insurance, keeping business records, marketing your business, and more. Useful appendices provide statistical detail on growth industries, practical forms including a sample business plan, employment agreement, application for a business loan, and lists of contact information, including a directory of State Departments of Labor and much more. The Legal Almanac series consists of over 75 handy guides for the lay person on all aspects of the law. Each volume includes an overview of the topic followed by chapters on the major issues in that subject. Each volume contains an Appendix containing several primary source documents as well as practical forms and checklists. A Glossary defines any technical terms used in the text.

  • The Beatles As Musicians: The Quarry Men Through Rubber Soul

    The Beatles as Musicians: The Quarry Men through Rubber Soul is a comprehensive, chronologically-ordered study of every aspect of the group's musical life--composition, performance, recording and reception histories--from its beginnings in 1956 through 1965. Richly authoritative interpretations from every available reliable musical document are interwoven through a documentary study of many thousands of audio, video, print, and multimedia sources. The text will enable general readers and musicians as well as educated music theorists to learn new levels of beauty in the music of the Beatles.

  • Electronic and Computer Music

    This is a revised and expanded edition of Peter Manning's classic introduction to electronic and computer music, dealing with the development of electronic and computer music from its birth to the present day. This new edition includes information about software innovations, an increased emphasis on digital media, and discussions of personal music-computing technologies.

  • The Making of Homeric Verse: The Collected Papers of Milman Parry

    This book collects together the major published works, as well as some previously unpublished items, by Parry, who remains a major figure in Homeric studies. His work, which had been edited by his son, connected disparate contentions and observations made by preceding scholars on the Homeric question (as to who composed the poems, for example, and how they were composed). In formulating a consistent picture of what Homeric poetry was and what the conditions were that allowed it to come into being, his work continues to have a major impact in classics. This is a paperback reissue of a title first published by Clarendon Press in 1970.

  • From Disgust to Humanity: Sexual Orientation and Constitutional Law

    A distinguished professor of law and philosophy at the University of Chicago, a prolific writer and award-winning thinker, Martha Nussbaum stands as one of our foremost authorities on law, justice, freedom, morality, and emotion. In From Disgust to Humanity, Nussbaum aims her considerable intellectual firepower at the bulwark of opposition to gay equality: the politics of disgust.

  • Music in China: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture

    Music in China is one of many case-study volumes that can be used along with Thinking Musically, the core book in the Global Music Series. Thinking Musically incorporates music from many diverse cultures and establishes the framework for exploring the practice of music around the world. It sets the stage for an array of case-study volumes, each of which focuses on a single area of the world. Each case study uses the contemporary musical situation as a point of departure, covering historical information and traditions as they relate to the present. Visit www.oup.com/us/globalmusic for a list of case studies in the Global Music Series. The website also includes instructional materials to accompany each study. Music in China offers a unique exploration of the rich, dynamic, and multifaceted Chinese musical landscape. In contrast with previous scholarship-which focused almost exclusively on the role of music in elite culture-this volume takes a balanced look at a variety of traditional and modern genres, including those performed among local and regional folk musicians, in academia, in the media, and on concert stages both inside and outside of China. Using the interrelated themes of identity, modernization, and ideology as a narrative framework, author Frederick Lau discusses the musical features of the selected genres, the processes through which they came into existence, and related socio-political issues. Lau draws on his own extensive fieldwork and performance experience in both mainland China and its diasporic communities to show how the ever-changing Chinese musical tradition takes on particular meanings in China, in overseas Chinese communities, and in diverse international settings. Enhanced by eyewitness accounts of local performances, interviews with key performers, vivid illustrations, and hands-on listening activities, Music in China provides an accessible and engaging introduction to Chinese music. It is packaged with an 80-minute audio CD containing examples of the music discussed in the book.

  • Three Eyes for the Journey: African Dimensions of the Jamaican Religious Experience

    Studies of African-derived religious traditions have generally focused on their retention of African elements. This emphasis, says Dianne Stewart, slights the ways in which communities in the African diaspora have created and formed new religious meaning. In this fieldwork-based study Stewart shows that African people have been agents of their own religious, ritual, and theological formation. She examines the African-derived and African-centered traditions in historical and contemporary Jamaica: Myal, Obeah, Native Baptist, Revival/Zion, Kumina, and Rastafari, and draws on them to forge a new womanist liberation theology for the Caribbean.

  • On Desire: Why We Want What We Want

    A married person falls deeply in love with someone else. A man of average income feels he cannot be truly happy unless he owns an expensive luxury car. A dieter has an irresistible craving for ice cream. Desires often come to us unbidden and unwanted, and they can have a dramatic impact, sometimes changing the course of our lives. In On Desire, William B. Irvine takes us on a wide-ranging tour of our impulses, wants, and needs, showing us where these feelings come from and how we can try to rein them in. Spicing his account with engaging observations by writers like Seneca, Tolstoy, and Freud, Irvine considers the teachings of Buddhists, Hindus, the Amish, Shakers, and Catholic saints, as well as those of ancient Greek and Roman and modern European philosophers. Irvine also looks at what modern science can tell us about desire--such as what happens in the brain when we desire something and how animals evolved particular desires--and he advances a new theory about how desire itself evolved. Irvine also suggests that at the same time that we gained the ability to desire, we were "programmed" to find some things more desirable than others. Irvine concludes that the best way to attain lasting happiness is not to change the world around us or our place in it, but to change ourselves. If we can convince ourselves to want what we already have, we can dramatically enhance our happiness. Brimming with wisdom and practical advice, On Desire offers a thoughtful approach to controlling unwanted passions and attaining a more meaningful life.

  • Global Perspectives on Income Taxation Law

    In Global Perspectives on Income Taxation Law, Reuven Avi-Yonah, Nicola Sartori, and Omri Marian cover basic, corporate and international tax law from a comparative perspective. The book both supplements readings in US tax law courses and serves as a textbook for a comparative tax law class. The book starts with a theoretical analysis of the field of comparative tax law. It then follows the usual order of topics covered in a basic tax course as taught in most U.S. law schools, and for each topic, the authors highlight possible alternatives or policy choices. The authors frequently consider the U.S. approach as a benchmark, comparing it with approaches used in other countries which form an interesting contrast, or a telling similarity. They consider the multiple purposes of studying comparative tax law: helping to advance successful tax reforms, cultural understanding, political values, legal harmonization, and a better understanding of domestic tax laws.

  • Studies in Contemporary Jewry: Studies in Contemporary Jewry, Volume XVIII: Jews and Violence: Images, Ideologies, Realities

    This is the newest volume of the annual Studies In Contemporary Jewry series. It contains original essays on Jews and crime in fact, fantasy, and fiction; verbal and physical violence in Israeli politics; Jews as revolutionaires; armed resistance by Jews in Nazi Germany; ethical dilemmas within the Israeli Defense Forces; violence in Israeli society and social stress; and other topics. As with other volumes, it also contains review essays and book reviews.

  • Evaluating Health Promotion Programs

    This is a comprehensive guide to the frameworks, theories, and methods used to evaluate health promotion programs. The book builds on the author's experience in evaluating health communication projects in the US and developing countries and in teaching evaluation to graduate-level students in public health. It will be of use to both students and researchers and designers involved in all types of evaluation activities. The chapters are divided into three sections. Part I covers health promotion framework and theories, formative research, and process evaluation methods. Part II deals with study designs, the techniques to determine sample selection and size, writing questionnaires, constructing scales, and managing data. Part III uses data from a national campaign to illustrate methods for impact evaluation including basic and advanced statistical analysis. This text provides the tools needed to understand how and why evaluations are conducted, and it will serve as a reference for evaluators. It covers every aspect of he research and evaluation activities needed to assess a health promotion program.

  • Communicating in Groups: Building Relationships for Group Effectiveness

    This revision is suited for Group Communications courses found in nearly all 4-year colleges and universities in the country. While most texts in this market stress the decision-making aspect of group communication to the near exclusion of other topics, Keyton addresses how this very conception is narrow and privileges business groups over all other type of groups. Keyton puts more emphasis on the relational aspects of group communication in her text, examining a variety of group situations.

  • Trial and Error: The American Controversy Over Creation and Evolution

    Trial and Error traces the coverage or lack thereof, of evolution in textbooks used in American public schools from the mid-1800s to the present. While the teaching of Darwinian evolution was common and not controversial in the late 19th century and into the early 20th century, the debates between evolutionists and creationists, those who argue that the Biblical theory of origins deserves equal treatment, have flared throughout the twentieth century--first in the 1920s, most famously in the Scopes trial; again in the 1960s, when the regional legislation banning the teaching of evolution was overturned, notably in Arkansas and Louisiana; and throughout the 1980s with various controversies over science textbooks, including California. Larson proposes to bring the subject up to the present through a discussion of recent trends, including the "intelligent design" movement, led by Phillip Johnson, a revised form of anti-evolutionism that gained popularity on college campuses; the impact of Michael Behe's versions of evolution; and debates over what counts as evidence for and against evolution--all of which have influenced debates over science standards, particularly at state and local levels. This new chapter will chronicle anti-evolution actions in Kansas and elsewhere and counter-actions by the National Academy of Science and other anti-creationist groups. This updated classic work presents a balanced historical interpretation of legal and educational debates over evolutionism, and will appeal to those interested in the fields of history, religion, science, and law.

  • Philosophy of Law: Classic and Contemporary Readings with Commentary

    Ideal for undergraduate courses in philosophy of law, this comprehensive anthology examines such topics as the concept of law, the dispute between natural law theorists and legal positivists, the relations between law and morality, criminal responsibility and legal punishment, the rights of the individual against the state, justice and equality, and legal evidence as compared with scientific evidence. The readings have been selected from both philosophy and law journals and include classic texts, contemporary theoretical developments, and well-known recent court cases. The text features extensive introductions that make even the most profound writings accessible to undergraduates.

  • Sallust's Bellum Catilinae

    In his Bellum Catilinae, C. Sallustius Crispus or Sallust (86-35/34 B.C.E.) recounts the dramatic events of the year 63 B.C.E. when a disgruntled and impoverished nobleman, L. Sergius Catilina, after two electoral defeats, made himself the leader of a group of heavily indebted young aristocrats and the Roman poor and tried to kill his rival Cicero and overthrow the government. With his trademark archaizing style, Sallust skillfully captures the drama of the times, including an early morning raid and the emotionally charged debate in which Caesar and Cato the Younger fight over the lives of the arrested conspirators. Sallust wrote while the Roman Republic was being transformed into an empire during in the turbulent first century BCE. The work is well-suited for second-year or advanced Latin study and gives a fair idea of the richness of Latin literature while also pointing the way to a critical investigation of late-Republican government and historiography. Ramsey's introduction and commentary bring the text to life for Latin students. This new edition includes two maps and two city plans, an updated and now annotated bibliography, a list of divergences from the 1991 Oxford Classical Text of Sallust, and minor revisions in the commentary.

  • Strabismus Surgery: Basic and Advanced Strategies

    A concise, readable description of the best current surgical strategies and examination techniques in the treatment of strabismus, this book comprehensively covers the management of esotropia, exotropia, oblique muscle dysfunction, dissociated strabismus complex, paralytic strabismus, restrictive strabismus, and nystagmus, along with a chapter on reoperation strategies.

  • Latin Word Order: Structured Meaning and Information

    Word order is not a subject anyone reading Latin can afford to ignore: apart from anything else, word order is what gets one from disjoint sentences to coherent text. Reading a paragraph of Latin without attention to the word order entails losing access to a whole dimension of meaning, or at best using inferential procedures to guess at what is actually overtly encoded in the syntax. This book begins by introducing the reader to the linguistic concepts, formalism and analytical techniques necessary for the study of Latin word order. It then proceeds to present and analyze a representative selection of data in sufficient detail for the reader to develop both an intuitive grasp of the often rather subtle principles controlling Latin word order and a theoretically grounded understanding of the system that underlies it. Combining the rich empirical documentation of traditional philological approaches with the deeper theoretical insight of modern linguistics, this work aims to reduce the intricate surface patterns of Latin word order to a simple and general crosscategorial system of syntactic structure which translates more or less directly into constituents of pragmatic and semantic meaning.

  • Wind Talk for Brass: A Practical Guide to Understanding and Teaching Brass Instruments

    Wind Talk for Brass provides instrumental music teachers, practitioners, and students with a handy, easy-to-use pedagogical resource for brass instruments found in school instrumental programs. With thorough coverage of the most common brass instruments - trumpet, horn, trombone, baritone/euphonium, and tuba/sousaphone - the book offers the most topical and information necessary for effective teaching. This includes terminology, topics, and concepts associated with each specific instrument, along with teaching suggestions that can be applied in the classroom. Be sure to look to the back of the book for a "Practical Tips" section, which discusses common technical faults and corrections, common problems with sound (as well as their causes and solutions to them), fingering charts, literature lists (study materials, method books, and solos), as well as a list of additional resources relevant to teaching brass instruments (articles, websites, audio recordings). Without question, Wind Talk for Brass stands alone as an invaluable resource for woodwinds!

  • Neuropsychiatry and Behavioural Neuroscience

    This is the long-awaited new edition of Jeffrey Cummings' classic work, Clinical Neuropsychiatry, originally published in 1985. That book represented an integration of behavioural neurology and biological psychiatry into a single volume devoted to explicating brain-behaviour relationships. It was clinically oriented and intended for practitioners caring for patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. The new title reflects the authors' effort to link the recent explosion of new information from neurochemistry, neuroanatomy, genetics, neuropharmacology, neuropathology, and neuroimaging to the clinical descriptions. Yet the clinical emphasis of its predecessor has been maintained. Each chapter has a consistent approach and the book as whole provides a practical, easy-to-use synthesis of clinical advice and basic science. The volume is enchanced by 4-colour images throughout. It is intended for students, residents, fellows, and practitioners of neurology, psychiatry, neuropsychology, and cognitive neuroscience. It will also be interest to individuals in neuroimaging.

  • The Strange Career of Jim Crow: A Commemorative Edition with a new afterword by William S. McFeely

    Strange Career offers a clear and illuminating analysis of the history of Jim Crow laws and American race relations. This book presented evidence that segregation in the South dated only to the 1880s. It's publication in 1955, a year after the Supreme Court ordered schools be desegregated, helped counter arguments that the ruling would destoy a centuries-old way of life. The commemorative edition includes a special afterword by William S. McFeely, former Woodward student and winner of both the 1982 Pulitzer Prize and 1992 Lincoln Prize. As William McFeely describes in the new afterword, 'the slim volume's social consequence far outstripped its importance to academia. The book became part of a revolution...The Civil Rights Movement had changed Woodward's South and his slim, quietly insistent book...had contributed to that change.'

  • Measuring Health: A guide to rating scales and questionnaires

    Worldwide concerns over the cost of medical care have highlighted the importance of evidence-based medicine. Resulting clinical trials require instruments to monitor the outcome of care and the output of the health system. Measuring Health is a reference text that provides in-depth reviews of over 100 leading health measurements used for these purposes. It guides the reader in choosing among rival methods and provides the information needed to apply and interpret each instrument. The book also provides a technical and historical introduction to the field of health measurement, and discusses future directions in the field. This third edition updates the information on each of the measures previously reviewed; it includes additional measures in each of the chapters and adds a chapter on anxiety measurement. Other chapters include disability, psychological well-being, depression, mental status, social health, pain and quality of life.

  • Aristophanes' Frogs

    Aristophanes is widely credited with having elevated the classical art of comedy to the level of legitimacy and recognition that only tragedy had hitherto achieved. This book provides an invaluable companion to one of Aristophanes' most cherished works, Frogs.

  • The Pope's Daughter: The Extraordinary Life of Felice della Rovere

    The illegitimate daughter of Pope Julius II, Felice della Rovere became one of the most powerful and accomplished women of the Italian Renaissance. Now, Caroline Murphy vividly captures the untold story of a rare woman who moved with confidence through a world of popes and princes. Using a wide variety of sources, including Felice's personal correspondence, as well as diaries, account books, and chronicles of Renaissance Rome, Murphy skillfully weaves a compelling portrait of this remarkable woman. Felice della Rovere was to witness Michelangelo paint the Sistine Chapel, watch her father Pope Julius II lay the foundation stone for the new Saint Peter's, and saw herself immortalized by Raphael in his Vatican frescos. With her marriage to Gian Giordano Orsini--arranged, though not attended, by her father the Pope--she came to possess great wealth and power, assets which she used to her advantage. While her father lived, Felice exercised much influence in the affairs of Rome, even egotiating for peace with the Queen of France. After his death, Felice persevered, making allies of the cardinals and clerics of St. Peter's and maintaining her control of the Orsini land through tenacity, ingenuity, and carefully cultivated political savvy. She survived the Sack of Rome in 1527, but her greatest enemy proved to be her own stepson Napoleone, whose rivalry with his stepbrother Girolamo ended suddenly and violently, and brought her perilously close to losing everything she had spent her life acquiring. With a marvelous cast of characters, The Pope's Daughter is a spellbinding biography set against the brilliant backdrop of Renaissance Rome.

  • Mastery of Your Anxiety and Worry: Workbook (Treatments That Work)

    Do you constantly worry about the "what ifs" of life? Does your anxiety over events that have yet to happen cause you physical discomfort? If you are prone to problems with anxiety and worry, you may suffer from Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD). Those who have been diagnosed with GAD know that it can cause chronic tension, fatigue, irritability and difficulties sleeping. What can be done to help? In recent years it has been proven that the most effective treatment for GAD is a program like the one outlined in this book, based on the principles of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT). Written by renowned therapists, this Workbook includes all the information you need to learn the appropriate skills to combat your anxiety and worry. For use in conjunction with supervised therapy, this book makes it easy for you to become an active participant in your treatment. Bring the workbook to your sessions while your therapist uses the corresponding Mastery of Your Anxiety and Worry, Therapist Guide to teach you techniques to help you relax and decrease your level of anxiety. This revised workbook includes user-friendly devices to aid you in overcoming your excessive worry, such as self-assessment quizzes, homework exercises, and case studies of individuals experiencing the same issues as you. It also includes interactive forms that can be photocopied or downloaded from the companion website, for you to monitor your progress throughout treatment. This one of a kind resource allows you to work alongside your therapist to personalise your treatment strategy and learn recovery skills that are useful for a lifetime.

  • Mastering Your Adult ADHD: Workbook: A cognitive-behavioral treatment program

    Adults who suffer from Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder know that it can have harmful effects in their workplace, in their self-esteem, and in the way they interact with their family and friends. While some medications have been effective in treating adults ADHD, the majority of individuals treated with medications have residual symptoms that require additional skills and symptom management strategies. Used in conjunction with the treatment described in the corresponding Therapist Guide, this Workbook provides effective and practical skills that have been scientifically tested and shown to help adults cope with their ADHD symptoms. The treatment plan contains step-by-step, session-by-session information and materials necessary to participate in this treatment in the context of individual outpatient cognitive behavioural therapy. Clients can be active participants in this therapy by helping to personalize their treatment strategy and monitoring their progress, all toward the goal of learning to overcome their ADHD.

  • Avicenna

    Ibn Sina - Avicenna in Latin - (980-1037) played a considerable role in the development of both eastern and western philosophy and science. His contributions to the fields of logic, natural science, psychology, metaphysics and theology and even medicine are difficult to overstate. The great Islamic philosopher al-Ghazali thought that if one could show the incoherence of Avicenna's thought, then one would have shown the incoherence of philosophy in general. No other author is directly cited by Thomas Aquinas more often than Avicenna. But Avicenna's significance and influence do not stop with the medieval period. His logic, natural philosophy, and metaphysics are still taught in the Islamic world as living philosophy. And many contemporary Catholic and evangelical Christian philosophers still come under his influence through Aquinas's work. Despite Avicenna's important place in the history of ideas, however, there is no single volume that both does justice to the complete range of his intellectual activity and provides a rigorous analysis of the philosophical content of his thought. This book is designed to remedy that lack. It will provide a general introduction to Avicenna's intellectual system and offer a careful philosophical analysis of most of the major aspects of his thought, presented in such a way as to be accessible to students as well as serving as a resource for specialists in Islamic studies, philosophers, and historians of science.

  • Electric Folk: The Changing Face of English Traditional Music

    In Electric Folk - Revival and Transformation of English Traditional Music, Britta Sweers chronicles the history of the genre and explores its cultural implications. She characterizes electric folk as both a result of the American folk revival of the early 1960s and a reaction against the dominance of American pop music abroad. Sweers creates a detailed portrait of the folk rock scene - as cultural phenomenon, commercial entity, and performance style.

  • Origins of Neuroscience: A History of Explorations into Brain Function

    With over 350 illustrations, this impressive volume traces the rich history of ideas about the functioning of the brain from its roots in the ancient cultures of Egypt, Greece, and Rome through the centuries into relatively modern times. In contrast to biographically oriented accounts, this book is unique in its emphasis on the functions of the brain and how they came to be associated with specific brain regions and systems. Among the topics explored are vision, hearing, pain, motor control, sleep, memory, speech, and various other facets of intellect. The emphasis throughout is on presenting material in a very readable way, while describing with scholarly acumen the historical evolution of the field in all its amazing wealth and detail. From the opening introductory chapters to the concluding look at treatments and therapies, this monumental work will captivate readers from cover to cover. It will be valued as both an historical reference and as an exciting tale of scientific discovery. It is bound to attract a wide readership among students and professionals in the neural sciences as well as general readers interested in the history of science and medicine.

  • The Oxford History of the Biblical World

    This is a text-only paperback edition of The Oxford History of the Biblical World. a comprehensive survey of the world from which the Bible emerged. Chronologically ordered, it is an authoritative synthesis written by leading scholars and incorporating the latest archeological discoveries and current methodologies. Chapters present a readable and integrated study of the history, art, architecture, languages, literature, and religion of biblical Israel and early Judaism and Christianity in their larger cultural context. For the paperback edition the maps and tables will remain intact. However, Coogan selects an eight-page black and white insert from the original art program. The art insert compiles the most visually compelling and historical important items that are illustrative of the text.

  • Plato's Symposium

    Oxford Approaches to Classical Literature (Series Editors: Kathleen Coleman and Richard Rutherford) introduces individual works of Greek and Latin literature to readers who are approaching them for the first time. Each volume sets the work in its literary and historical context, and aims to offer a balanced and engaging assessment of its content, artistry, and purpose. A brief survey of the influence of the work upon subsequent generations is included to demonstrate its enduring relevance and power. All quotations from the original are translated into English. Plato's Symposium tells of a dinner party at a crucial point in Athenian history at which the guests decide that they will each in turn deliver a speech in praise of love. The humorous and brilliant work that follows points the way towards all Western thinking about love. The Symposium is also one of Plato's most sophisticated meditations on the practice of philosophy. This book introduces the literary and historical context of Plato's work, surveys and explains the arguments, and considers why Plato has cast this work in a highly unusual narrative form. A final chapter traces the influence of the Symposium from antiquity to the modern day.

  • Hsieh Liang-Tso and the Analects of Confucius: Humane Learning as a Religious Quest

    Hsieh Liang-tso (c.1050-c.1120, known as master Shang-ts'ai) was one of the leading direct disciples of Ch'eng Hao and Ch'eng I, the two brothers who were the early leaders of the Confucian revival known as Neo-Confucianism in Northern Sung China. Hsieh was thus among the first to recognize and follow the insights of the Ch'eng brothers as definitive of the authentic Confucian tradition, a recognition that became the conviction of the majority of later Confucian scholars and practitioners. The present book is a focused analysis of the core value of Confucian thought, namely jen (humanity or co-humanity), through an investigation of Hsieh Liang-tso's analysis of the Analects of Confucius. Selover argues that Hsieh's handling of key issues in interpreting and applying the Confucian Analects, his experiential reasoning and his deference to scriptural classics and earlier tradition, bear important similarities to the practice of theology in Western religious traditions. The volume also contains a translation of Hsieh's commentary on the Analects, as well as a foreword by the renowned scholar of Confucianism, Tu Wei-ming.

  • Teaching Freud

    As one of the first theorists to explore the unconscious fantasies, fears, and desires underlying religious ideas and practices, Freud can be considered one of the grandparents of the field of religious studies. Yet Freud's legacy is deeply contested. His reputation is perhaps at its lowest point since he came to public attention a century ago, and students often assume that Freud is sexist, dangerous, passe, and irrelevant to the study of religion. How can Freud be taught in this climate of critique and controversy? The fourteen contributors to this volume, recognised scholars of religion and psychoanalysis, describe how they address Freud's contested legacy: 'they teach the debates'. They describe their courses on Freud and religion, their innovative pedagogical practices, and the creative ways they work with resistance.

  • Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart

    Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart invites readers to embark on a new journey into a land of rationality that differs from the familiar territory of cognitive science and economics. Traditional views of rationality tend to see decision makers as possessing superhuman powers of reason, limitless knowledge, and all of eternity in which to ponder choices. To understand decisions in the real world, we need a different, more psychologically plausible notion of rationality, and this book provides it. It is about fast and frugal heuristics--simple rules for making decisions when time is pressing and deep thought an unaffordable luxury. These heuristics can enable both living organisms and artificial systems to make smart choices, classifications, and predictions by employing bounded rationality. But when and how can such fast and frugal heuristics work? Can judgments based simply on one good reason be as accurate as those based on many reasons? Could less knowledge even lead to systematically better predictions than more knowledge? Simple Heuristics explores these questions, developing computational models of heuristics and testing them through experiments and analyses. It shows how fast and frugal heuristics can produce adaptive decisions in situations as varied as choosing a mate, dividing resources among offspring, predicting high school drop out rates, and playing the stock market. As an interdisciplinary work that is both useful and engaging, this book will appeal to a wide audience. It is ideal for researchers in cognitive psychology, evolutionary psychology, and cognitive science, as well as in economics and artificial intelligence. It will also inspire anyone interested in simply making good decisions.

  • Your Money or Your Life: Strong Medicine for America's Health Care System

    The problems of medical care confront us daily: a bureaucracy that makes a trip to the doctor worse than a trip to the dentist, doctors who can't practice medicine the way they choose, more than 40 million people without health insurance. "Medical care is in crisis," we are repeatedly told, and so it is. Barely one in five Americans thinks the medical system works well. Enter David M. Cutler, a Harvard economist who served on President Clinton's health care task force and later advised presidential candidate Bill Bradley. One of the nation's leading experts on the subject, Cutler argues in Your Money or Your Life that health care has in fact improved exponentially over the last fifty years, and that the successes of our system suggest ways in which we might improve care, make the system easier to deal with, and extend coverage to all Americans. Cutler applies an economic analysis to show that our spending on medicine is well worth it--and that we could do even better by spending more. Further, millions of people with easily manageable diseases, from hypertension to depression to diabetes, receive either too much or too little care because of inefficiencies in the way we reimburse care, resulting in poor health and in some cases premature death. The key to improving the system, Cutler argues, is to change the way we organize health care. Everyone must be insured for the medical system to perform well, and payments should be based on the quality of services provided not just on the amount of cutting and poking performed. Lively and compelling, Your Money or Your Life offers a realistic yet rigorous economic approach to reforming health care--one that promises to break through the stalemate of failed reform.

  • The Paleobiology of the Pavlovian People

    This is primary descriptive volume on the most important paleontological site for research into the emergence of humans, the development of a modern pattern of hunting and gathering societies in the Middle Upper Paleolithic Era. Erik Trinkhaus is among the most distinguished paleoanthropologists and a member of the National Academy. Svoboda is the project leader on the Pavlovian site.

  • The Score, the Orchestra, and the Conductor

    In The Score, The Orchestra, and the Conductor, internationally-renowned conducting instructor Gustav Meier presents his practical approach to preparing an orchestral score for rehearsal and performance. Well-illustrated with numerous music examples, charts, figures, and tables, Meier's methods, grounded in the rich body of his collected experience as a music director and teacher of conducting students, are explained in great detail. Meier covers all aspects of conducting from experimenting without the orchestra to creating signals that produce the desired sound. The methods he describes offer specific and readily applicable advice for virtually every musical and technical decision that occurs in the important phase between when a conductor first decides upon a specific score and the first rehearsal with an orchestra. And from ear training to working with musicians to programming, he also offers his expertise on the day-to-day aspects of conducting and musical performance. The Score, The Orchestra, and the Conductor will be an indispensable and often-read contribution to the library of every music director and conducting student.

  • Writings on Music,: 1965-2000

    In the mid-1960s, Steve Reich radically renewed the musical landscape with a back-to-basics sound that came to be called Minimalism. These early works, characterized by a relentless pulse and static harmony, focused single-mindedly on the process of gradual rhythmic change. Throughout his career, Reich has continued to reinvigorate the music world, drawing from a wide array of classical, popular, sacred, and non-western idioms. His works reflect the steady evolution of an original musical mind. Writings on Music documents the creative journey of this thoughtful, groundbreaking composer. These 64 short pieces include Reich's 1968 essay "Music as a Gradual Process," widely considered one of the most influential pieces of music theory in the second half of the 20th century. Subsequent essays, articles, and interviews treat Reich's early work with tape and phase shifting, showing its development into more recent work with speech melody and instrumental music. Other essays recount his exposure to non-western music -- African drumming, Balinese gamelan, Hebrew cantillation -- and the influence of these musics as structures and not as sounds. The writings include Reich's reactions to and appreciations of the works of his contemporaries (John Cage, Luciano Berio, Morton Feldman, Gyorgy Ligeti) and older influences (Kurt Weill, Schoenberg). Each major work of the composer's career is also explored through notes written for performances and recordings. Paul Hillier, himself a respected figure in the early music and new music worlds, has revisited these texts, working with the author to clarify their central narrative: the aesthetic and intellectual development of an influential composer. For long-time listeners and young musicians recently introduced to his work, this book provides an opportunity to get to know Reich's music in greater depth and perspective.

  • Financial Ethics: A Positivist Analysis

    Financial Ethics: A Positivist Analysis provides a framework for the study of financial ethics built on a broad review of mainstream scholarly research published in refereed finance and economics journals. The work is aimed directly at financial academics and students who are likely to be familiar with mainstream financial economics research. It demonstrates that ethics is already an important part of financial research, and therefore the approach taken here is more of a "rediscovery" of the ethical dimension of financial economics. This approach is important not only to remind fellow academics that ethics is a legitimate area of interest to positive financial economics, but also to encourage them to convey this message to their students without departing from mainstream financial theories and models. A distinctive feature of the text is that it adopts a positivist framework for the field of financial ethics. The text proposes that many "finance" problems are actually "ethics" problems; and that many economic phenomena such as monitoring, bonding, certification, signaling, incentive contracts, and governance structures can be explained as mechanisms for controlling moral risks. The text discusses several examples in which an ethics-centered approach to understanding economic phenomena is similar in spirit to other frameworks which have been applied in positive financial research including: the framework used for understanding corporate governance mechanisms as devices for mitigating agency costs and "moral hazards" in contractual relationships; the transaction "governance structure" framework that can explain the existence of hierarchies relative to markets when opportunistic behavior is assumed; and the roles of reputation and corporate culture in making credible commitments of trust in exchange. These "financial ethical technologies" are not mutually exclusive but, rather, mutually enriching ways to deepen our understanding of the same economic phenomena. They are financial technologies because they enhance economic value; and, they are ethical technologies because their value enhancing contributions are produced by mitigating moral risks in exchange.

  • Moses Maimonides: The Man and His Works

    Moses Maimonides, rabbinist, philosopher, and physician, had a greater impact on Jewish history than any other medieval figure. Born in Cordova, Spain, in 1137 or 1138, he spent a few years in Morocco, visited Palestine, and settled in Egypt by 1167. He died there in 1204. Maimonides was a man of superlatives. He wrote the first commentary to cover the entire Mishna corpus; composed what quickly became the dominant work on the 613 commandments believed to have been given by God to Moses; produced the most comprehensive and most intensely studied code of rabbinic law to emerge from the Middle Ages; and his Guide for the Perplexed has had a greater influence on Jewish thought than any other Jewish philosophic work. During the last decades of his life, he conducted an active medical practice, which extended into the royal court--the Sultan Saladin is reported to have been his patient--and composed some ten or eleven works on medicine. This book offers a fresh look at every aspect of Maimonides' life and works: the course of his life, his education, his personality, and his rabbinic, philosophical, and medical writings. At a number of junctures, Davidson points out that information about Maimonides which has been accepted for decades or centuries as common knowledge is in actuality supported by no credible evidence and often, more disconcertingly, is patently incorrect. Maimonides' diverse writings are frequently viewed as expressions of several distinct personas, uncomfortably and awkwardly bundled into a single human frame; the present book treats his writings as expressions of a single, integrated, albeit complex, mind.

  • The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries Are Failing and What Can Be Done About It

    In the universally acclaimed and award-winning The Bottom Billion, Paul Collier reveals that fifty failed states--home to the poorest one billion people on Earth--pose the central challenge of the developing world in the twenty-first century. The book shines much-needed light on this group of small nations, largely unnoticed by the industrialized West, that are dropping further and further behind the majority of the world's people, often falling into an absolute decline in living standards. A struggle rages within each of these nations between reformers and corrupt leaders--and the corrupt are winning. Collier analyzes the causes of failure, pointing to a set of traps that ensnare these countries, including civil war, a dependence on the extraction and export of natural resources, and bad governance. Standard solutions do not work, he writes; aid is often ineffective, and globalization can actually make matters worse, driving development to more stable nations. What the bottom billion need, Collier argues, is a bold new plan supported by the Group of Eight industrialized nations. If failed states are ever to be helped, the G8 will have to adopt preferential trade policies, new laws against corruption, new international charters, and even conduct carefully calibrated military interventions. Collier has spent a lifetime working to end global poverty. In The Bottom Billion, he offers real hope for solving one of the great humanitarian crises facing the world today.

    "Set to become a classic. Crammed with statistical nuggets and common sense, his book should be compulsory reading."
    --The Economist

    "If Sachs seems too saintly and Easterly too cynical, then Collier is the authentic old Africa hand: he knows the terrain and has a keen ear.... If you've ever found yourself on one side or the other of those arguments--and who hasn't?--then you simply must read this book."
    --Niall Ferguson, The New York Times Book Review

    "Rich in both analysis and recommendations.... Read this book. You will learn much you do not know. It will also change the way you look at the tragedy of persistent poverty in a world of plenty."
    --Financial Times

  • Sound Advice: Becoming a Better Children's Choir Conductor

    Always a vital part of community cultural life, children's choirs can be small amateur clubs or sophisticated arts organizations on a par with adult professional choirs and orchestras. Whatever a choir's size and ambitions, its director faces a formidable challenge. Jean Ashworth Bartle, director of the award-winning Toronto Children's Chorus, has collected her experience and wisdom in Sound Advice. In a clear and direct style, the book offers tips on basics such as conducting fun, effective rehearsals and advanced projects including recording and touring. Stressing that the choir director's fundamental task is to develop musicianship through singing, Bartle suggests skill-building exercises and interactive rehearsal techniques. The book's appendixes form a sourcebook of warm-ups, repertoire, and suggested programmes, providing several seasons' worth of inspiration. For teachers just starting out with their choirs, students of the child voice and teaching methods, and experienced choir directors seeking to take their students one step further, Sound Advice will benefit all choir directors who want their choirs to reach a higher level of artistry, musicianship and skill.

  • Comparative Developmental Physiology: Contributions, Tools, and Trends

    This book presents assessments of current work in the field of developmental physiology from experimental, theoretical, and molecular perspectives, with an intent to predict the future directions this key area will take. The authors have been well-selected to provide a satisfying overview of an emerging area, which is relevant to the research of physiologists, ecologists, evolutionary biologists, and developmental biologists.

  • Creating the Twentieth Century: Technical Innovations of 1867-1914 and Their Lasting Impact

    The period between 1867 and 1914 remains the greatest watershed in human history since the emergence of settled agricultural societies: the time when an expansive civilization based on synergy of fuels, science, and technical innovation was born. At its beginnings in the 1870s were dynamite, the telephone, photographic film, and the first light bulbs. Its peak decade - the astonishing 1880s - brought electricity - generating plants, electric motors, steam turbines, the gramophone, cars, aluminum production, air-filled rubber tires, and prestressed concrete. And its post-1900 period saw the first airplanes, tractors, radio signals and plastics, neon lights and assembly line production. This book is a systematic interdisciplinary account of the history of this outpouring of European and American intellect and of its truly epochal consequences. It takes a close look at four fundamental classes of these epoch-making innovations: formation, diffusion, and standardization of electric systems; invention and rapid adoption of internal combustion engines; the unprecedented pace of new chemical syntheses and material substitutions; and the birth of a new information age. These chapters are followed by an evaluation of the lasting impact these advances had on the 20th century, that is, the creation of high-energy societies engaged in mass production aimed at improving standards of living.

  • Custodial Rights

    This almanac explores the many facets of the law of child custody, and provides a brief history of child custody decision-making in the United States. The modern-day standards by which courts award custody is discussed, including the factors a court considers in making a custody determination. The various types of custody arrangements presently available are also examined. Other topics covered here include the custodial rights of unmarried parents and step-parents, recent rulings concerning the parental status of same-sex partners, impact of reproductive technology in custody cases, interstate and international custody litigation, and parental abduction, as well as the custody-related topics of visitation, paternity, child support, and child abuse. The Legal Almanac Series consists of over 75 titles and serves to educate the general public on a variety of legal issues pertinent to everyday life. Each volume includes an overview of the topic followed by chapters on the major issues in that subject, an Appendix containing several primary source documents as well as practical forms and checklists. A Glossary defines any technical terms used in the text.

  • What Everyone Needs to Know About Islam: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions, From One of the America's Leading Experts

    In the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of September 11th, there has been an overwhelming demand for information about Islam. As a leading expert, John Esposito has found himself called upon to speak to a wide range of audiences, including members of Congress, the Bush administration, government agencies, the military, and the media. Out of this experience, he has identified the most pressing questions people consistently ask about Islam. In What Everyone Needs to Know about Islam, Esposito presents in question-and-answer format the information that most people want to know. Esposito provides succinct, accessible, sensitive, and even-handed answers to questions that range from the general--"What do Muslims believe?" and "Who was Muhammad?"--to more specific issues like Is Islam compatible with modernization, capitalism and democracy? How do Muslims view Judaism and Christianity? Are women second-class citizens in Islam? What is jihad? Does the Quran condone terrorism? What does Islam say about homosexuality, birth control, abortion, and slavery? As the editor of The Oxford Encyclopedia of Modern Islam and The Oxford History of Islam, and author of Unholy War and many other acclaimed works, John Esposito is one of America's leading authorities on Islam. This brief and readable book is the first place to look for information on the faith, customs, and political beliefs of the more than one billion people who call themselves Muslims.

  • Fitting Models to Biological Data Using Linear and Nonlinear Regression: A Practical Guide to Curve Fitting

    Most biologists use nonlinear regression more than any other statistical technique, but there are very few places to learn about curve-fitting. This book, by the author of the very successful Intuitive Biostatistics, addresses this relatively focused need of an extraordinarily broad range of scientists. The book will likely be purchased by a high proportion of biological laboratories, for frequent reference. The author gets about 3000 visits per month to his curvefit website, with the average visitor viewing 9 pages.

  • Wall Street: A History: From Its Beginnings to the Fall of Enron

    In the seven years since the publication of the first edition of Wall Street, America's financial industry has undergone a series of wrenching events that have dramatically changed the nation's economic landscape. The bull market of the 1990's came to a close, ushering in the end of the dot com boom, a record number of mergers occurred, and accounting scandals in companies like Enron and WorldCom shook the financial industry to its core. In this wide-ranging volume, financial historian Charles Geisst provides the first history of Wall Street, explaining how a small, concentrated pocket of lower Manhattan came to have such enormous influence in national and world affairs. In this updated edition, Geisst sums up the recent turbulence that has threatened America's financial industry. He shows how in 1997 thirty NASDAQ market makers paid a record $1.3 billion fine for price irregularities in stocks. He makes sense of the closing of the bull market, and explains a major change in the accounting rules for mergers that caused monumental losses for companies like AOL Time Warner. And he recounts how in the aftermath of the speculative fever that swept Wall Street in the 1990's, the scandals at Enron, Tyco, Worldcom, and Conseco represent a last gasp of mergermania and a fallout from a bubble-like market. Wall Street is at once the story of the street itself, from the days when the wall was merely a defensive barricade built by Peter Stuyvesant, to the modern billion-dollar computer-driven colossus of today. In a broader sense it is an engaging economic history of the United States, the role Wall Street played in making America the most powerful economy in the world, and the many challenges to that role it has faced in recent years.

  • Country, Park & City: The Architecture and Life of Calvert Vaux

    After beginning his career as an architect in London, Calvert Vaux (1824-1895) came to the Hudson River valley in 1850 at the invitation of Andrew Jackson Downing, the reform-minded writer on houses and gardens. As Downing's partner, and after Downing's death in 1852, Vaux designed country and suburban dwellings that were remarkable for their well-conceived plans and their sensitive rapport with nature. By 1857, the year he published his book Villas and Cottages, Vaux had moved to New York City. There he asked Frederick Law Olmsted to join him in preparing a design for Central Park. He spent the next 38 years defending and refining their vision of Central Park as a work of art. After the Civil War, he and Olmsted led the nascent American park movement with their designs for parks and parkways in Brooklyn, Buffalo, and many other American cities. Apart from undertakings with Olmsted, Vaux cultivated a distinguished architectural practice. Among his clients were the artist Frederic Church, whose dream house, Olana, he helped create; and the reform politician Samuel Tilden, whose residence on New York's Gramercy Park remains one of the country's outstanding Victorian buildings. A pioneering advocate for apartment houses in American cities, Vaux designed buildings that mirrored the advance of urbanization in America, including early model housing for the poor. He planned the original portions of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the American Museum of Natural History and conceived a stunning proposal for a vast iron and glass building to house the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. Especially notable are the many bridges and other charming structures that he designed for Central Park. Vaux considered the Park's Terrace, decorated by J. W. Mould, as his greatest achievement. An active participant in the cultural and intellectual life of New York, Vaux was an idealist who regarded himself as an artist and a professional. And while much has been written on Olmsted, comparatively little has been published about Vaux. The first in-depth account of Vaux's career, Country, Park, and City should be of great interest to historians of art, architecture, and urbanism, as well as preservationists and other readers interested in New York City's past and America's first parks.

  • The Oxford Handbook of Intellectual Disability and Development

    Though the tremendous amount of recently-emerged developmentally-oriented research has produced much progress in understanding the personality, social, and emotional characteristics of persons with intellectual disabilities (ID), there is still much we don't know, and the vast task of precisely charting functioning in all these areas, while also identifying the associated fine-tuned, complex, and intertwined questions that crop up along the way, seems daunting and insurmountable. The goal of The Oxford Handbook of Intellectual Disability and Development is to update the field with new, precise research and sophisticated theory regarding individuals with ID provided by seasoned developmental theorists who have made original conceptual contributions to the field. This volume is divided into five general sections (ID and its connection to genetics, relationships, cognitive development, socio-emotional development, and development of language), with each focused on a domain of functioning or aspect of life that is inherent to an integrated, transactional perspective of development. While developmental approaches to understanding persons with intellectual disability will continue to emerge, this comprehensive volume is a must-read for specialists and developmental psychologists who must have the conceptual foundations for examining the developmental trajectories across persons with any of the many different ID etiologies.

  • Computer Architecture: From Microprocessors to Supercomputers

    PART I: sets the stage, provides context, reviews some of the prerequisite topics and gives a taste of what is to come in the rest of the book. Included are two refresher-type chapters on digital circuits and components, a discussion of types of computer systems, an overview of digital computer technology, and a detailed perspective on computer system 3erformance. PART II:lays out the user's interface to computer hardware known as the instruction-set architechture (ISA). For better understanding, the instruction set of MiniMIPS (a simplified, yet very realistic, machine for which open reference material and simulation tools exist) is described. Included is a chapter on variations in ISA (e.g. RISC vs CISC) and associated cost performace tradeoffs. The next two parts cover the central processing unit (CPU). PART III: describes the structure of arithmetic/logic units (ALUs) in some detail. Included are discussions of fixed- and floating-point number representations, design of high-speed adders, shift and logical operations, and hardware multipliers/dividers. Implementation aspects and pitfalls of floating-point arthimetic are also discussed. PART IV: is devoted to data path and control circuits comprising the CPU. Beginning with instruction execution steps, the needed components and control mechanisms are derived. These are followed by an exposition of control design strategies, use of a pipelined data path for performance enhancement, and various limitations of pipelining due to data and control dependencies. PART V: concerned with the memory system. The technologies in use for primary and secondary memories are described, along with their strengths and limitations. It is shown how the use of cache memories effectively bridges the speed gap between CPU and main memory. Similarly, the use of virtual memory to provide the illusion of a vast main memory is explained. PART VI: deals with input/output and interfacing topics. A discussion of I/O device technologies is followed by methods of I/O programming and the roles of buses and links (including standards) in I/O communication and interfacing. Elements of processes and context switching, for exception handling or multireaded computation, are also covered. PART VII: introduces advanced architectures. An overview of performance enhancement strategies, beyond simple pipelining, is presented and examples of applications requiring higher performance are cited. These are followed by design strategies and example architectures based on vector or array proccessing, multiprocessing, and multicomputing.

  • Diaspora of the Gods: Modern Hindu Temples in an Urban Middle-Class World

    Many Hindus today are urban middle-class people with religious values similar to those of their professional counterparts in America and Europe. Just as modern professionals continue to build new churches, synagogues, and now mosques, Hindus are erecting temples to their gods wherever their work and their lives take them. Despite the perceived exoticism of Hindu worship, the daily life-style of these avid temple patrons differs little from their suburban neighbors. Joanne Waghorne leads her readers on a journey through this new middle-class Hindu diaspora, focusing on their efforts to build and support places of worship. She seeks to trace the changing religious sensibilities of the middle classes as written on their temples and on the faces of their gods. She offers detailed comparisons of temples in Chennai (formerly Madras), London, and Washington, D.C., and interviews temple priests, devotees, and patrons. In the process, she illuminates the interrelationships between ritual worship and religious edifices, the rise of the modern world economy, and the ascendancy of the great middle class. The result is a comprehensive portrait of Hinduism as lived today by so many both in India and throughout the world. Lavishly illustrated with professional photographs by Dick Waghorne, this book will appeal to art historians as well as urban anthropologists, scholars of religion, and those interested in diaspora, transnationalism, and trends in contemporary religion. It should be especially appealing for course use because it introduces the modern Hinduism practiced by the friends and neighbors of students in the U.S. and Britain.

  • Classical Form: A Theory of Formal Functions for the Instrumental Music of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven

    Building on ideas first advanced by Arnold Schoenberg and later developed by Erwin Ratz, this book introduces a new theory of form for instrumental music in the classical style. The theory provides a broad set of principles and a comprehensive methodology for the analysis of classical form, from individual ideas, phrases, and themes to the large-scale organization of complete movements. It emphasizes the notion of formal function, that is, the specific role a given formal unit plays in the structural organization of a classical work.

  • Lost Scriptures

    While most people think that the twenty-seven books of the New Testament are the only sacred writings of the early Christians, this is not at all the case. A companion volume to Bart Ehrman's Lost Christianities, this book offers an anthology of up-to-date and readable translations of many non-canonical writings from the first centuries after Christ--texts that have been for the most part lost or neglected for almost two millennia. Here is an array of remarkably varied writings from early Christian groups whose visions of Jesus differ dramatically from our contemporary understanding. Readers will find Gospels supposedly authored by the apostle Philip, James the brother of Jesus, Mary Magdalen, and others. There are Acts originally ascribed to John and to Thecla, Paul's female companion; there are Epistles allegedly written by Paul to the Roman philosopher Seneca. And there is an apocalypse by Simon Peter that offers a guided tour of the afterlife, both the glorious ecstasies of the saints and the horrendous torments of the damned, and an Epistle by Titus, a companion of Paul, which argues page after page against sexual love, even within marriage, on the grounds that physical intimacy leads to damnation. In all, the anthology includes fifteen Gospels, five non-canonical Acts of the Apostles, thirteen Epistles, a number of Apocalypses and Secret Books, and several Canon lists. Ehrman has included a general introduction, plus brief introductions to each piece. This important anthology gives readers a vivid picture of the range of beliefs that battled each other in the first centuries of the Christian era.

  • The Internet As a Large-Scale Complex System

    The Internet may be viewed as a "complex system" with diverse features and many components that can give rise to unexpected emergent phenomena, revealing much about its own engineering. This book brings together chapter contributions from a workshop held at the Santa Fe Institute in March 2001. This volume captures a snapshot of some features of the Internet that may be fruitfully approached using a complex systems perspective, meaning using interdisciplinary tools and methods to tackle the subject area. The Internet penetrates the socioeconomic fabric of everyday life; a broader and deeper grasp of the Internet may be needed to meet the challenges facing the future. The resulting empirical data have already proven to be invaluable for gaining novel insights into the network's spatio-temporal dynamics, and can be expected to become even more important when tryin to explain the Internet's complex and emergent behavior in terms of elementary networking-based mechanisms. The discoveries of fractal or self-similar network traffic traces, power-law behavior in network topology and World Wide Web connectivity are instances of unsuspected, emergent system traits. Another important factor at the heart of fair, efficient, and stable sharing of network resources is user behavior. Network systems, when habited by selfish or greedy users, take on the traits of a noncooperative multi-party game, and their stability and efficiency are integral to understanding the overall system and its dynamics. Lastly, fault-tolerance and robustness of large-scale network systems can exhibit spatial and temporal correlations whose effective analysis and management may benefit from rescaling techniques applied in certain physical and biological systems. The present book will bring together several of the leading workers involved in the analysis of complex systems with the future development of the Internet.

  • The Broken Mirror: Understanding and Treating Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Jane is an attractive woman in her mid-thirties, tall, thin and stately. She believes she is breathtakingly ugly. Tormented by what she sees as her huge nose, crooked lip, big jaw, fat buttocks, and tiny breasts, she hasn't left her house in six years. Though she lives in the same house as her mother, she once went two years without seeing her. When relatives come over, she avoids them, hiding in her room, even on Thanksgiving. The one time she left the house - forced to see a doctor - she covered her face with bandages. Eventually, she attempted suicide. "I can't imagine any suffering greater than this," she said. "If I had my choice, I'd rather be blind or have my arm cut off. I'd be happy to have cancer." Jane has body dysmorphic disorder, or BDD. In this revised and expanded edition of The Broken Mirror, Dr Katherine Phillips draws on years of scientific research, clinical practice, and detailed interviews with patients to bring readers an updated and expanded book on this troubling and sometimes debilitating disorder, in which sufferers are obsessed with perceived flaws in their appearance. Phillips describes severe cases, such as Jane's, but also milder cases, such as Carl, a successful lawyer who uses work to distract him from his slightly thinning hair. Many sufferers function well, but remain secretly obsessed by their "hideous acne" or "horrible nose", sneaking constant peaks at a pocket mirror, or spending hours redoing makeup. BDD afflict millions of people. It isn't an uncommon disorder, simply a hidden one, since sufferers are often embarrassed to tell even their closest friends about their concerns; one woman, after fifty years of marriage, still kept her appearance worries a secret from her husband. This revised and expanded edition of The Broken Mirror provides updated information from recent research that sheds new light on this serious illness. Besides the fascinating story of the disorder itself, The Broken Mirror is also a lifesaving handbook for sufferers, their families, and their doctors. Left untreated, the torment of BDD can lead to hospitalization and sometimes suicide. With treatment, many sufferers are able to lead normal lives. Phillips provides a quick self-assessment questionnaire, helping readers distinguish between normal appearance concerns and the obsession of BDD to determine whether they or someone they know have BDD. She includes common clues to BDD - such as frequent mirror checking, covering up with clothing, and excessive exercise. Four new chapters on treatment contain updated information and recommendations on how to effectively treat BDD - as well as frequently obtained treatments that should be avoided. A revised chapter offers helpful advice and reassurance for friends and families of BDD sufferers. Profoundly affected by the disorder themselves, those who care about someone with BDD will find both helpful advice and reassurance in this indispensable book. The revised and expanded edition of The Broken Mirror is the most comprehensive book on BDD and is written by the leading expert on this disorder. It is essential reading for psychiatrists, other mental health professionals, dermatologists and plastic surgeons; for the friends and family concerned about a loved one who won't believe their reassurance; and for the millions who suffer from BDD in silence and secrecy.

  • A Conspiracy So Immense: The World of Joe McCarthy

    A masterful biography of Senator Joe McCarthy with new material (either foreword or afterword).

  • The Bacteriophages

    This book describes the fundamental biology and applications of the bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria. It provides a current guide to each major phage family, highlights interesting topics, and provides a description of the kinds of phages that are associated with the major classes of eubacteria and archaea.

  • Music in Central Java: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture

    Music in Central Java: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture, is one of the case study volumes in the Global Music Series, edited by Bonnie Wade and Patricia Shenhan Campbell. This volume describes the adventures of two central characteres: John an American student who travels to Java and Joko, a Javanese musician. Their adventures and exploits lead them through Javanese society and as they travel they explore the variety and range of instruments and perormance styles through out central JAva. Flexibility, appropriateness and intergration are the three themes that drive Javanese musical culture, and this book pays particular attention to them as well as to Javanese musicians. While gamelan is the focus of the text, the author also provides a broad survey of the other types of music that may be found in Central Java. This book introduces cultural and social processes and the values of music in Javanese life. The text features eye witnessaccounts of performances, interviews with key performers, hands-on activities, vivid illustrations and a 70 minute CD of the author's field recordings.

  • Oxford American Handbook of Clinical Dentistry

    Written by leading American practitioners, the Oxford American Handbooks in Medicine each offer a pocket-sized overview of an entire specialty, featuring instant access to guidance on the conditions that are most likely to be encountered. Precise and prescriptive, the handbooks offer up-to-date advice on examination, investigations, common procedures, and in-patient care. These books will be invaluable resources for residents and students, as well as a useful reference for practitioners. The Oxford Handbook of Clinical Dentistry is a dependable manual geared for ultra-quick reference at any time. Part of the worldwide best-selling series, this book provides much more information than a standard handbook in the field. Thin and light, it uses concise, bulleted text, quick reference tabs, four color presentation, and bookmark ribbons to help provide fast answers on the ward. It is ideal for students, residents and anyone wanting a succinct, comprehensive, and affordable volume in the proven format of the Oxford Handbook Series.

  • A Map of Misreading: with a New Preface

    In print for twenty-seven years, A Map of Misreading serves as a companion volume to Bloom's other seminal work, The Anxiety of Influence. In this finely crafted text, Bloom offers instruction in how to read a poem, using his theory that patterns of imagery in poems represent both a response to and a defense against the influence of precursor poems. Influence, as Bloom conceives it, means that there are no texts, but only relationships between texts. Bloom discusses British and American poets including Milton, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Whitman, Dickinson, Stevens, Warren, Ammons and Ashbery. A full-scale reading of one poem, Browning's "Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came," represents this struggle between one poet and his precursors, the poem serving as a map for readers through the many versions of influence from Milton to modern poets. For the first time, in a new preface, Bloom will consider the map of misreading drawn by contemporary poets such as Ann Carson and Henri Cole. Bloom's new exploration of contemporary poetry over the last twenty years will illuminate how modern texts relate to previous texts, and contribute to the literary legacy of their predecessors.

  • Tending the Heart of Virtue: How Classic Stories Awaken a Child's Moral Imagination

    As the popularity of William Bennett's Book of Virtues attests, parents are turning more and more to children's literature to help instill values in their kids. Now, in this elegantly written and passionate book, Vigen Guroian provides the perfect complement to books such as Bennett's, offering parents and teachers a much-needed roadmap to some of our finest children's stories. Guroian illuminates the complex ways in which fairy tales and fantasies educate the moral imagination from earliest childhood. Examining a wide range of stories--from "Pinocchio" and "The Little Mermaid" to "Charlotte's Web," "The Velveteen Rabbit," "The Wind in the Willows," and the "Chronicles of Narnia"--he argues that these tales capture the meaning of morality through vivid depictions of the struggle between good and evil, in which characters must make difficult choices between right and wrong, or heroes and villains contest the very fate of imaginary worlds. Character and the virtues are depicted compellingly in these stories; the virtues glimmer as if in a looking glass, and wickedness and deception are unmasked of their pretensions to goodness and truth. We are made to face the unvarnished truth about ourselves, and what kind of people we want to be. Throughout, Guroian highlights the classical moral virtues such as courage, goodness, and honesty, especially as they are understood in traditional Christianity. At the same time, he so persuasively evokes the enduring charm of these familiar works that many readers will be inspired to reread their favorites and explore those they may have missed.

  • The African American National Biography: 8 Volume Set

    An eight-volume reference set containing over 4,000 entries written and signed by distinguished scholars and under the direction of Editors in Chief Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, the African American National Biography is the most significant and expansive compilation of black lives in print today. This landmark scholarly reference work will present history through the lives of its people, profiling many well-known individuals but also many names largely lost or forgotten over time. Covering the full panoply of life for almost five centuries (from the arrival of Esteban in Spanish Florida in 1528 to notable black citizens of the present day), this major reference project collects and resurrects the lives of thousands of African Americans revealing an intimate and textured history. The individuals in these biographical entries (both alive and deceased) are slaves and abolitionists; writers; politicians and business people; musicians and dancers; artists and athletes; victims of injustice and the lawyers, journalists, and civil right leaders who gave them a voice. Their experiences and accomplishments each provided a piece of the collective biographical history of African Americans in America. Finally, through the AANB, these important lives and contributions have been restored and recorded and made accessible to all students, teachers, scholars, and anyone interested in African American history.

  • Armed Struggle: The History of the IRA

    The IRA has been a much richer, more complexly layered, and more protean organization than is frequently recognized. It is also more open to balanced examination now--at the end of its long war in the north of Ireland--than it was even a few years ago. Richard English's brilliant book offers a detailed history of the IRA, providing invaluable historical depth to our understanding of the modern-day Provisionals, the more militant wing formed in 1969 dedicated to the removal of the British Government from Northern Ireland and the reunification of Ireland. English examines the dramatic events of the Easter Rising in 1916 and the bitter guerrilla war of 1919-21, the partitioning of Ireland in the 1920s, and the Irish Civil War of 1922-23. Here, too, are the IRA campaigns in Northern Ireland and Britain from the 1930s through the 1960s. He shows how the Provisionals were born out of the turbulence generated by the 1960s civil rights movement, and examines the escalating violence that introduced British troops to the streets of Northern Ireland. He also examines the split in the IRA that produced the Provisionals, the introduction of internment in 1971, and the tragedy of Bloody Sunday in 1972. He then discusses the struggle over political status, culminating in the Hunger Strikes of the early 1980s and describes the Provisionals' emergence as a more committed political force throughout that decade, a politicization that made possible the peace process that has developed over the last decade. English offers a dazzling synthesis of the motives, actions and consequences of the IRA. Neither romanticizing the IRA nor condemning them outright, this is a balanced, definitive treatment of one of the world's leading revolutionary movements.

  • Governing the Economy: The Politics of State Intervention in Britain and France

    For over one hundred years, the British economy has been in decline relative to other industrialized countries. This book explores the origins of Britain's economic problems and develops a striking new argument about the sources of decline. It goes on to analyze the evolution of economic policy in postwar Britain from the development of Keynesianism to the rise of monetarism under Margaret Thatcher. France, by contrast, experienced an economic miracle in the postwar period. Hall argues that the French state transformed itself and then its society through an extensive system of state intervention. In the recent period, however, the French system has encountered many difficulties, and the book locates their sources in the complex interaction between state and society in France culminating in the socialist experiment of Francois Mitterrand. Through his insightful, comparative examination of policy-making in Britain and France, Hall develops a new approach to state-society relations that emphasizes the crucial role of institutional structures.

  • How to Read a Film: Movies, Media, and Beyond

    Richard Gilman referred to How to Read a Film as simply "the best single work of its kind." And Janet Maslin in The New York Times Book Review marveled at James Monaco's ability to collect "an enormous amount of useful information and assemble it in an exhilaratingly simple and systematic way." Indeed, since its original publication in 1977, this hugely popular book has become the definitive source on film and media. Now, James Monaco offers a special anniversary edition of his classic work, featuring a new preface and several new sections, including an "Essential Library: One Hundred Books About Film and Media You Should Read" and "One Hundred Films You Should See." As in previous editions, Monaco once again looks at film from many vantage points, as both art and craft, sensibility and science, tradition and technology. After examining film's close relation to other narrative media such as the novel, painting, photography, television, and even music, the book discusses the elements necessary to understand how films convey meaning, and, more importantly, how we can best discern all that a film is attempting to communicate. In addition, Monaco stresses the ever-evolving digital context of film throughout--one of the new sections looks at the untrustworthy nature of digital images and sound--and his chapter on multimedia brings media criticism into the twenty-first century with a thorough discussion of topics like virtual reality, cyberspace, and the proximity of both to film. With hundreds of illustrative black-and-white film stills and diagrams, How to Read a Film is an indispensable addition to the library of everyone who loves the cinema and wants to understand it better.

  • An Introduction to the Languages of the World

    The only textbook of its kind, An Introduction to the Languages of the World is designed to introduce beginning linguistics students, who now typically start their study with little background in languages, to the variety of the languages of the world. It is ideal for use in courses where students have mastered the basic principles of linguistics but lack background in the broad range of language phenomena found in the world's languages, such as vowel harmony and ergative constructions. It offers students an opportunity to explore, at various levels, structures of very different, highly interesting languages without necessarily possessing a speaking or reading knowledge of these languages. Lyovin explains the classification of languages, discussing not only genetic classification but typological and sociolinguistic classification as well. He follows this with an explication of writing systems. A chapter is devoted to each of the world's continents, with in-depth analyses of representative languages of Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania, and America, and a separate chapter covers pidgins and creoles. Helpful features include an appendix of nineteen maps, student exercises, and suggestions for further reading.

  • The Foundations of Rock: From "Blue Suede Shoes" to "Suite: Judy Blue Eyes"

    A comprehensive introduction to the inner workings of rock music, The Foundations of Rock goes back to the heart of the music itself from the time of its birth through the end of classic rock. Walter Everett expertly takes readers through all aspects of the music and its lyrics, leading fans and listeners to new insights and new ways to develop their own interpretations of the aural landscapes of their lives. Written with style, Everett does not depend on musical notation nor professional jargon, but rather combines text with nearly 300 newly written audio examples (performed on the companion website) and more than 100 expertly chosen photographs, to offer a rich text-and-web experience that brings new meanings to songs that have dominated music for a half-century. Through careful illustration, frequently citing the most familiar and pertinent examples from throughout the 1955-1970 period, The Foundations of Rock covers the nature and use of all musical instruments and vocal qualities; reveals the many different ways that phrases and sections of songs can be combined; discusses the materials and patterns in melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic invention; explains the many important ways that producers and engineers add to the artistry; and finally suggests paths for combining an understanding of all of these elements with interpretations of a song's lyrics. This is all done in thorough detail, and always with an ear towards the possible meanings such techniques convey in a music that has had a profound impact upon our world. In doing so, Everett helps readers create new depths of understanding and appreciation. Hundreds of memorable hit songs are referred to in order to illustrate every individual point, while twenty-five diverse classics of the period have been chosen for very close hearing from multiple perspectives. The reader will come away with a much deeper appreciation of the music of the Beatles and the Stones, the Supremes and the Temptations, the Dead and Janis, Elvis and Buddy Holly, the Beach Boys and the Rascals.

  • The Oxford Handbook of Film and Media Studies

    The Oxford Handbook of Film and Media Studies is a major new reference work that provides the best single-volume source of original scholarship on the intersection of film and media studies. Comprised of twenty chapters written by experts in their fields, this work presents an authoritative, in-depth, and up-to-date assessment of film and media in the early twenty-first century in the U.S. and abroad. Some essays survey particular issues, such as the changing concept of 'realism' in film. Others look at current media practices, with special attention to new media. There are contributions by industry professionals, presenting an inside look at film and media today. The Handbook deals with issues as wide ranging and pertinent as copyright, globalization, television programming, video game genres, the ideologies of media, and movie going in India. As with other Oxford Handbooks, the contributors cover the field in a comprehensive yet accessible way that is suitable for those wishing to gain a good working knowledge of an area of study and where it's headed.

  • The Neuron: Cell and Molecular Biology

    The third edition of The Neuron provides a comprehensive first course in the cell and molecular biology of nerve cells. The first part of the book covers the properties of the many newly discovered ion channels that have emerged through mapping of the genome. These channels shape the way a single neuron generates varied patterns of electrical activity. Next are covered the molecular mechanisms that convert electrical activity into the secretion of neurotransmitter hormones at synaptic junctions between neurons. The second part of the book covers the biochemical pathways that are linked to the action of neurotransmitters and that can alter the cellular properties of neurons or sensory cells which transduce information from the outside world into the electrical code used by neurons. The final section reviews our rapidly expanding knowledge of the molecular factors that induce an undifferentiated cell to become a neuron, and then guide it to form appropriate synaptic connections with its partners. This section also focuses on the role of ongoing experience and activity in shaping these connections, and finishes with an account of mechanisms thought to underlie the phenomena of learning and memory.

  • A Biologic Approach to Environmental Assessment and Epidemiology

    Environmental chemical hazards are a highly contentious topic in modern life. Nearly every nation on earth has faced its own environmental crises, and also shares perspectives on the possibility of global catastrophes. Of the many global concerns we face, the environmental issue is unique in many ways. The greatest of these is the fundamental scientific nature of the issue, and the extent to which our opinions are formed based on high-level scientific inquiry and assessment. The two key fields of study on this issue, environmental epidemiology and exposure assessment, are still given separate names because of their separate historical roots and scientific traditions, but are seen increasingly as inseparable aspects of the same basic investigation. In this book, Thomas J. Smith and David Kriebel assert that important advances in the quantification of environmental risks can only come through a true synthesis of the two fields. They have built a common biologic model of exposure, physiologic response, and disease, a synthesis of the various existing models which serves to both simplify and improve the application of environmental epidemiology and exposure assessment to current and future environmental chemical risks. When exposure assessor and epidemiologist agree from the start on the model for their study, the conceptual framework for the study they design and the analyses they carry out are much more likely to yield useful exposure-risk information. An explicit biologic model of the apparent processes linking exposure to disease should form the basis for any study seeking to quantify risk from environmental chemicals.

  • If Your Adolescent Has an Eating Disorder: An Essential Resource for Parents

    This is an authoritative guide to understanding and helping a teenager with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa. It is designed for parents of teens who have recently been diagnosed with an eating disorder, or who are at risk of developing one, and for other adults, such as teachers and guidance counselors, who are regularly in contact with at-risk adolescents. The book combines the latest scientific expertise available--including the newest treatments and most up-to-date research findings on eating disorders--with the practical wisdom of parents who have raised teenagers with anorexia or bulimia. In clear and accessible language, Dr. B. Timothy Walsh and V. L. Cameron explain exactly what eating disorders are and describe their characteristics, as well as signs and symptoms. They outline the right way to go about getting a diagnosis if you suspect your child may have an eating disorder, about when and where to get treatment, and about how to navigate the healthcare system. There is also advice on how to handle everyday life--both at home and at school--once your child is diagnosed, and on how to communicate with your teen. Complete with red flags to look out for and warnings on the dangers of doing nothing, this book will help parents and other adults face and deal effectively with adolescent eating disorders before they become life-threatening.

  • Essential Logic: Basic Reasoning Skills for the Twenty-First Century

    Essential Logic offers: BL Readability. A dialogue-like yet challenging style makes this introductory logic textbook engaging and interesting. BL Essentials. Deductive and inductive reasoning, formal and informal logic are placed within a philosophical perspective. BL Rigor. A careful sequence of learning steps communicates the essential skills of reasoning and directs students to write, support, and argue by connecting criticism to key concepts. BL Relevance. Explanations and examples take students' lives into consideration and are designed for students with diverse backgrounds and a wide range of experiences. BL A Theme. Traditional concepts are integrated with a discussion of modern technological issues and the world view of modern science. A unique chapter on Logic and Hope addresses questions students often ask and suggests a global perspective. BL Controversy. Students are encouraged to defend and critique positions--including those presented by the author. A unique final chapter on Fuzzy Logic is framed as a debate between Western and Eastern philosophy. BL Exercises. Students gain confidence in recognizing arguments, structuring them into premises and conclusions, identifying and critiquing informal fallacies, while learning to create, follow, and appreciate symbolic reasoning trails. BL Coverage. Chapters cover Argument Recognition and Language Analysis, Inductive Reasoning, Structuring Informal Fallacies, Symbolic Translation, Truth Tables, Formal Proofs of Validity, Quantification, and the basics of Fuzzy Set Theory and Propositional Logic.

  • The Simple Flute: From A to Z

    For professional and amateur flautists as well as students of the flute, this book offers a practical introduction to all aspects of playing the flute. Using an accessible A-Z format, Debost offers a logical and imaginative work on flute performance that places technique at the service of music on every page. In these concise essays, readers will find simple, sensible answers to all of the problems flautists regularly encounter. Debost covers the expected topics - such as breathing, articulation, and tone - and offers personal insights into such issues as "jawboning", "finger phrasing," and "the little devils". Offering concise, common-sense solutions for flautists of all levels, this book is an ideal reference guide on flute performance.

  • Reaction Mechanisms of Inorganic and Organometallic Systems

    This third edition retains the general level and scope of earlier editions, but has been substantially updated with over 900 new references covering the literature through 2005, and 140 more pages of text than the previous edition. In addition to the general updating of materials, there is new or greatly expanded coverage of topics such as Curtin-Hammett conditions, pressure effects, metal hydrides and asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts, the inverted electron-transfer region, intervalence electron transfer, photochemistry of metal carbonyls, methyl transferase and nitric oxide synthase. The new chapter on heterogeneous systems introduces the basic background to this industrially important area. The emphasis is on inorganic examples of gas/liquid and gas/liquid/solid systems and methods of determining heterogeneity.

  • Introduction to Risk Calculation in Genetic Counseling

    The process of genetic counselling involves many key components, such as taking a family genetic history, making a diagnosis, and providing communication and support to the family. Among these core processes is the mathematical calculation of the actual risk of a possible genetic disorder. For most physicians and counsellors, the mathematics and statistics involved can be a major challenge which is not always helped by complex computer programs or lengthy papers full of elaborate formulae. In this clear, reader-friendly guide, Ian Young addresses this problem and demonstrates how risk can be estimated for inherited disorders using a basic knowledge of the laws of probability and their application to clinical problems. The text employs a wealth of clearly explained examples and "key points" in order to guide the reader to an accurate assessment of the risk of genetic disease. It primarily will appeal to genetic counsellors, geneticists, and all those involved in providing medical genetic services. In this new edition, Dr. Young has pruned redundancies and extensively updated the concepts in each of the 10 chapters, and he has included more working examples, a popular feature of the book.

  • Wondrous Strange: The Life and Art of Glenn Gould

    When Mikhail Baryshnikov defected in Toronto in 1974, he admitted that he knew only three things about Canada: It had great hockey teams, a lot of wheatfields, and Glenn Gould.
    In Wondrous Strange, Kevin Bazzana vividly recaptures the life of Glenn Gould, one of the most celebrated pianists of our time. Drawing on twenty years of intensive research, including unrestricted access to Gould's private papers and interviews with scores of friends and colleagues, many of them never interviewed before, Bazzana sheds new light on such topics as Gould's family history, his secretive sexual life, and the mysterious problems that afflicted his hands in his later years. The author places Gould's distinctive traits--his eccentric interpretations, his garish onstage demeanor, his resistance to convention--against the backdrop of his religious, upper middle-class Canadian childhood, illuminating the influence of Gould's mother as well as the lasting impact of the only piano teacher Gould ever had. Bazzana offers a fresh appreciation of Gould's concert career--his high-profile but illness-plagued international tours, his adventurous work for Canadian music festivals, his musical and legal problems with Steinway & Sons. In 1964, Gould made the extraordinary decision to perform only for records, radio, television, and film, a turning point that the author examines with unprecedented thoroughness (discussing, for example, his far-seeing interest in new recording technology). Here, too, are Gould's interests away from the piano, from his ambitious but failed effort to be a composer to his innovative brand of "contrapuntal radio."
    Richly illustrated with rare photographs, Wondrous Strange is a superbly written account of one of the most memorable and accomplished musicians of our times.

  • A River Running West: The Life of John Wesley Powell

    If the word "hero" still belonged in the historian's lexicon, it would certainly be applied to John Wesley Powell. Intrepid explorer, careful scientist, talented writer, and dedicated conservationist, Powell led the expedition that put the Colorado River on American maps and revealed the Grand Canyon to the world. Now comes the first biography of this towering figure in almost fifty years--a book that captures his life in all its heroism, idealism, and ambivalent, ambiguous humanity. In A River Running West, Donald Worster, one of our leading Western historians, tells the story of Powell's great adventures and describes his historical significance with compelling clarity and skill. Worster paints a vivid portrait of how this man emerged from the early nineteenth-century world of immigrants, fervent religion, and rough-and-tumble rural culture, and barely survived the Civil War battle at Shiloh. The heart of Worster's biography is Powell's epic journey down the Colorado in 1869, a tale of harrowing experiences, lethal accidents, and breathtaking discoveries. After years in the region collecting rocks and fossils and learning to speak the local Native American languages, Powell returned to Washington as an eloquent advocate for the West, one of America's first and most influential conservationists. But in the end, he fell victim to a clique of Western politicians who pushed for unfettered economic development, relegating the aging explorer to a quiet life of anthropological contemplation. John Wesley Powell embodied the energy, optimism, and westward impulse of the young United States. A River Running West is a gorgeously written, magisterial account of this great American explorer and environmental pioneer, a true story of undaunted courage in the American West.

  • The Nature of Design: Ecology, Culture, and Human Intention

    The environmental movement has often been accused of being overly negative-trying to stop "pogress." The Nature of Design, on the other hand, is about starting things, specifically an ecological design revolution that changes how we provide food, shelter, energy, materials, and livelihood, and how we deal with waste. Ecological design is an emerging field that aims to recalibrate what humans do in the world according to how the worl